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CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

MEDICAL COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/cornell1960unse 






CORNELL UNIVERSITY 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



AUGUST 12, 1951 



Medical College 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOR 1951-52 SESSIONS 



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CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

Ithaca, New York 



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Nledical College 

1300 York Avenue, New York 21, N. Y. 

1951-52 




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Contents 



Calendar 


4 


New York Hospital-Clornell Medical Center . 


5 


Form for Bequests . 


. 5 


The College Council and Advisory Committee . 


5 


Sloan-Ketterins: Division of Cornell University Medica 


1 


College 


6 


Officers of Administration 


8 


Executive Faculty 


8 


Standing: Committees 


9 


Faculty 


10 


General Statement 


2S 


History 


2S 


The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical College As 


- 


sociation 


25 


Facilities for Instruction 


26 


Other Hospitals for Clinical Instruction 


27 


The Russell Sage Institute of Pathology 


28 


The Loomis Laboratory 


29 


The Library 


29 


Requirements for Admission and Graduation . 


30 


Applications for Admission 


31 


Admission to Advanced Standing .... 


32 


Advancement and Examination .... 


32 


Requirements for Graduation 


35 


Examinations for Medical Licensure 


35 


General Information 


36 


Fees and Expenses 


36 


Residence and Living Expenses .... 


37 


Student Health Service 


37 


Prizes 


38 


Scholarships 


40 


Bursary for Women Students 


43 


Loan Funds 


43 


Alpha Omega Alpha 


43 


Sigma Xi 


44 


Cornell L'niversity Medical College Alumni Associa 


- 


tion, Inc. 


44 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 



Med 



icine 



Educational Policies and Plan of Instruction 
Description of Courses . 

Anatomy .... 

Bacteriology and Immunology 

Biochemistry 

Medicine .... 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Pathology .... 

Pediatrics .... 

Pharmacology . 

Physiology and Biophysics 

Psychiatry .... 

Public Health and Preventive 

Radiology .... 

Surgery .... 

Military Medicine 
The Graduate School . 

Tuition and Other Fees . 

Tuition Scholarships 
Special Students . 
Table of Required Hours 

First Year Schedule . 

Second Year Schedule 

Third Year Schedule 

Fourth Year Schedule 
Internship Appointments, Class of 1951 
Register of Students, 1951-52 

Students Matriculated in the Graduate School 
Register of the Medical College StafT 



46 
48 
48 
50 
51 
53 
61 
64 
66 
68 
70 
72 
75 
78 
80 
86 
88 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 
98 
105 
106 



1951 


1952 




July 








January 










July 




S M 


T W T F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T VV T 


F S 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 


7 






1 2 3 


4 


5 






1 2 3 


4 5 


8 9 


10 11 12 13 


14 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 12 


15 16 


17 18 19 20 


21 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 19 


22 23 


24 25 26 27 


28 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 26 


29 30 


31 

August 
1 2 3 


4 


27 


28 


29 30 31 
February 


1 


2 


27 


28 


29 30 31 
August 


1 2 


5 6 


7 8 9 10 


11 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 9 


12 13 


14 15 16 17 


18 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 16 


19 20 


21 22 23 24 


25 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 


26 27 


28 29 30 31 




24 


25 


26 27 28 


29 




24 
31 


25 


26 27 28 


29 30 




September 








March 
















1 










1 






September 




2 3 


4 5 6 7 


8 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 




1 


2 3 4 


5 6 


9 10 


11 12 13 14 


15 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


15 


15 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 13 


16 17 


18 19 20 21 


22 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 20 


23 24 


25 26 27 28 


29 


23 


24 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 27 


30 


October 




30 


31 


April 






28 


29 


30 
October 




1 


2 3 4 5 


6 






1 2 3 


4 


5 






1 2 


3 4 


7 8 


9 10 11 12 


13 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 11 


14 15 


16 17 18 19 


20 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 18 


21 22 


23 24 25 26 


27 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 25 


28 29 


30 31 
November 




27 


28 


29 30 
May 






26 


27 


28 29 30 

November 


31 




1 2 


3 






1 


2 


3 








1 


4 5 


6 7 8 9 


10 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 8 


11 12 


13 14 15 16 


17 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 15 


18 19 


20 21 22 23 


24 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 22 


25 26 


27 28 29 30 
December 




25 


26 


27 28 29 
June 


30 


31 


23 
30 


24 


25 26 27 
December 


28 29 






1 


1 


2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 




1 


2 3 4 


5 6 


2 3 


4 5 6 7 


8 


8 


9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 13 


9 10 


11 12 13 14 


15 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 20 


16 17 


18 19 20 21 


22 


22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 27 


23 24 


25 26 27 28 


29 


29 


30 








28 


29 


30 31 




30 31 

























Calendar 



1951 




July 


9 


Sept. 


1 


Sept. 


10 


Sept. 


. 10-12 


Sept. 


12 


Sept. 


13 


Oct. 


12 


Nov. 


10 


Nov. 


22 


Nov. 


30, 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


3 


Dec. 


22 


1952 




Jan. 


7 


Jan. 


24 


Feb. 


12 


Feb. 


22 


March 4-5 


March 5 


March 6-12 


March 13 


April 2 


May 29 


May 


30 


June 


2-5 


June 


11 



Registration and beginning of instruction (first division 

for 4th year students. 
First division ends for 4th year students. 
Examinations for conditioned students. 
Registration for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd year classes.* 
Opening Exercises, 3:30 P.M. 
Instruction begins for all classes, 9 A.M. 
Second division begins for 4th year students. 
Columbus Day — holiday. 
Third division begins for 4th year students. 
Thanksgiving Day — holiday. 

Examinations for 2nd year students. 
Fall term ends, 1 P.M. 
Winter term begins, 9 A.M. 
Christmas recess begins, 1 P.M. 



Christmas recess ends, 9 A.M. 

Fourth division begins for 4th year students. 

Lincoln's Birthday — holiday. 

Washington's Birthday — holiday. 

Examinations for 1st year students. 

Winter term ends, 5 P.M. 

Spring recess. 

Spring term begins, 9 A.M. 

Fifth division begins for 4th year students. 

Instruction ends for all classes. 

Memorial Day — holiday. 

Final examinations. 

Commencement, 3:30 P.M. 



* All students except fourth year students must register in person at the Administration Office 
on or before September 14. No student will be admitted after registration day without special per- 
mission. Upon registration, all fees must be paid at the Business Office. For fourth year students the 
first installment of tuition is payable on or before September 14. 



The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Nledical Center 

The Center was formed by an agreement between the Society of the 
New York Hospital and Cornell University in order to associate organi- 
cally the hospital and the medical college and to effect a complete co- 
ordination of the medical, educational, and scientific activities of the two 
institutions. 

The Center is operated under the supervision of a Joint Administrative 
Board, composed of three Governors of the Society of the New York 
Hospital, three representatives of the Board of Trustees of Cornell Uni- 
versity, and one other member elected by the appointed members. 

The Joint Administrative Board is composed of the following members : 

Stanhope Bayne- Jones, President 
Deane Waldo Malott Hamilton Hadley 

Neal D. Becker Henry S. Sturgis 

Arthur H. Dean John Hay Whitney 

John W. Davis 

FORM FOR BEQUESTS 

The Society of the New York Hospital is associated with the Cornell 
University Medical College, which is one of the colleges of Cornell Uni- 
versity, under the title of "The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center." 

Gifts or bequests should be made either to the Hospital or to the Uni- 
versity, but not to the above-named Association. 

If for the Hospital, the language may be: "I give and bequeath to the 
Society of the New York Hospital, the sum of $ " 

If for the College, the language may be: "I give and bequeath to Cor- 
nell University the sum of $ for use in connection 

with its Medical College in New York City." If it is desired that a gift 
shall be used in whole or in part for any specific purpose in connection 
with the College, such use may be specified. 

THE COLLEGE COUNCIL 

For the purpose of discharging its duties to the Memorial Hospital 
under the Douglas Deeds of Trust, the Board of Trustees is constituted as 
the Council of the Cornell University Medical College in New York City. 

THE COLLEGE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

There is also established a Medical College Advisory Committee, which 
shall consist of eleven members: The President of the University, who 



6 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

shall be Chalnnan; the President of the Joint Administrative Board; four 
Trustees to be elected by the Board of Trustees, one of whom shall be 
elected each year for the term of four years; the Dean of the Medical 
College; two members of the Faculty of the Medical College, to be elect- 
ed by such Faculty, one each year for the term of two years ; two Alumni 
of the Medical College, one to be appointed by the Medical College Al- 
umni Association and the other by the Board of Trustees, each for a term 
of one year. 

The Committee at present consists of the following members: 

Deane Waldo Malott, President of the University, Chairman, ex 
officio 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Dean of the Medical College, ex officio 

S. Bayne-Jones, President of the Joint Administrative Board, ex officio 



of the Board 



H. C. Flanigan ^ 

Jacob G. Schurman, Jr. I "^^ ""^ ^^cxl^ 

William B. Cornell J "^ Trustees 

R. Gordon Douglas 1 . , ^ 

John G. Kidd [ °f *e Faculty 

William H. Cassebaum 1 r i *i 
Paul Reznikoff ] °^ *^ ^'"""' 

Edw^ard K. Taylor, Secretary 

SLOAN-KETTERING DIVISION 
OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

By agreement dated June 16, 1950, between Cornell University, Sloan- 
Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, Memorial Center for Cancer 
and Allied Diseases, and the Society of the New York Hospital, a grad- 
uate division of Cornell University Medical College was established to be 
known as the Sloan-Kettering Division of Cornell University Medical 
College, for the basic purpose of affording training and education pri- 
marily through direct participation in investigative work on cancer and 
allied diseases and related instruction, of candidates for advanced degrees 
in recognized divisions of the physical and biological sciences but not in 
any of the clinical fields such as surgery, medicine, and pediatrics. 

While each part to the above agreement continues under control and 
management of its respective Board of Trustees or Managers, there is 
established a Co-ordinating Board of eight members, of which two shall 
be chosen by each of the parties to this agreement. This Board will act 
as a clearing house of information and as a coordinator of those functions 
in which all of the parties to this agreement are interested and will make 
recommendations to the respective Boards of the parties to the agreement. 



SLOAN-KETTERING DIVISION 

Members of the Coordinating Board of the Sloan-Kettering 
Division of Cornell University Medical College 

Representatives of Memorial Center 
Reginald G. Coombe 
Mrs. Albert D. Lasker 

Representatives of Sloan-Kettering Institute 
Frank A. Howard 
Lewis L. Strauss 

Representatives of Cornell University 
Arthur H. Dean, Chairman of the Board 
Deane W. Malott 

Representatives of The Society of the Nevu York Hospital 
John Hay Whitney 
Henry S. Sturgis 



Officers of Administration 



Deane Waldo Malott, President of the University 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Dean of the Medical College 

Lawrence W. Hanlon, Assistant Dean 

Dayton J. Edwards, Secretary of the Faculty 

Edward K. Taylor, Assistant Treasurer and Business Manager 

Beatrice Berle, Counselor to Foreign Students 

Josephine G. Nichols, Librarian 



EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Deane Waldo Malott 
David P. Barr Joseph C. Hinsey 

Stanhope Bayne-Jones John G. Kidd 

McKeen Cattell Samuel Z. Levine 

OSKAR DiETHELM JaMES M. NeILL 

R. Gordon Douglas Robert F. Pitts 

Vincent du Vigneaud Wilson G. Smillie 

Frank Glenn 



Standing Committees 



COMMITTEE ON CURRICULUM 

Vincent du Vigneaud, Chairman 
David P. Barr R. Gordon Douglas 

Charles G. Child, III John G. Kidd 

Oskar Diethelm Samuel Z. Levine 

John Y. Sugg 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Lawrence W. Hanlon, Chairman 

Thomas P. Almy Donald B. Melville 

William H. Dunn Alphonse E. Timpanelli 

Dayton J. Edwards Wilson G. vSmillie 

Preston A. Wade 



LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

Thomas P. Almy, Chairman 
Henry L. Barnett James D. Hardy 

Harry W. Burnett John MacLeod 

McKeen Cattell Julian R. Rachele 

Frank Glenn Bernard R. Samuels 

Josephine G. Nichols 

COMMITTEE ON PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Chairman 
Heads of Departments, or their representatives, responsible for 
the more important courses of each year. 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS 

James M. Neill, Chairman 
John G. Kidd John M. McLean 

Paul ReznikofT 

COMMITTEE ON PRIZES IN RESEARCH 

Robert F. Pitts, Chairman 
Thomas P. Almy John MacLeod 

S. W. Moore 



The Dean is ex officio a member of all committees. 

9 



Faculty 



DEANE WALDO MALOTT, President of the University. (A.B. 1921, University of 
Kansas; M.B.A. 1923, Harvard Business School; LL.D. 1941, Washburn University.) 

JOSEPH C. HINSEY, Dean of the Medical College. (B.S. 1922, M.S. 1923, North- 
western; Ph.D. 1927, Washington University.) 



EMERITUS PROFESSORS 



RUSSELL L. CECIL, M.D. [1910; 1950] 
EUGENE F. Dubois, M.D. [1910; 1950] 
DAYTON J. EDWARDS, Ph.D. [1918; 1950] 
WILLIAM J. ELSER, M.D. [1901; 1938] 
N. CHANDLER FOOT, M.D. [1932; 1948] 
MALCOLM GOODRIDGE, M.D. [1910; 1946] 
CONNIE M. GUION, M.D. [1924; 1951] 
JAMES A. HARRAR, M.D. [1932; 1948] 



ELISE STRANG L'ESPERANCE, M.D. [1910; 1950] 

EUGENE L. OPIE, M.D. [1932; 1941] 
GEORGE PAPANICOLAOU, M.D. [1914; 1951] 
BERNARD R. SAMUELS, M.D. [1914; 1942] 

OSCAR M. SCHLOSS, M.D. [1918; 1950] 
HANS J. SCHWARTZ, M.D. [1911; 1942] 

ALEXANDER R. STEVENS, M.D. [1924; 1946] 

JOSHUA E. SWEET, M.D. [1926; 1941] 



Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Professor of Physiology 

Professor of Physiology 

Professor of Applied Pathology 

Professor of Surgical Pathology 

Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and 

Gynecology 

Professor of Clinical Public 

Health and Preventive Medicine 

Professor of Pathology 

Professor of Clinical Anatomy 

Professor of Clinical Surgery 

{Ophthalmology) 

Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

Professor of Clinical Medicine 

{Dermatology) 

Professor of Clinical Surgery 

{Urology) 

Professor of Experimental Surgery 



PROFESSORS 

DAVID P. BARR, Professor of Medicine. Physician-in-Chief, New York Hospital; 

Consulting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1911, M.D. 1914, Cornell; LL.D. 

1929, Central College. [1916; 1941]) 
DONALD G. W. BROOKING, Professor of Military Science and Tactics. Captain, 

M.C., U.S. Army. (B.S. 1946, B.M. 1948, M.D. 1949, Universitv of Minnesota. 

[1951]) 
ALEXANDER BRUNSCHWIG, Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 

Memorial Hospital. (B.A. 1923, M.S. 1924, University of Chicago; M.D. 1926, 

Rush. [1947]) 
McKEEN CATTELL, Professor of Pharmacology. (B.S. 1914, Columbia; A.M. 1917, 

Ph.D. 1920, M.D. 1924, Harvard. [1924; 1943]) 
OSKAR DIETHELM, Professor of Psychiatry. Psychiatrist-in-Chief, New York Hos- 
pital. (Statsexamen 1922, U. of Zurich; M.D. 1923, U. of Berne. [1936]) 



* The figures in brackets following the name of each faculty member indicate the date of original 
appointment and the year of induction into present rank. 

10 



FACULTY 11 

R. GORDON DOUGLAS, Projessor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Obstetrician-and 
Gynecologist-in-Chief, New York Hospital. (M.D.C.M. 1924, McGill. [1932; 1949]) 

GUILFORD S. DUDLEY, Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending Surgeon, 
New York Hospital; Consultant in Surgery, Second Surgical Division, Bellevue 
Hospital. (A.B. 1910, M.D. 1913, Cornell. [1917; 1949]) 

VINCENT DU VIGNEAUD, Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1923, M.S. 1924, Illinois; 
Ph.D. 1927, Rochester. [1938]) 

FRANK GLENN, Lewis Atterbury Stimson Professor of Surgery. Surgeon-in-Chief, New 
York Hospital. (M.D. 1927, Washington University. [1932; 1947]) 

BYRON H. GOFF, Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Consultant in Ob- 
stetrics and Gynecology. New York Hospital. (B.S. 1908, M.D. 1911, Pennsylvania. 
[1935; 1950]) 

HARRY GOLD, Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (A.B. 1919, M.D. 1922, Cornell. 
[1922; 1947]) 

PHYLLIS GREENACRE, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Attending Psychiatrist, 
New York Hospital. (B.S. 1913, U. of Chicago; M.D. 1916, Rush. [1932; 1933]) 

LOUIS HAUSMAN, Professor of Clinical Medicine {Neurology). Associate Attending 
Physician (Neurology), New York Hospital; Visiting Neurologist in Charge, Belle- 
vue Hospital. (A.B. 1912, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1916, Cornell. 
[1923; 1945]) 

JOSEPH C. HINSEY, Dean; Professor of Anatomy. (B.S. 1922, M.S. 1923, North- 
western; Ph.D. 1927, Washington University; Sc.D. 1951, Northwestern. [1936]) 

FOSTER KENNEDY, Professor of Clinical Medicine {Neurology). Consulting Neurolo- 
gist, New York and Memorial Hospitals; Consulting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. 
(M.B., B.Ch. 1906, Royal University, Ireland; M.D. 1910, Dublin. [1911; 1924]) 

JOHN G. KIDD, Professor of Pathology. Pathologist-in-Chief, New York Hospital. 
A.B. 1928, Duke; M.D. 1932, Johns Hopkins. [1944]) 

SAMUEL Z. LEVINE, Professor of Pediatrics. Pediatrician-in-Chief, New York Hos- 
pital. (A.B. 1916, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1920, Cornell. [1924; 
1936]) 

GEORGE M. LEWIS, Professor of Clinical Medicine {Dermatology). Associate Attend- 
ing Physician (Dermatology), New York Hospital. (M.D, 1925, University of 
Alberta; L.M.C.C. 1925, Medical College of Canada. [1932; 1949]) 

ASA L. LINCOLN, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1910, M.A. 1911, 
Elon College; M.D. 1916, Johns Hopkins. [1921; 1941]) 

JOHN M. McLEAN, Professor of Clinical Surgery {Ophthalmology). Attending Surgeon 
in Charge of Ophthalmology, New York Hospital. (M.E. 1930, Stevens Institute; 
M.D. 1934, Cornell. [1941; 1943]) 

CHARLES V. MORRILL, Professor of Anatomy. (A.B. 1903, College of the City of 
New York; A.M. 1906, Ph.D. 1910, Columbia. [1915; 1951]) 

JAMES M. NEILL, Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. (B.S. 1917, Allegheny; 
Ph.D. 1921, Massachusetts Agricultural College; D.Sc. 1940, Allegheny. [1931]) 

ARTHUR PALMER, Professor of Clinical Surgery {Otolaryngology) . Attending Surgeon 
(Otolaryngology), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1911, Brown; M.D. 1915, Cornell. 
[1923; 1948]) 

JOHN M. PEARCE, Professor of Pathology; Professor of Pathology in Surgery. Surgical 
Pathologist, New York Hospital. (Ph.B. 1930, Yale; M.D. 1934, Harvard. [1948]) 

ROBERT F. PITTS, Professor of Physiology. (B.S. 1929, Butler University; Ph.D. 
1932, Johns Hopkins; M.D. 1938, New York University. [1942; 1950]) 

BRONSON S. RAY, Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon in Charge of 
Neurosurgery, New York Hospital; Consulting Neuro-surgeon, New York Hos- 
pital, Westchester Division; Clinical Assistant Visiting Neuro-Psychiatrist, Belle- 
vue Hospital. (B.S. 1924, Franklin; M.D. 1928, Northwestern. [1932; 1948]) 



12 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

THOMAS A. C. RENNIE, Professor oj Psychiatry (Social Psychiatry). Attending Psy- 
chiatrist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1924, University of Pittsburgh; M.D. 1928, 
Harvard. [1942; 1950]) 

PAUL REZNIKOFF, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, New York 
Hospital; Consulting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1916, New York University; 
M.D. 1920, Cornell. [1924; 1946]) 

CORNELIUS P. RHOADS, Professor of Pathology. Director, Memorial Hospital. 
(A.B. 1920, Bowdoin; M.D. 1924, Harvard. [1941]) 

LEO W. SIMMONS, Visiting Professor of Anthropology in Medicine. (B.A. 1923, Bethany; 
B.D. 1925, M.A. 1927, Ph.D. 1931, Yale. [1950]) 

WILSON G. SMILLIE, Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. Consultant 
in Preventive Medicine and Public Health, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1908, Colo- 
rado College; M.D. 1912, D.P.H. 1916, Harvard. [1937]) 

LEWIS D. STEVENSON, Professor of Clinical Medicine {Neurology) ; Associate Professor 
of Pathology. Attending Pathologist, Associate Attending Physician (Neurology), 
New York Hospital; Consulting Neurologist, New York Hospital, Westchester 
Division; Associate Visiting Neuro- Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1916, 
M.D. 1916, Queen's University. [1922; 1945]) 

FRED W. STEWART, Professor of Pathology; Associate Professor of Surgical Pathology. 
Attending Pathologist, New York Hospital; Pathologist, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 
1916, Ph.D. 1919, Cornell; M.D. 1924, Harvard. [1928; 1949]) 

HAROLD L. TEMPLE, Professor of Clinical Radiology. Attending Radiologist, New 
York Hospital. (B.S. 1932, M.D. 1935, University of Nebraska. [1941; 1946]) 

SIDNEY WEINTRAUB, Professor of Clinical Radiology. Acting Head, Radiology De- 
partment; Attending Radiologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1918, Columbia. 
[1932; 1950]) 

HAROLD G. WOLFF, Professor of Medicine {Neurology); Associate Professor of Psy- 
chiatry. Attending Physician, Associate Attending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital; 
Consulting Neurologist, New York Hospital, Westchester Division; Clinical Assist- 
ant Visiting Neuro-Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1918, College of the City 
of New York; M.D. 1923, M.A. 1928, Harvard. [1931; 1948]) 

IRVING S. WRIGHT, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, New York 
Hospital. (A.B. 1923, M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1946; 1949]) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

FRANK E. ADAIR, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, Me- 
morial Hospital. (A.B. 1910, ScD. 1934, Marietta College; M.D. 1915, Johns 
Hopkins. [1934; 1938]) 

THOMAS P. ALMY, James Ewing Associate Professor of Neoplastic Diseases {Medicine). 
Associate Attending Physician, New York Hospital. Assistant Attending Physician, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1935, M.D. 1939, Cornell. [1940; 1948]) 

ARTHUR F. ANDERSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1916, Tufts. [1930; 1948]) 

HORACE S. BALDWIN, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1917, Wesleyan University; M.D. 1921, 
Cornell. [1923; 1947]) 

WILLIAM A. BARNES, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1933, College of the City of New York; M.D. 
1937, Cornell. [1938; 1946]) 

HENRY L. BARNETT, Associate Professor of Pediatrics. Associate Attending Pedi- 
atrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1938, M.D. 1938, Washington University. 
[1946; 1950]) 

CHARLES BERRY, Associate Professor of Anatomy. (A.B. 1938, De Pauw; M.S. 1930, 
Ph.D. 1941, Northwestern. [1947; 1951]) 



FACULTY 13 

CARL A. BINGER, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attending Psy- 
chiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. i910, M.D. 1914, Harvard. [1932; 1948]) 

OSCAR BODANSKY, Associate Projessor oj Clinical Pharmacology. Attending Clinical 
Biochemist, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1921, Ph.D. 1925, Columbia; M.D. 1938, 
University of Chicago. [1946; 1948]) 

ROY W. BONSNES, Associate Projessor of Biochemistry; Associate Professor of Biochemistry 
in Obstetrics and Gynecology. (B.S. 1930, University of Connecticut; Ph.D. 1939, 
Yale. [1941; 1950]) 

GEORGE B. BROWN, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1934, Illinois Wesleyan; 
M.S. 1936, Ph.D. 1938, University of Illinois. [1939; 1950]) 

CHARLES G. CHILD, III, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1930, Yale; M.D. 1934, Cornell. [1935; 1947]) 

ANTHONY C. CIPOLLARO, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine {Dermatology). 
Assistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1924, Dartmouth; M.D. 
1927, Columbia. [1948; 1951]) 

BRADLEY L. COLEY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1915, Yale; M.D. 1919, Columbia. [1941; 1950]) 

HERBERT CONWAY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon in 
Charge of Plastic Surgery, New York Hospital. (M.B. 1928, B.S. 1929, M.D. 1929, 
M.S. 1932, University of Cincinnati. [1932; 1946]) 

WILLIAM A. COOPER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, Stanford University; M.D. 1932, Cornell. 
[1934; 1946]) 

NELSON W. CORNELL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1918, M.D. 1921, Cornell. [1925; 1942]) 

LLOYD F. GRAVER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1915, M.D. 1918, Cornell. [1934; 1948]) 

HAROLD W. K. DARGEON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Attending 
Pediatrician, Memorial Hospital. (M.D. 1922, Albany. [1947; 1951]) 

EMERSON DAY, Associate Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 
Director, Strang Cancer Prevention Clinic, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1934, Dart- 
mouth; M.D. 1938, Harvard. [1947; 1950]) 

*JOHN E. DEITRICK, Associate Professor of Medicine. Associate Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1929, Princeton; M.D. 1933, Johns Hopkins. 
[1934; 1946]) 

EDWARD H. DENNEN, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. At- 
tending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1919, Tufts. 
[1933; 1949]) 

J. LOUISE DESPERT, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, Barnard; M.D. 1932, New York 
University. [1939; 1951]) 

JOHN W. DRAPER, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery {Urology). Associate 
Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Visiting Surgeon in Charge 
of Urological Service, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1927, Dartmouth; M.D. 1931, 
Cornell. [1932; 1949]) 

WILLIAM H. DUNN, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, Rochester; M.D. 1927, Harvard. 
[1932; 1947]) 

HENRY S. DUNNING, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine {Neurology). Associ- 
ate Attending Physician, New York Hospital; Clinical Assistant Visiting Neuro- 
Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1927, M.D. 1930, Cornell. [1932; 1948]) 

JOHN H. ECKEL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending Surgeon, 
New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1929, 
New York University; M.D. 1933, Cornell. [1934; 1946]) 

* On leave of absence. 



14 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

CARY EGGLESTON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Consulting Physician, 
New York Hospital; Consulting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (M.D. 1907, Cornell. 
[1911; 1939]) 

FRANK W. FOOTE, Associate Professor of Pathology. Associate Attending Patholo- 
gist, New York Hospital. Associate Attending Pathologist, Memorial Hospital. 
(A.B. 1931, M.D. 1941, University of Virginia. [1949]) 

CLAUDE E. FORKNER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1922, M.A. 1923, University of California; M.D. 
1926, Harvard [1938; 1946]) 

RICHARD H. FREYBERG, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.D. 1930, M.S. 1934, University 
of Michigan. [1945]) 

KRISTIAN G. HANSSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Physiotherapy). Di- 
rector of Physiotherapy, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1920, M.D. 1923, Cornell. 
[1925; 1948]) 

JAMES D. HARDY, Associate Professor of Physiology. (A.B. 1924, A.M. 1925. Missis- 
sippi; Ph.D. 1930, Johns Hopkins. [1937; 1947]) 

EDWIN T. HAUSER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1916, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1922, 
Cornell. [1925; 1949]) 

EDWARD J. HEHRE, Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. (A.B. 1934, 
M.D. 1937, Cornell. [1938; 1949]) 

GEORGE W. HENRY, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Attending Psychi- 
atrist. New York Hospital. (A.B. 1912, Wesleyan; M.D. 1916, Johns Hopkins. 
[1928; 1932]) 

CRANSTON W, HOLMAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital; Assistant Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. 
(A.B. 1927, M.D. 1930, Stanford. [1932; 1946]) 

CARL T. JAVERT, Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Attending Ob- 
stetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1932, Buffalo. [1937; 1949]) 

MORTON C. KAHN, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. (B.S. 
1916, Ph.D. 1924, Cornell; A.M. 1917, Columbia; Sc.D. 1938, Havana. [1919; 
1934]) 

HENRY D. LAUSON, Associate Professor of Physiology; Associate Professor of Physiology 
in Pediatrics. Assistant Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1936, Ph.D. 
1939, M.D. 1940, University of Wisconsin. [1950; 1951]) 

FREDERICK L. LIEBOLT, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). Attend- 
ing Surgeon in Charge of Orthopedics, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1925, LL.D. 
1928, University of Arkansas; M.D. 1930, Washington University; Sc.D. 1937, 
Columbia. [1939; 1946]) 

MARY E. H. LOVELESS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Allergy). Assistant 
Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1921, M.D. 1925, Stanford. [1939; 
1948]) 

WILLIAM F. MacFEE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1914, University of Tennessee; M.D. 1918, Johns Hop- 
kins. [1936]) 

JOHN MacLeod, Associate Professor of Anatomy; Assistant Professor of Physiology. 
(A.B. 1934, M.Sc. 1937, New York University; Ph.D. 1941, Cornell. [1941; 1949"]) 

GERVAIS W. McAULIFFE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology). 
Attending Surgeon (Otolaryngology), New York Hospital. (M.D. 1920, Long 
Island College Hospital. [1926; 1942]) 

HOWARD S. McCANDLISH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1917, Uni- 
versity of Virginia. [1921; 1949]) 



FACULTY 15 

WALSH McDERMOTT, Associate Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician, New- 
York Hospital. (A.B. 1930, Princeton; M.D. 1934, Columbia. [1935; 1946]) 

CHARLES M. McLANE, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. At- 
tending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1924, M.D. 
1928, Johns Hopkins. [1932; 1949]) 

ALLISTER M. McLELLAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery {Urology). Attend- 
ing Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Attending Urologist, New York Hos- 
pital, Westchester Division. (M.D. 1924, McGill. [1932; 1948]) 

VICTOR F. MARSHALL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery {Urology). Attending 
Surgeon in Charge of Urology, New York Hospital; Assistant Attending Surgeon. 
Memorial Hospital. (M.D. 1937, University of Virginia. [1938; 1946]) 

HAYES F. MARTIN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, Me- 
morial Hospital. (A.B. 1911, M.D. 1917, Iowa. [1941; 1950]) 

DONALD B. MELVILLE, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1936, M.S. 193^, 
Ph.D. 1939, University of IlHnois. [1944; 1948]) 

ADE T. MILHORAT, Associate Professor of Medicine in Psychiatry; Associate Professor 
of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. J 924, 
Columbia; M.D. 1928, Cornell. [1933; 1951]) 

JAMES A. MOORE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery {Otolaryngology) . Attending 
Surgeon in Charge of Otolaryngology, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1930, Davidson 
College; M.D. 1934, Harvard. [1941; 1948]) 

S. W. MOORE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, New York 
Hospital; Assistant Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1926, Davidson; 
M.D. 1930, Harvard. [1932; 1946]) 

CARL MUSCHENHEIM, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, M.D. 1931, Columbia. [1933; 1946]) 

JOSEPH N. NATHANSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. CM. 1919, 
McGill. [1926; 1951]) 

WILLIAM F. NICKEL, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. 
(A.B. 1930, M.D. 1934, Johns Hopkins. [1935; 1950]) 

JAMES J. NICKSON, Associate Professor of Radiology. Attending Radiation Therapist, 
Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1936, Harvard; M.D. 1940, Johns Hopkins. [1949; 1951]) 

THEODORE W. OPPEL, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.A. 1927, Wisconsin; M.D. 1929, 
Pennsylvania. [1932; 1951]) 

GEORGE T. PACK, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, Me- 
morial Hospital. (B.S. 1920, Ohio State; M.D. 1922, Yale. [1935; 1950]) 

HAROLD E. B. PARDEE, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1906, M.D. 1909, Columbia. [1917; 1926]) 

RUSSEL H. PATTERSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital; Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1914, 
Georgia; M.D. 1918, Harvard. [1921; 1946]) 

E. COOPER PERSON, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 
1931, University of North Carolina; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1936; 1946]) 

RALPH F. PHILLIPS, Associate Professor of Radiology. Associate Attending Radiation 
Therapist, Memorial Hospital. (B.S.M.B. 1928, M.S. 1930, University of London; 
D.M.R.E. 1933, Royal College of England. [1950; 1951]) 

JULIAN R. R HELE, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. (B.A. 1934, M.S. 1935, 
Ph.D. 1939, Nt ork University. [1940; 1948]) 

HENRY T. RAND.v L, Associate Professor of Surgery. Assistant Attending Surgeon, 
Presbyterian Hospital, Clinical Director and Chief of Surgical Services, Memorial 
Hospital. (A.B. 1937, Princeton; M.D. 1941, Med. Sc.D. 1940, Columbia. [1951]) 



16 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 



RULON W. RAWSON, Associate Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician, Memo- 
rial Hospital. (M.B. 1937, M.D. 1938, Northwestern. [1948]) 

HENRY B. RICHARDSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1910, 
M.D. 1914, Harvard. [1924; 1932]) 

WALTER F. RIKER, Associate Professor of Pharmacology. (B.S. 1939, Columbia; 
M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1941; 1950]) 

SIDNEY ROTHBARD, Associate Professor of Medicine. Chief, Division of Pulmonary 
Diseases, Montefiorc Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Colgate; M.D. 1935, Rochester. [1951]) 

ROBERT S. SHERMAN, Associate Professor of Radiology. Attending Roentgenologist, 
Memorial Hospital. (Ph.B. 1931, Brown; M.D. 1935, Harvard. [1947; 1951]) 

EPHRAIM SHORR, Associate Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician, New York 
Hospital. (A.B. 1919, M.D. 1922, Yale. [1926; 1942]) 

DONALD J. SIMONS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital; Clinical Assistant Visiting Neuro-Psychiatrist, 
Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1927, Brown; M.D. 1931, Harvard. [1939; 1948]) 

CARL H. SMITH, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending Pedi- 
atrician, New York Hospital. (B.A. 1915, College of the City of New York; M.A. 
1917, Columbia; M.D. 1922, Cornell. [1928; 1947]) 

FRANK R. SMITH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Attending 
Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital; Associate Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1917, Yale; M.D. 1921, Harvard. [1932; 1950]) 

HAROLD J. STEWART, Associate Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician, New 
York Hospital. (A.B. 1915, M.D. 1919, A.M. 1923, Johns Hopkins. [1932]) 

PHILIP M. STIMSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1910, Yale; M.D. 1914, Cornell. [1919; 
1942]) 

JOHN Y. SUGG, Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. (B.S. 1926, Ph.D. 
1931, Vanderbilt. [1932; 1943]) 

HENRY J. TAGNON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attending 
Physician, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1931, Liege; M.D. 1936, Brussels. [1947; 1948]) 

EDWARD TOLSTOI, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, Yale; M.D. 1923, Cornell. [1927; 1947]) 

JANET TRAVELL, Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (A.B. 1922, Wellesley; 
M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1930; 1947]) 

PRESTON A. WADE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending Sur- 
geon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1922, M.D. 1925, Cornell. [1927; 1946]) 

JAMES H, WALL, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiaty. Medical Director, New 
York Hospital, Westchester Division. (M.D. 1927, Jefferson Medical College. 
[1933; 1946]) 

ROBERT F. WATSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital. (M.D. 1934, University of Virginia. [1946; 1950]) 

BRUCE P. WEBSTER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New^ York Hospital. (M.D. CM. 1925, McGill. [1932; 1947]) 

MAY G. WILSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending Pedi- 
atrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1911, Cornell. [1918; 1942]) 

STEWART G. WOLF, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1934, M.D. 1938, Johns Hopkins. [1939: 
1950]) 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 



HAROLD B. ADAMS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1917, Columbia; M.D. 1920, Cornell. 
[1934; 1944]) 



FACULTY 17 

ANDREW J. AKELAITIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine {Neurology). Assist- 
ant Attending Ptiysician, New York Hospital; Clinical Assistant Visiting Neuro- 
Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1925, M.D. 1929, Johns Hopkins. [1947]) 

ARTHUR C. ALLEN, Assistant Projessor oj Pathology. Assistant Attending Patholo- 
gist, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1931, M.D. 1936, University of California. [1951]) 

JOSEPH F. ARTUSIO, Jr., Assistant Projessor of Surgery {Anesthesia) . Anesthetist-in- 
Charge, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1939, St. Peter's;'M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1946; 
1948]) 

IRVIN BALENSWEIG, Assistant Projessor oJ Clinical Surgery {Orthopedics). Associate 
Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital. B.S. 1915, College of the 
City of New York; M.D. 1918, Cornell. [1920; 1934]) 

LEONA BAUMGARTNER, Assistant Projessor oJ Public Health and Preventive Medicine; 
Assistant Projessor of Clinical Pediatrics. (A.B. 1923, M.A. 1925, Kansas; Ph.D. 193?, 
M.D. 1934, Yale. [1935; 1940]) 

SAMUEL R. BERENBERG, Assistant Projessor oJ Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine; Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. (A.B. 1931, Amherst; M.D. 
1935, University of Vermont. [1947; 1951]) 

BEATRICE B. BERLE, Assistant Projessor oJ Clinical Public Health and Preventive Medi- 
cine. (A.B. 1923, Vassar; M.A. 1924, Columbia; M.D. 1938, New York University. 
[1946; 1950]) 

MILTON L. BERLINER, Assistant Projessor oJ Clinical Surgery {Ophthalmology). As- 
sociate Attending Surgeon (Ophthalmology), New York Hospital. (M.D. 1918, 
Long Island College Hospital. [1928; 1934]) 

JOHN J. BIESELE, Assistant Projessor oJ Anatomy. (A.B. 1939, Ph.D. 1942, University 
of Texas. [1950]) 

GEORGE E. BINKLEY, Assistant Projessor oJ Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (M.B. 1914, Toronto. [1950]) 

KEEVE BRODMAN, Assistant Projessor oJ Clinical Medicine. (B.S. 1927, College of 
the City of New York; M.D. 1931, Cornell. [1938; 1950]) 

JACOB BUCKSTEIN, Assistant Professor oJ Clinical Medicine. Visiting Roentgenol- 
ogist, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1911, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1915, 
Cornell. [1927; 1940]) 

JOSEPH H. BURCHENAL, Assistant Projessor oJ Medicine. Assistant Attending Phy- 
sician, Memorial Hospital. (M.D. 1937, University of Pennsylvania. [1949]) 

HARRY W. BURNETT, Assistant Projessor oJ Radiology. Assistant Attending Radiolo- 
gist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1940, Miami University; M.D. 1943, Northwestern 
University. [1948; 1949]) 

KATHERINE BUTLER, Assistant Projessor oJ Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital; Assistant Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. 
(A.B. 1920, Mt. Holyoke; M.A. 1926, Columbia; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1938; 1951]) 

HENRY A. CARR, Assistant Projessor oJ Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Princeton; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1947; 
1950]) 

WILLIAM H. GARY, Assistant Projessor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. (M.D. 
1905, Syracuse. [1937; 1946]) 

AARON D. CHAVES, Assistant Projessor oJ Clinical Public Health and Preventive Medi- 
cine; Assistant Projessor oJ Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending Physician, New York 
Hospital. (B.S. 1931, William and Mary; M.D. 1935, New York Universitv. [1946; 
1951]) 

CLEMENT B. P. COBB, Assistant Projessor oJ Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1922, Williams; M.D. 1926, Harvard. 
[1934; 1944]) 

JOHN T. COLE, Assistant Projessor oJ Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Associate At- 
tending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1936, Duke; 
M.D. 1940, University of Maryland. [1941; 1951]) 



18 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

OGDEN F. CONKEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Associate 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1908, St. 
Lawrence; M.D. 1912, Columbia. [1922; 1946]) 

ARTHUR D. CONSOLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Neurosurgery). Assist- 
ant Attending Surgeon (Neurosurgery), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1937, Cornell; 
M.D. 1941, Cornell. [1944; 1951]) 

FRANK E. CORMIA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine {Dermatology). Assistant 
Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1926, M.D. 1930, University of 
Vermont. [1946; 1948]) 

ROBERT L. CRAIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Associate 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1923, College 
of the City of New York; M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1932; 1949]) 

MARGARET DANN, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. Associate Attending Pedia- 
trician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, Oberlin; M.S. 1925, Illinois; Ph.D. 1932, 
Cornell; M.D. 1937, Yale. [1938; 1945]) 

MICHAEL R. DEDDISH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1933, M.D. 1937, Ohio State University, 
[1942; 1951]) 

PAUL F. DE GARA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics {Allergy). Assistant Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1926, University of Heidelberg; M.D. 
1927, University of Padua. [1941; 1950]) 

PETER G. DENKER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine {Neurology). Associate 
Visiting Neuro-Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1923, College of the City of 
New York; M.D. 1927, Cornell. [1932; 1941]) 

JAMES A. DINGWALL, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital; Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1936, 
Dartmouth; M.D. 1940, Cornell. [1941; 1946]) 

CHARLES T. DOTTER, Assistant Professor of Radiology. Assistant Attending Radi- 
ologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1941, Duke; M.D. 1944, Cornell. [1948; 1951]) 

ROBERT O. Dubois, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1915, M.D. 1919, Columbia. [1923; 1940]) 

EDWARD A. DUNLAP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Ophthalmology). Assist- 
ant Attending Surgeon (Ophthalmology), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1932, West- 
minster; M.D. 1935, Western Reserve. [1945; 1948]) 

HOWARD A. EDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1938, University of Wisconsin; M.D. 1942, 
M.P.H., 1945, Harvard. [1950]) 

HERBERT R. EDWARDS, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 
(M.D. 1918, College of Medical Evangelists. [1942]) 

GEORGE F. EGAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Dentistry). Attending Dental 
Surgeon in Charge, New York Hospital. (D.M.D. 1931, Harvard. [1933; 1948]) 

HELENE ELIASBERG, Assistant Pwfessor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1919, University of Berlin. [1943; 1948]) 

JOHN T. ELLIS, Assistant Professor of Pathology; Assistant Professor of Pathology in 
Surgery. Assistant Attending Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1942, Univer- 
sity of Texas; M.D. 1945, Northwestern. [1948; 1950]) 
OHN A. EVANS, Assistant Professor of Radiology. Associate Attending Radiologist, 
New York Hospital. (B.S. 1931, New York University; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1937; 
1951]) 

JOSEPH H. FARROW, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1926, M.D. 1930, University of Virginia. [1950; 
1951]) 

AARON FEDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1938, University of Maryland. [1941; 1950]) 



FACULTY 19 

GEORGE A. FIEDLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). Associate At- 
tending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1923, Wisconsin; M.D. 
1925, Pennsylvania. [1950]) 

WILLIAM F. FINN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Associate 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1936, Holy 
Cross; M.D. 1940, Cornell. [1942; 1948 ) 

ELIZABETH F. FOCHT, Assistant Professor of Radiology (Physics). Associate Attend- 
ing Physicist, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1935, Barnard. [1947; 1951]) 

WILLIAM T. FOLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1933, Columbia; M.D. 1937, Cornell. [1946; 
1951]) 

FRANKLIN M. FOOTE, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine- 
(B.S. 1930, M.D. 1933, D.P.H. 1935, Yale. [1941]) 

LEWIS M. FRAAD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending Pedia- 
trician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1935, University of Vienna. [1945; 1949]) 

JOHN E. FRANKLIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. Assistant Attending Pediatrician, Memorial Hos- 
pital. (B.S. 1928, Notre Dame; M.D. 1932, Harvard. [1947; 1948]) 

EDGAR L. FRAZELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1929, M.D. 1931, University o^ Texas. [1950]) 

CONSTANCE FRIESS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, Barnard; M.D. 1932, Cornell. [1933; 
1944]) 

RALPH W. CAUSE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Associate 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, Uni- 
versity of Texas; M.D. 1930, Harvard. [1935; 1947]) 

HAROLD GENVERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital. (D.D.S. 1932, Pennsylvania; M.D. 1936, Yale. [1937; 
1950]) 

WILLIAM A. GEOHEGAN, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. (E.E. 1929, M.D. 1941, 
Cornell. [1941; 1944]) 

J. RANDOLPH GEPFERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 
1929, University of Georgia. [1941; 1951]) 

JOHN C. A. GERSTER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. (A.B. 1902, M.D. 1905, 
Columbia. [1913; 1919]) 

HELENA GILDER, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (A.B. 1935, Vassar; M.D. 1940, 
Cornell. [1947; 1950]) 

OSCAR CLASSMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Associate 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, Univer- 
sity of Utah; M.D. 1925, New York University. [1946; 1951]) 

MARTIN J. GLYNN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Fordham; M.D. 1935, Long Island 
College. [1939; 1943]) 

HENRY P. GOLDBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1932, M.D. 1936, Johns Hopkins. [1946; 
1950]) 

DAN M. GORDON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). Assistant 

Attending Surgeon (Ophthalmology), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1929, M.D. 1932, 

Michigan. [1945; 1948]) 
WILLIAM J. GRACE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 

Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1938, St. Peter's College; M.D. 1942, Cornell. 

[1944; 1950]) 



20 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 



ARTHUR V. GREELEY, Assistant Professor oj Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Asso 
ciate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 192S' 
Yale; M.D. 1929, Johns Hopkins. [1932; 1949]) 

SIDNEY GREENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Visiting 
Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1925, M.D. 1928, Cornell. [1934; 1950]) 

FRANCIS J. HAMILTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attend- 
ing Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, St. Joseph's College; M.D. 1933, 
Jefferson. [1940; 1949]) 

LAWRENCE W. HANLON, Assistant Dean, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. (A.B. 1935, 

M.D. 1938, Cornell. [1946; 1948]) 
JAMES Q. HARALAMBIE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Oberlin; M.D. 1935, Yale. [1939; 
1949]) 

HELEN HARRINGTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B., M.A. 1916, University of Denver; M.D. 
Johns Hopkins. [1933; 1944]) 

RiCHARD L. HARRIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. (M.D. 1920, Uni- 
versity of Georgia. [1951]) 

W. HALL HAWKINS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. (A.B. 
1906, Central University of Kentucky; M.D. 1911, Johns Hopkins. [1932; 1941]) 

MILTON HELPERN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Visiting Phy- 
sician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1922, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1926, 
Cornell. [1931; 1940]) 

NORMAN L. HIGINBOTHAM, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate At- 
tending Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. M.D. CM. 1926, McGill. [1940; 1950]) 

LAWRENCE E. HINKLE, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (A.B. 1938, 
University of North Carolina; M.D. 1942, Harvard. [1947; 1951]) 

GUSTAVUS A. HUMPHREYS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Urology). As- 
sistant Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Sur- 
geon (Urology), Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1927, Princeton; M.D. 1932, Columbia. 
[1937; 1946]) 

FREDERICK C. HUNT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1924, Western Ontario. [1932; 1940]) 

GERALD R. JAMEISON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Attending Psy- 
chiatrist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1918, Albany Medical College. [1933; 1936]) 

GEORGE JASPIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. Associate Attending Radi- 
ologist in Charge of School of Radiology, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1932, Colum- 
bia; M.D. 1936, Michigan. [1945; 1948]) 

D. REES JENSEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending Surgeon, 
New York Hospital. (M.D. 1925, Columbia. [1928; 1949]) 

DONALD G. JOHNSON, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Associate 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.A. 1936, Maine; 
M.D. 1940, Yale. [1942; 1948]) 

EDMUND N. JOYNER, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1927, Virginia Military Institute; 
M.D. 1932, Cornell. [1934; 1948]) 

BERNARD KALFAYAN, Assistant Professor of Pathology. Associate Attending Patholo- 
gist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1939, American University of Beirut. [1948; 1949]) 

DAVID A. KARNOFSKY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1934, University of California; A.M. 1936, 
M.D. 1940, Stanford. [1949]) 

GEORGE L. KAUER, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Visiting 
Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1933, New York University: M.D. 1937. Cor- 
nell. .f^l938: 19491) 



FACULTY 21 

SAMUEL F. KELLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology). Assistant' 
Attending Surgeon (Otolaryngology), New York Hospital. (M.D. 1921, University 
of Texas. [1926; 19431) 

AARON KELLNER, Assistant Professor of Pathology. Associate Attending Pathologist, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1934, Yeshiva University; M.S. 1935, Columbia; M.D. 
1939, University of Chicago. [1946; 1950]) 

CHARLES J. KENSLER, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. (A.B. 1937, M.A. 1938, 
Columbia; Ph.D. 1948, Cornell. [1946; 1950]) 

ANN P. KENT, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. (A.B. 1930, 
George Washington University; M.D. 1933, University of Maryland; M.P.H. 1939, 
Johns Hopkins. [1950; 1951]) 

SEYMOUR G. KLEBANOFF, Assistant Professor of Psychology. (A.B. 1937, M.S. 1939, 
Yale; Ph.D. 1947, Northwestern. [1950]) 

MARGARET KLUMPP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1928, Tufts; M.D. 1932, Cornell. [1950; 1951]; 

HEDWIG KOENIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1918, Barnard; M.A. 1920, Columbia; 
M.D. 1929, Johns Hopkins. [1935; 1944]) 

RICHARD N. KOHL, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. Assistant Attending Psychi- 
atrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1938, M.D. 1942, University of Cincinnati. [1945; 
1950]) 

MILTON L. KRAMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.b". 1926," M.D. 1929, Columbia. [1935; 1949]) 

JOHN S. LaDUE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. Associate Attending Physician, Memorial Hospital. 
(B.S. 1932, M.S. 1940, Ph.D. 1941, University of Minnesota; M.D. 1936, Harvard. 
[1947; 1948]) 

NORVELLE C. LaMAR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1921, M.D. 1925, Indiana. [1932; 1942]) 

ERNEST W. LAMPE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery; Assistant Professor of Clinical 
Anatomy. Assistant Attending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Visiting Surgeon, Belle- 
vue Hospital. (B.S. 1920, University of Minnesota; M.D. 1923, Rush Medical 
School. [1941; 1945]) 

RICHARD W. LAWTON, Assistant Professor of Physiology. (A.B. 1942,Dartmouth; 
M.D. 1944, Cornell. [1948; 1951]) 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON LEIGHTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
Assistant Attending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, Princeton; M.A. 
1934, Cambridge; M.D. 1936, Johns Hopkins. [194^]) 

LEON I. LEVINE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1918, Col- 
lege of the City of New York; M.D. 1922, Cornell. [1924; 1939]) 

MILTON I. LEVINE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1923, College of the City of New York; 
M.D. 1927, Cornell. [1933; 1944]) 

SOL S. LICHTMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1918, College of the City of New York; M.D. 
1921, Cornell. [1943; 1947]) 

E. HUGH LUCKEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Director, Second Medical 
Division, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S.1940, Union; M.D. 1944, Vanderbilt. [1948; 1950]) 

FRANK J. McGOWAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, M.D. 1921, Columbia. [1932; 1950]) 

FREDERICK C. McLELLAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). As- 
sistant Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Attending Urologist, 
New York Hospital, Westchester Division. (B.S. 1929, M.D. 1933, Dalhousir; 
M.S. 1936, Michigan. [1941; 1948]) 



22 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

GORDON P. McNEER, Assistant Professor oj Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital, (M.D. 1931, University of Pennsylvania. [1950; 1951]) 

ABRAHAM MAZUR, Assistant Professor oJ Biochemistry in Medicine. (B.S. 1932, Col- 
lege of the City of New York; M.A. 1934, Ph.D. 1938, Columbia. [1941; 1949]) 

CURTIS L. MENDELSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1934, Michigan; M.D. 1938, Cornell. [1947]) 

MARY E. MERCER, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics; Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in 
Psychiatry. Assistant Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1932, Sim- 
mons; M.D. 1943, Colorado. [1945; 1948]) 

LAURENCE MISCALL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Visiting Surgeon, 
Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.D. 1930, Cornell. [1942; 1947]) 

WALTER MODELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (B.S. 1928, College 
of the City of New York; M.D. 1932, Cornell. [1932; 1949]) 

WILLIAM L. MONEY, Assistant Professor of Physiology in Medicine. (A.B. 1941, Brown; 
Ph.D. 1947, Harvard. [1949; 1951]) 

CHARLES T. OLCOTT, Assistant Professor of Pathology. Associate Attending Pathol- 
ogist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1911, Princeton; M.D. 1916, Cornell. [1926; 1943]) 

PHILLIP OLLSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive Medi- 
cine. (M.D. 1927, Long Island College of Medicine. [1944; 1950]) 

CHARLES H. O'REGAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, St. Francis Xavier; M.D. 1928, 
McGill. [1932; 1944]) 

WARD D. O'SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1938, Fordham; M.D. 1942, Cornell. [1943; 
1951]) 

RALPH S. OVERMAN, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine. (A.B. 1938, 
University of Illinois; M.S. 1941, University of Wisconsin; Ph.D. 1942, University 
of Wisconsin. [1947; 1951]) 

DOUGLASS PALMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1909, Williams; M.D. 1915, Cornell. [1925; 
1939]) 

HERBERT PARSONS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Neurosurgery). Assistant 
Attending Surgeon (Neurosurgery), New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Sur- 
geon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Yale; M.D. 1935, Harvard. [1938; 1949]) 

JOHN B. PASTORE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Associate 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital, (A.B. 1927, Brown; 
M.D. 1931, Johns Hopkins. [1933; 1948]) 

WENDELL C. PEACOCK, Assistant Professor of Radiology (Physics). Associate Attend- 
ing Physicist, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1939, University of Utah; M.S. 1941, 
University of Washington; Ph.D. 1944, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
[1950; 1951]) 

OLOF H. PEARSON, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Physician, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1934, M.D. 1939, Harvard. [1949]) 

T. ARTHUR PEARSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. Assistant Attending 
Radiologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1930, Gustavus Adolphus; M.A. 1934, 
M.D. 1935, University of Minnesota. [1948; 1949]) 

FRANK H. PETERS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (C.E. 1915, 
Pennsylvania Mihtary College; M.D. 1920, Columbia. [1934; 1940]) 

FREDERICK S. PHILIPS, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. (B.A. 1936, Columbia; 
Ph.D. 1940, Rochester. [1948]) 

JOHN G. PIERCE, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (A.B. 1941; A.M. 1942; Ph.D. 
1944, Stanford. [1948; 1949]) 



FACULTY 23 

NORMAN PLUMMER, Assistant Professor oj Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. 
(A.B. 1922, University of California; M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1928; 1941]) 

JOHN L. POOL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1930, Princeton; M.D. 1934, Columbia. [1948]) 

CURTIS T. PROUT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. (A.B. 1921, M.D. 1924, 
Cornell; M.S. 1930, University of Michigan. [1948; 1951]) 

JOSEPH E. RALL, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Physician, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1940, North Central; M.S. 1944, Northwestern; M.D. 
1945, Northwestern. [1950; 1951]) 

GEORGE G. READER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1940, M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1946; 1950]) 

HERBERT J. RIEKERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Orthopedics). Assistant 
Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, 
Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1932, M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1942; 1946]) 

FRED V. ROCKWELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, M.D. 1936, Rochester. [1939; 1946]) 

MEYER ROSENSOHN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Asso- 
ciate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1901, 
College of the City of New York; M.D. 1909, Columbia. [1932; 1941]) 

NELSON B. SACKETT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Asso- 
ciate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1917, 
Princeton; M.D. 1923, Columbia. [1932; 1948]) 

JOHN G. SCHMIDT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Orthopedics). Associate 
Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1925, WilHams; M.D. 
1930, Harvard. [1939; 1946]) 

JOHN F. SEYBOLT, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. (B.S. 1938, Yale; M.D. 1943 
Cornell. [1947; 1951]) 

J. JAMES SMITH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Visiting Physician, 
Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1934, St. Peters; M.D. 1938, Cornell. [1939; 1946]) 

STUART S. SNYDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Ophthalmology). Assistant 
Attending Physician (Ophthalmology), New York Hospital. (B.Sc. 1941, York 
College; M.D. 1944, University of Nebraska. [1947; 1951]) 

ISRAEL STEINBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine; Assistant Professor of 
Clinical Radiology. Assistant Attending Radiologist (Angiocardiography), New York 
Hospital. (B.S. 1924, M.D. 1928, Harvard. [1940; 1949]) 

ARTHUR M. SUTHERLAND, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (A.B. 1932, 
Yale; M.D. 1936, Columbia. [1937; 1951]) 

JOHN E. SUTTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending Sur- 
geon, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 
1915, A.M. 1917, M.D. 1920, Cornell. [1923; 1950]) 

ALPHONSE E. TIMPANELLI, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate 
Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1932, Columbia; M.D. 1936, Cornell. 
[1938; 1949]) 

RALPH R. TOMPSETT, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Associate Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1934, M.D. 1939, Cornell. [1947]) 

JOHN H. TRAVIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. (M.B. 1911, University 
of Toronto. [1941; 1945]) 

NORMAN TREVES, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending Sur- 
geon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1915, A.M. 1916, Wabash College; M.D. 1920, 
Johns Hopkins. [1948; 1950]) 

FRANCES P. TWINEM, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Urology). Associate 
Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1917, Woostcr College; 
M.A. 1919, Princeton; M.D. 1925, Harvard. [1950]) 



24 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

JAMES S. TYHURST, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. (B.Sc, M.D.C.M. 
1944, McGill. [1951]) 

WALTER G. L. VERLY, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (M.D. 1947, Liege Uni- 
versity, Belgium. [1951]) 

F. STEPHEN VOGEL, Assistant Professor of Pathology; Assistant Professor of Pathology 
in Surgery. Assistant Attending Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1941, Villa- 
nova; M.D. 1944, Western Reserve. [1948; 1950]) 

WILLIAM L. WATSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon,. 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1922, M.D. 1925, Cornell. [1 940; 'l 950]) 

WILLIS M. WEEDEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive Medi- 
cine. Assistant Attending Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1916, M.D. 1919, 
Cornell. [1922; 1950]) 

LIVINGSTON WELCH, Assistant Professor of Psychology. (A.B. 1931, M.A. 1932^ 
Ph.D. 1935, Columbia. [1947]) 

EXIE E. WELSCH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Assistant Attending Psy- 
chiatrist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1930; M.D. 1932, University of Indiana. [1949]) 

W. CLARKE WESCOE, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. (B.S. 1941, Muhlenberg; 
M.D. 1944, Cornell. [1946; 1950]) 

JOHN P. WEST, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending Surgeon,. 
New York Hospital. (B.S. 1927, Alabama Polytechnic Institute; M.D. 1932, Cor- 
nell. [1938; 1949]) 

LOUIS E. WEYMULLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.Sc. 1923, M.D. 1925, University of Ne- 
braska. [1936; 1949]) 

MARJORIE A. WHEATLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, Vassar; M.D. 1929, Colum- 
bia. [1931; 1945]) 

G. DONALD WHEDON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (A.B. 1936, Hobart; 
M.D. 1941, Rochester. [1944; 1951]) 

CHARLES H. WHEELER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. Assistant Attending Physician, Memorial Hos- 
pital. (B.S. 1931, Princeton; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1936; 1944]) 

STEPHEN WHITE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. Associate Attending- 
Radiologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1920, College of the City of New York;, 
M.D. 1924, Cornell. [1931; 1944]) 

WILLET F. WHITMORE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). Assistant 
Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Assistant Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1938, Rutgers; M.D. 1942, Cornell. [1943; 1948]) 

BYARD WILLIAMS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1926, 
Williams; M.D. 1930, Columbia. [1933; 1949]) 

GEORGE A. WOLF, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital; Assistant Director for Professional Services, New 
York Hospital; Director, Out- Patient Department, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1936,. 
New York University; M.D. 1941, Cornell. [1942; 1949]) 

BENJAMIN W. ZWEIFACH, Assistant Professor of Physiology in Medicine. (B.S. 193L. 
M.S. 1933, Ph.D. 1936, New York University. [1947]) 



General Statement 



HISTORY 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE was established 
by the Board of Trustees of Cornell University on April 14, 1898, 
when they elected Dr. William M. Polk Director of the College and 
Dean of the Medical Faculty and appointed six professors. The Medical 
College was made possible by the munificence of Colonel Oliver H. 
Payne, who provided the funds for the erection of the original building, 
located at 28th Street and First Avenue, and who pledged his support 
to the new institution. For several years he provided funds for the annual 
support of the college and later placed the institution on a secure foun- 
dation by making generous provision for its permanent endowment by a 
gift of over four million dollars. 

In October, 1898, instruction began in temporary quarters. As the 
Medical College admitted a number of students to advanced standing, 
Cornell University granted the degree of Doctor of Medicine for the 
first time in 1899. 

The Cornell University Medical College from its foundation has 
xindertaken to carry out two allied activities: the development of phy- 
sicians of the best type and the extension of medical knowledge by 
means of research. The Medical Faculty has held from the beginning 
of its existence the attitude that these two functions are necessary as 
constituting a true university school. It is committed not only to conduct 
teaching of high order but also to study disease and the sciences under- 
lying medicine with the purpose of adding to medical knowledge. 



THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL-CORNELL 
MEDICAL COLLEGE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University Medical College and the New York Hospital 
have been cooperating for a long time in an arrangement for medical 
teaching. In September, 1932, however, the two institutions took up 
•occupancy in the same plant. 

The New York Hospital was founded by Royal Charter on June 13, 
1771, in the reign of King George III, and has stood throughout the life 
•of the nation as one of the foremost hospitals in the United States, as 
an institution rendering service to the sick and injured, and as a center 
of medical education. For a number of years the Hospital and the Medi- 

25 



26 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

cal College had been partially affiliated. In June, 1927, an agreement 
was entered into between Cornell University and the New York Hospi- 
tal by which the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical College Associa- 
tion was formed for the purpose of bringing together their facilities and 
cooperating in the care of patients, in medical education, and in medical 
research. In order to harmonize the interests of the Hospital and of the 
Medical College, the Joint Administrative Board was formed, consisting 
of three representatives of each institution and a seventh member elected 
by the Hospital and by the University. 

Additional endowment was secured by each institution. A group of 
buildings was erected along the East River between 68th and 71st Streets, 
adjoining the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. The new plant 
aflfords separate buildings for each of the various laboratory departments 
and includes approximately 1,182 hospital beds. Provision is made for 
medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, and psychiatry 
in five distinct clinical units. 

The Faculty of the Medical College and the professional staff of the 
Hospital are organized so as to form one body established on a university 
basis. 

The new plant affords very favorable conditions for the conduct of 
medical education, for the pursuit of medical research, and for the care 
of patients in all phases of medical practice. 

FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

From the point of view of medical instruction, the facilities provided 
by the plant of the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical College Associa- 
tion are in many respects unexcelled. The plant consists of eleven build- 
ings, joined either directly or by underground passages. These provide 
ample accommodations for the care of hospital patients, for the teaching^ 
of the clinical branches, and for the various activities connected with the 
work of the preclinical departments of the medical college. 

CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE. Instruction in the medical sciences 
is conducted in a group of buildings extending along York Avenue from 
68th to 70th Streets, centering in a court at the end of 69th Street where 
the entrance to the Medical College is located. This group comprises four 
units facing on York Avenue, each of which is five stories high. The 
extreme northern and southern buildings connect with the central group 
by means of two-story structures. In this series of buildings the one to 
the north (unit A) is devoted entirely to the department of anatomy; 
the one next to this on the south (unit B) to bacteriology and immun- 
ology; the third (unit D) to physiology; the fourth (unit E) to bio- 
chemistry and pharmacology. A seven-story building (unit C) joins the 
buildings B and D in the center, and in this are the offices of the Medical 
College, the library, and the department of pathology. This central 
building of the College is joined on all floors with the central hospital 



GENERAL STATEMENT 27 

building. Certain of the laboratories of the department of public health 
and preventive medicine are located in the two-story building which ad- 
joins the bacteriology unit to the north, but the major part of this de- 
partment is comprised in the Kips Bay-Yorkville Health Center building 
of the City of New York, located half a block west from the Medical 
College on 69th Street. 

In the main buildings of the Medical College, student laboratories and 
lecture rooms are provided on the second and third floors, and extensive 
facilities for research by staff and students are available on other floors. 
Locker rooms are provided for the use of students. A cafeteria under the 
direction of the chief dietitian of the New York Hospital is maintained 
for students and Faculty. 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL. Clinical instruction is given in the five sepa- 
rate clinics forming the New York Hospital. The medical and surgical 
clinics occupy the central hospital building, while the women's clinic, 
the pediatric clinic, and the psychiatric clinic extend from north to 
south, overlooking the East River. Each clinic contains, besides provision 
for bed patients, its own out-patient department, lecture rooms, and 
laboratories for routine study and for clinical research. Special provision 
has also been made for the laboratory work of students. The medical 
clinic occupies the second to fourth floors of the central hospital build- 
ing, with six pavilions for bed patients, three floors for its out-patient 
department, and extensive laboratories for chemical, physiological, and 
biological research. The surgical clinic occupies the pavilions from the 
fifth to the ninth floor, with out-patient and other facilities for the 
various surgical specialists. The operating rooms are on the tenth and 
eleventh floors. Above are six floors containing one hundred rooms for 
private patients, while the living quarters for the resident staff are on 
the six floors at the top of the building. The entire hospital has a capacity 
of approximately 1,182 beds. 

The head of each clinic, responsible for the care of patients and the 
conduct of professional services of the hospital, is also professor in charge 
of the corresponding department of the Medical College. Each clinical 
department is staffed in part by teachers and clinicians, including the 
professor in charge, who devote their entire time to the service of the 
College and Hospital, while other members of these departments devote 
part of their time to private practice. 

OTHER HOSPITALS FOR CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

Although the clinical teaching is conducted largely in the New York 
Hospital, advantage is also taken of special facilities afforded by other 
hospitals. In some of these hospitals the staff appointments are controlled 
by the Medical College, while in others the teaching privileges have 
been granted to the members of the staffs who are also members of the 
Medical College Faculty. 



28 THE MEDK:AL COLLEGE 

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL. Bellevuc is the central hospital of the New- 
York City Department of Hospitals. It contains 3,325 beds and is devoted 
to the treatment of acute diseases. It is organized in four divisions, one 
of which has been placed at the disposal of the Faculty of Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical Colles^e for medical instruction. The services conducted 
by the College include a medical service and a surgical service, each of 
90 beds, a urological service and a neurological service of approximately 
60 beds. The staflfs of these services are nominated by the College from 
among the members of its Faculty and teaching staff, and the Medical 
College is responsible for the professional conduct of these services. 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL. Through the generosity of the late Dr. 
James Douglas, who provided the hospital with an endowment for the 
study and treatment of cancer and allied diseases, the Memorial Hospital 
became affiliated in 1914 with Cornell University Medical College. The 
agreement between the Memorial Hospital and the College requires that 
the professional staff be named by the Council of the Medical College 
subject to the approval of the board of managers of the hospital. The 
facilities of the hospital, which are of exceptional value in the field of 
cancer, are available for study in this field by the members of the hospital 
staff, and unusual opportunities are afforded for instruction in the path- 
ology, diagnosis, and treatment of neoplastic diseases. 

MANHATTAN STATE HOSPITAL {WARD'S ISLAND). This hos- 
pital for the care and treatment of mental diseases accommodates over 
5,000 patients. Through the courtesy of the superintendent, the depart- 
ment of psychiatry is enabled to utilize this clinical material for bedside 
study of patients and for the instruction of students. 

WILLARD PARKER HOSPITAL. Instruction in infectious diseases is 
conducted at the Willard Parker Hospital, where staff positions are held 
by members of the Faculty and teaching staff who have the privilege of 
conducting medical instruction. 

LINCOLN HOSPITAL. This unit of the New York City Department of 
Hospitals has a bed capacity of 469 and facilities for handling cases in 
all divisions of clinical work. Through cooperative arrangements made 
possible by members of our teaching staff holding assignments on the 
hospital staff, a certain part of the teaching of medicine in the second 
year course is carried out on the wards of Lincoln Hospital. The abund- 
ance of clinical material and the type of disease met with in this institu- 
tion afford a valuable adjunct to the work in this part of the medical 
course. 

THE RUSSELL SAGE INSTITUTE OF PATHOLOGY 

The Institute has been associated with Cornell University Medical 
College since 1913. At first it was affiliated with the Second Medical 



GENERAL STATEMENT 29 

(Cornell) Division of Bellevue Hospital, but since 1932 it has been in 
the New York Hospital. The Institute has supported work in metabolism 
which has been conducted by the members of the departments of Medi- 
cine and Physiology. The respiration calorimeter which was operated for 
a number of years by Dr. DuBois at Bellevue Hospital has been trans- 
ferred by the directors of the Institute to the New York Hospital and 
sufficient funds have been provided for carrying on the important meta- 
bolic studies by members of the staff. The medical director of the Insti- 
tute is Dr. David P. Barr, Professor of Medicine. 

THE LOOMIS LABORATORY 

Founded in 1886 and located at 414 East 26th Street this institution 
served the purpose of undergraduate instruction in the Medical College 
and provided facilities for original research in the various departments of 
laboratory investigation. The present Medical College building contains 
space dedicated to the original Loomis Laboratory and its established 
objectives. 

THE LIBRARY 

The reading room of the library is situated on the second floor of the 
central group of laboratory buildings, directly over the entrance of the 
Medical College. The current journals are kept in racks around three 
sides of the room. The book stacks are directly behind and open to the 
reading room, extending down to the subbasement with six floors of 
stacks and accommodations for about 100,000 volumes. There are also 
a library seminar room and several rooms for the library staff". 

The library contains at present over 41,000 volumes, largely made up 
of complete sets of important journals in the fields of clinical medicine 
and the medical sciences, in English, German, and French. There are 
also well-selected collections of monographs, textbooks, and reprints. 

Several of the departments of the Medical College have libraries con- 
taining journals, monographs, and textbooks pertaining especially to the 
subject matter of the departments. These serve to supplement in a useful 
way the scope of the main library. 

The library is under the direction of a committee of the Faculty and 
in charge of a trained librarian who gives instruction to students on the 
proper methods of using the library and of searching medical literature. 

A special fund, maintained in memory of Alfred Moritz Michaelis, 
M.D. 1925, Cornell, who died the year after his graduation, is used for 
the purchase of books of cultural and historic values in medicine. 

In addition to the college library, students may obtain certain priv- 
ileges at the library of the New York Academy of Medicine, Fifth Ave- 
nue and 103rd Street, the second largest medical library in the United 
States. 



Requirements for Admission 
and Graduation 



THE FACULTY of Cornell University Medical College, in defining 
the qualifications for admission to the medical profession, attaches 
particular importance to the liberal culture and general education im- 
plied by the acquisition of a college degree. Because of the acceleration 
of college training under the Army and Navy programs during the war, 
the degree requirement was suspended. A return to the college degree 
as a prerequisite for acceptance has now been adopted by Faculty and 
Trustee action, and only the following candidates for the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine will be admitted to Cornell Medical College. 

1. Graduates of approved colleges or scientific schools; or 

2. Seniors in good standing in Cornell University or in any other 
approved college or scientific school whose faculty will permit them to 
substitute the first year of the professional course for the fourth year in 
arts and sciences, and who will confer upon them the Bachelor's degree 
upon the satisfactory completion of the first year of the course in the 
Cornell University Medical College. Students from institutions other than 
Cornell University seeking admission under this clause must have a 
statement from the Dean of their college signifying approval of this plan 
for fulfilling the requirements for the degree. Any student failing to 
receive his degree under this arrangement will not be admitted to the 
second year of the medical course. 

3. Persons who, while not possessing a Bachelor's degree, give evidence 
by examination that they have acquired an equivalent education and a 
training sufficient to enable them to profit by the instruction offered in 
the Medical College. This rule is intended to apply to students of for- 
eign universities. 

The basic premedical requirements which all students must fulfill to 
qualify for admission to the study of medicine in New York State are set 
forth in the "Regulations of the Commissioner of Education," the pert- 
inent part of which is as follows: "A candidate shall present evidence of 
having satisfactorily completed two years of study toward a liberal arts 
degree registered by the Department; or its equivalent as determined by 
the Commissioner. The required two years of college study shall include 
at least 6 semester hours each in English, physics, biology or zoology, 
and general chemistry, and 3 semester hours in organic chemistry." 

Although the requirements outlined above form the basis of eligibility 

30 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 31 

for admission to the medical course, they should be considered as repre- 
senting the irreducible minimum. The list contains a total of twenty- 
seven credit points which probably represents sufficient time to enable 
the student to obtain a basic preparation in these different fields. In 
many colleges, however, additional credits in one or more of these de- 
partments are required of the candidate in order to satisfy major require- 
ments for the degree. In making the choice of elective courses, consider- 
ation should be given to the principle that thorough training in the 
sciences is essential. On the other hand, choosing too many elective 
courses in these departments may not provide the most acceptable prep- 
aration for medicine, since it tends to limit the time available for study 
in other departments offering work of a broad educational value. 
Students planning to study medicine should bear in mind that bacteri- 
ology, immunology, human physiology, and abnormal psychology are 
properly subjects of the medical and not of the premedical curriculum. 
In planning premedical work students are advised to elect subjects which 
will lay a broad foundation for medical study rather than to anticipate 
courses required as a part of the medical curriculum. 

As a general rule the courses given in professional schools of pharmacy, 
veterinary medicine, optometry, and agriculture are not considered as 
fulfilling adequately the admission requirements. 

APPLICATIONS FOR ADMISSION 

All requests for application forms and inquiries regarding dates for 
submitting applications should be addressed to the Committee on Admis- 
sions, 1300 York Avenue, New York City. In making application for 
admission, the regular form issued for this purpose must be filled out and 
submitted to the Office of Admissions. Candidates are accepted for only 
one class in advance. With the large number of students making appli- 
cation in recent years, it has been necessary to assign a definite period 
for distributing application forms. For the class entering in September, 
1952, the release of forms in response to requests will begin on August 
1 and continue until January 15, 1952. Applications must be submitted 
prior to March 1, 1952, to receive consideration by the Committee on 
Admissions. 

A charge of $5.00 is made for submitting an application. This fee 
should be made payable to Cornell University Medical College in the 
form of a check or money order and is not returnable. 

Applications are passed upon by the Committee on Admissions after 
all credentials have been filed. As soon as the Committee takes favorable 
action upon an applicant, a letter of acceptance is immediately forwarded 
to him, and the accepted applicant is required to make a deposit of $50 
within a specified time. This deposit is not returnable but is credited 
toward the first tuition payment. If the accepted student fails to make 



32 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

this deposit within the stipulated time, he forfeits his place on the class 
roll. 

It is impossible for the Committee on Admissions to hold personal 
conferences with all candidates for admission as the number is too great^ 
but selected individuals from the group of applicants receive an invita- 
tion to appear before members of the Committee. 

A student who has previously attended another medical school and 
has been dropped for poor scholarship or unfavorable conduct is not an 
acceptable candidate for admission to any class in Cornell Medical Col- 
lege. It is inadvisable, therefore, for one with this background to go 
through the formality of submitting an application. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

When vacancies occur, students may be admitted to advanced stand- 
ing. 

Application for a place in one of the upper classes should be filed 
according to the procedure described for admission to the first year class. 
Accepted applicants are required to make the deposit of $50. Applicants 
must not only furnish acceptable evidence of having satisfactorily com- 
pleted in an approved medical school all of the work required of 
students of the class they wish to enter, but also of having completed 
the conditions of admission to the first year class at Cornell University 
Medical College. They must present a certificate of honorable dismissal 
from the medical school or schools they have attended, and they may 
be required to take examinations in any of the medical courses taken at 
another school. 

Although a certain number of students are regularly admitted from 
other institutions to enter the third year class at Cornell University Medi- 
cal College, rarely have there been acceptances made of students to 
enter the fourth year on the basis of work at another medical school. 
Candidates seeking admission to the fourth year are required to come 
before the clinical departments for a thorough examination before final 
action is taken on their applications. 

Persons who have received the degree of Doctor of Medicine at an- 
other institution will not be accepted as candidates for this degree at 
Cornell University Medical College. Likewise, persons who have finished 
all or part of the course in dentistry and seek a transfer to medicine are 
discouraged from making application here since Cornell does not have 
a department of dentistry and makes no provision for adapting the 
teaching in this subject to the medical curriculum. 

ADVANCEMENT AND EXAMINATION 

The entire medical curriculum is arranged in four courses, or academic 
years, and the student advances in steps of an academic year at a time. 



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34 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

It is necessary that he complete all the subjects listed in a given academic 
year before taking up the next succeeding group of subjects, and to be 
readmitted to the Medical College in one of the advanced years (second, 
third, or fourth) he must be approved for promotion by the Faculty. 

Any student who by quality of work or conduct indicates an unfitness 
to enter the profession of medicine may, at the discretion of the Faculty, 
be required at any time to withdraw from the Medical College. 

At the close of the academic year examinations are given in all subjects 
except those extending: through a part of the year only, in which exam- 
inations may be held at the close of the course in the hours allotted there- 
to. In making up a student's rating in a given course, all work covered 
in that subject during the year is taken into account and due weight 
assigned to the effort he puts in his work, his seriousness of purpose, and 
his scholastic resourcefulness, as well as the results of the final examina- 
tion. 

A final rating is made for each student at the end of the academic 
year, based on the results of his performance in all courses in the cur- 
riculum of that year. These final ratings of students are made on the 
recommendations of the Committee on Promotion and Graduation; then 
they are reviewed and formally acted on by the Faculty. The Faculty 
ratings classify all students of the medical course under one of four 
s:roups as follows: 

1. Students with no encumbrances in any subject are recorded as 
"passed." This rating confers eligibility for readmission into the Medical 
College in the next higher class, unless by reason of conduct the Faculty 
considers the student unsuited for the medical profession. 

2. Students with an unsatisfactory rating in 40 per cent or more of 
the required hours in a given year are recorded as "not passed." A rating 
of "not passed" carries ineligibility for readmission into the Medical 
College. 

3. Students with an unsatisfactory rating in less than 40 per cent of 
the required hours of a given year are recorded as "conditioned." A 
"conditioned" student has failures in certain required courses, and he 
may be reexamined in these subjects, but only after pursuing additional 
work under the direction of the head of the department in which a 
failure has occurred. Students who fail on reexaminations are ineligible 
for readmission into the Medical College, unless under special circum- 
stances they are permitted by the Faculty to repeat courses in which 
their work is deficient. 

4. Students with uniformly low grades in most subjects of the course 
for two years or more are subject to special review by the Faculty, and 
any student with a record of this kind may be deemed unqualified to 
enter the medical profession. A rating in this group carries ineligibility for 
readmission into the Medical College. 

It is a well-established policy of the Medical College to make no 



EXAMINATIONS FOR MEDICAL LICENSURE 35 

announcement to students of grades received in any subject of the medi- 
cal course. At the close of each academic year, however, students are 
informed of the quarter of the class in which their weighted average 
score places them in the order of class standing. 

A transcript of the Medical College record of a student or graduate 
will be mailed on his request to accredited hospitals and to educational 
or other well-recognized institutions as credentials in support of his 
application for a position or promotion. All transcripts are marked "con- 
fidential" and carry the instructions that they are not to be turned over 
to the candidate. This ruling is for the purpose of avoiding possible loss 
and fraudulent use of an official document of the Medical College. The 
Medical College makes no charge for sending out transcripts of record. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine must have at- 
tained the age of twenty-one years and be of good moral character. 

They must have completed successfully four full courses of at least 
eight months each as regular matriculated medical students, the last of 
which must have been in Cornell University Medical College. They must 
have satisfactorily completed all the required work of the medical cur- 
riculum and must have passed all prescribed examinations. At the end 
of the fourth year every student who has fulfilled these requirements will 
be recommended to the President and Trustees of Cornell University for 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

EXAMINATIONS FOR MEDICAL LICENSURE 

Graduates of Cornell University Medical College are admitted uncon- 
ditionally to the examinations for license to practice medicine in all 
states of the United States. 

Students and graduates of Cornell University Medical College are 
admitted to the examinations of the National Board of Medical Exam- 
iners, whose certificate is recognized by the respective authorities of 
England, Scotland, and Ireland. Although national in scope and organ- 
ized under the laws of the District of Columbia, the National Board of 
Medical Examiners is not to be confused as a Federal Government 
agency. For information write to the National Board of Medical Exam- 
iners, 225 South Fifteenth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



General Information 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

All fees for instruction and other charges are paid at the Business 
Office of the Medical College, Room F-106, 1300 York Avenue, New 
York 21, N.Y. 

Veterans receiving Federal or State educational benefits are required 
to report to the Veterans Affairs Office, Room A-131, immediately 
after registering. 

APPLICATION FEE 

A charge made for reviewing an application . . . $ 5.00 

ACCEPTANCE DEPOSIT 50.00 

Each student admitted is given notice of favorable action on 
his application and a limited time (usually two weeks) in 
which to decide if he will enroll in the entering class. His name 
is not placed on the class list until the acceptance fee is paid. 
The fee is credited toward the tuition charge and is not return- 
able if the student fails to enter. 



MATRICULATION FEE (payable only once) . 10.00 

TUITION FEE, for academic year ... 800.00 

This charge is payable at the beginning of the academic year, 
or in three equal parts, the first of which must be made at 
registration. For fourth year students in the academic year of 
1951-52, the first installment will be due on or before Septem- 
ber 14. No refund or rebate will be made in any instance. 

STUDENT HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE, for calen- 
dar year 14.88 

This insurance is carried through the Associated Hospital 
Service (Blue Cross plan) and may be extended to wives and 
families of married students at additional cost. This compulsory 
insurance plan assures a limited period of care to all students 
during the time they are members in good standing in the 
Medical College. 

36 



GENERAL INFORMATION 37 

BREAKAGE DEPOSIT 10.00 

This deposit is required of first and second year students at 
the beginning of each academic year and will be returned, less 
the amount charged for breakage, at the end of the second year. 

GRADUATION FEE 25.00 

This charge is payable two months before graduation. 

BOOKS AND INSTRUMENTS, EXCLUSIVE OF MICROSCOPES 

The average cost is approximately $110 a year, distributed as follows: 
first year, $140; second year, $215; third year, $50; fourth year, $30. 

MICROSCOPES 

Each student is required to provide himself with a microscope of an 
approved type. The College Book Store handles all makes, and students 
placing their orders here are given every consideration in the purchase 
price on the instrument they select. 

The Board of Trustees of Cornell University reserves the right to 
change the schedule of fees of the Medical College when deemed expe- 
dient. 

RESIDENCE AND LIVING EXPENSES 

Accommodations are available for 220 students in temporary quarters 
pending completion of a student residence. In these facilities the rooms 
are ample in size, and each provides space to accommodate two students. 
The location is within one block of the Medical College. The rental 
rate is $200.00 per academic year per student, payable in three equal 
parts. Applications may be made for room reservations at the time of 
acceptance to enter the Medical College. 

Cafeterias in the Medical College and the New York Hospital afford 
facilities for students to obtain well-balanced meals at a conservatively 
low price in comparison with New York City costs. 

For students planning to take up the study of medicine, the problem 
of financing the course is often a difficult one to solve. Although experi- 
ence in the undergraduate college may suggest the possibility of supple- 
menting resources by carrying on outside work during the medical course, 
there is ample evidence to show that a student's entire time and undi- 
vided attention are required for study. It is unwise, therefore, to depend 
upon earning any part of one's expenses during the college year. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Members of the first year class and students transferred to advanced 
standing from other colleges are required to have a physical examination 
by a member of the Student Health Staff. In addition, each student in 



38 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

the Medical College must report once a year for an X-ray examination 
of the lungs. All members of the fourth year class are called for a reex- 
amination and a careful check of the findinijs made with those presented 
at the time the student entered. Students pay no fee for the yearly X-ray 
examination, nor for the services of the Student Health Staff, but they 
are charged for any special X-ray studies. Office hours are held from one 
to two o'clock daily by the Student Health Staff. Health records are 
kept and students advised concerning their physical condition and gen- 
eral health. All cases of illness must be reported to the College office. 
Students may have in attendance physicians of their own choice, but a 
reasonable amount of cooperation between such physicians and the Col- 
lege's Health Service is expected. 

PRIZES 

1. FOR GENERAL EFFICIENCY. In commemoration of John Met- 
calfe Polk, an instructor in this college who was graduated from Cornell 
University Medical College June 7, 1899, and died on March 29, 1904, 
prizes wall be presented at each commencement to the three students 
having the highest standing for the four years' work. Only those who 
have taken the full course of study at Cornell University Medical College 
are eligible. The first prize is $250, the second $100, and the third $50. 

2. FOR EFFICIENCY IN OPHTHALMOLOGY. Two prizes, the first 
of $50, the second of $25, are offered by Professor Bernard Samuels to 
the two students of the graduating class who make the best records in 
ophthalmology. 

3. FOR EFFICIENCY IN OTOLARYNGOLOGY. Two prizes, the 
first of $50, the second of $25, are offered by members of the staff" of 
otolaryngology to the two students of the graduating class who make 
the best record in this specialty. 

4. FOR EFFICIENCY IN OBSTETRICS. Two prizes, the first of $50, 
the second of $25, have been endowed by an anonymous donor in recog- 
nition of the work of Dr. Gustav Seeligman, in obstetrics, to be given to 
the tw^o students of the graduating class who have made the best records 
in obstetrics. 

5. FOR EFFICIENCY IN GENERAL MEDICINE. The income from 
$1000 is offered as a prize for general efficiency in the department of 
medicine, in commemoration of Alfred Moritz Michaelis, who was grad- 
uated from Cornell University Medical College on June 11, 1925, and 
who died during his internship at Mt. Sinai Hospital, April 24, 1926. 
Presented at each commencement to a memiber of the graduating class 
who has pursued the full course at Cornell University Medical College. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 39 

6. THE MARY ALDRICH FUND. In memory of William Mecklen- 
burg Polk, M.D., LL.D., first dean of the Medical College, two prizes 
are ofTered for proficiency in research to regularly matriculated students 
of the Cornell University Medical College, the first of $150, and the 
second of $50. Members of all classes are eligible for these prizes. 

The awards are made at the end of each academic year for the best 
report presented in writing of research work done by students, or for 
valuable reviews and logical presentations on medical subjects not to 
be found fully considered in a single text or reference book. If the papers 
submitted are not considered worthy of special commendation the prizes 
will be withheld. 

Papers are submitted in quadruplicate in a sealed envelope marked 
"Dean William Mecklenburg Polk Memorial Prize Committee" and 
must be in the Administrative Office not later than two weeks prior to 
the end of each academic year. 

The committee of awards for this prize consists of two members of 
the Faculty from laboratory departments, and two from clinical de- 
partments. 

For 1951 the William Mecklenburg Polk Prize awards for Research 
were : First Prize : Wilbur Dayton Hagamen, Jr. ; Second Prize : Douglas 
James Roberts, Jr. 

7. THE WILLIAM C. THRO MEMORIAL FUND. Established in 
memory of William C. Thro of the class of 1901 whose all-absorbing 
interest in and devotion to clinical pathology found expression in the 
teaching and practice of this subject in his alma mater continuously from 
1910 to 1938. This prize award is to be given to the student showing the 
best record in the course in clinical pathology. The candidate for the 
prize is to be recommended by the professor of clinical pathology and 
the award made by the Committee on Prizes and Scholarships. 

8. THE HERMAN L. JACOBIUS PRIZE IN PATHOLOGY. Estab- 
lished in 1945 by a gift from Dr. Lawrence Jacobius and his friends in 
memory of his son who was killed in action in the Netherlands on Sep- 
tember 28, 1944. Dr. Herman L. Jacobius was a member of the class of 
1939. The income of the fund is available annually to the student of the 
third or fourth year class who, in the opinion of the stafT of the depart- 
ment of pathology, merits recognition for high scholastic attainments and 
outstanding performance in the subject of pathology. If in any year no 
student merits the distinction the award will be withheld. 

9. THE BORDEN UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH AWARD. The 
terms of this grant by The Borden Company Foundation, Inc., provide 
for awards of $500 during any one calendar year for a period of five 
years. The award will be made imder the followins: terms and conditions: 



40 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

1. All persons in the graduating class of the Medical College of Cornell Univer- 
sity who, during any year while enrolled in the College, have carried out under- 
graduate research in the medical field shall be eligible for the Borden Undergrad- 
uate Research Award in Medicine. The Award shall be presented at the time of 
his graduation to that eligible person whose research has been determined by the 
Medical College to be the most meritorious performed by all similarly ehgible 
persons. Originality and thoroughness of research shall be of primary consideration. 

2. In the event that the Dean shall find it inappropriate to make the Award in 
any one year, the Award may be deferred to a further year. Only one award, 
however, will be made during any one calendar year. 

Papers submitted for this prize should be in triplicate and must be in 
the Administrative Office not later than two weeks prior to the end of 
the academic year. 

The Borden Prize for Research for the year of 1951 was awarded to 
Robert Louis Hirsch. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

L THE JOHN METCALFE POLK SCHOLARSHIP. A gift under 
the wull of William Mecklenburg Polk, the first Dean of the Medical 
College, is awarded annually by the Faculty. The scholarship amounts 
to about $200 a year. 

2. THE THORN E SHAW SCHOLARSHIP FUND. This fund pro- 
vides three scholarships designated as: 

First: A scholarship of approximately $400 a\ailable to students after 

at least two years of study in the Medical College. 
Second: Two scholarships of approximately $200 each available to 

students after at least one year of study in the Medical College. 
These scholarships are awarded by the Faculty upon nomination by 
the Committee on Scholarships and Prizes. They are awarded annually 
in June and are for one year only. Students receiving the scholarships are 
notified of the award at the end of the session, 

3. MARY F. HALL SCHOLARSHIP. The income, amounting to about 
$180 annually, from a fund established by bequest of Miss Mary F. Hall, 
is available to any woman student in Cornell University Medical College 
who needs its aid and who is bona fide resident of the State of New York 
and was such prior to admission to the College. 

4. THE 1936 JOHN AND KATHERINE MAYER SCHOLARSHIP 
FUND. A five thousand dollar fund established in 1936, the income from 
which is annually available to meritorious students who need its aid, and 
who have completed one or more years of the regular medical course. 
The award is for one year only, but tenable for a second or third year 
proxiding the qualifications of the candidate merit a reaward. If during 
any year the income from the fund is not used as stated above, then it may 



GENERAL INFORMATION 41 

be used for such research work, or otherwise, as in the judgment of the 
Facuhy (or Trustees) may be deemed best. 

5. THE 1939 JOHN AND KATHERINE MAYER SCHOLARSHIP 
FUND. A five thousand dollar fund established in 1939, the income from 
which is annually available to meritorious students who need its aid, and 
who have completed one or more years of the regular medical course. 
The award is for one year only, but tenable for a second or third year 
providing the qualifications of the candidate merit a reaward. If during 
any year the income from the fund is not used as stated above, then it 
may be used for such research work, or otherwise, as in the judgment of 
the Faculty (or Trustees) may be deemed best. 

6. THE JEREMIAH S. FERGUSON SCHOLARSHIP. Established in 
memory of Jeremiah S. Ferguson, who throughout his long connection 
with the Medical College, of somewhat more than forty years, devoted 
much effort to helping students with their individual problems and pro- 
moting their professional careers. The fund amounts to $5000, the income 
from which, approximately $200 a year, is awarded annually by the Com- 
mittee on Scholarships and Prizes to a student or students in the third and 
fourth year classes in the Medical College who are in need of financial 
aid and who by conduct and scholarship have proved worthy investments. 

7. THE CHARLES RUPERT STOCKARD SCHOLARSHIP. A ten 
thousand dollar fund was established in 1939 by a friend of the late 
Charles Rupert Stockard, Professor of Anatomy in the Cornell University 
Medical College, 1911-1939. The interest of this fund is to be awarded 
either to one student (approximately $400) or to two students (approxi- 
mately $200 each) who have shown promise in the work in the depart- 
ment of anatomy and who are desirous of doing advanced work in this 
department. The scholarships are to be awarded by the Executive Fac- 
ulty upon nomination by the head of the department of anatomy. 

8. THE DR. JOHN A. HEIM SCHOLARSHIPS. Established under 
the will of John A. Heim of the class of 1905 to provide such number of 
scholarships in the Medical College as there shall be funds available for 
that purpose. The awards are to be made to regularly matriculated medi- 
cal students who are in need of financial assistance, as provided for in 
the terms of the bequest. 

First year students are eligible, provided they meet the standards pre- 
scribed. 

9. THE DR. CHARLES L HYDE '10 AND EVA HYDE SCHOLAR- 
SHIP FUND. Established in memory of their daughter, Anita Shirley 



42 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Hyde. The terms of this endowment provide that the income be available 
annually to meritorious students who have completed one year of the 
regular medical course and are in need of assistance. It is further stipu- 
lated by the donors that the scholarship be available at once; that they 
propose to subscribe $75 annually for this purpose until such time as the 
terms of the bequest become effective; and that if during any year the 
income from the fund shall not be used for scholarship purposes, the 
same may be used for research work or otherwise as may be determined 
by the Board of Trustees after consultation by the President of the Uni- 
versity and the Dean of the College. 

10. THE DR. JACQUES SAPHIER SCHOLARSHIP FUND. Estab- 
lished in memory of Dr. Jacques Conrad Saphier (Lieutenant, j.g., 
USNR) of the class of 1940, who was killed in action on August 21, 1942,. 
at Guadalcanal while in the performance of his duty. The income from 
this fund shall be awarded annually to a meritorious student of the Cor- 
nell University Medical College who has completed at least one year of 
work, who needs its aid, and who, in the opinion of the Faculty merits 
the recognition for which this scholarship was established. 

11. THE ELISE STRANG UESPERANCE SCHOLARSHIP. This 
award is maintained by the personal contributions of Dr. Elise Strang 
L'Esperance, whose interests in the educational advancements of the 
Medical College have continued for many years. The value of this schol- 
arship is $1000, and the award is to be given annually to the most out- 
standing woman medical student in the fourth year class in Cornell 
University Medical College. The selection of the recipient of this schol- 
arship is to be made by the Dean in consultation with persons suggested 
under the original donation. 

12. THE SAGAN FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP. An annual schol- 
arship of $500 to be awarded to a student in Cornell University Medical 
College, to be selected by the College on the basis of scholarship and 
need, without reference to race, color, sex, or creed. In the event the 
Foundation should discontinue the award, at least one year's notice shall 
be given the Medical College. A special blank issued by the Sagan 
Foundation should be obtained from the Dean's Office by students mak- 
ing application for this scholarship. 

13. RUTH HOLLOHAN SCHOLARSHIP FUND. This fund was es- 
tablished by the terms of the will of Jessie L. Hollohan in memory of 
Ruth Hollohan. The income is to be used for scholarships for students in 
the Medical College, with first consideration to be given to entering: 
students of good scholarship who are in need of financial assistance. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 43, 

BURSARY FOR WOMEN STUDENTS 

THE MARIE AND JOHN ZIMMERMAN FUND. A sum from this 
fund will be available this year to certain women students as a memorial 
to Marie Zimmerman, Sr. The candidates will be chosen in accordance 
with the purposes of the donor as set forth in the following terms: 

"It is the desire of the Fund that Dr. Connie M. Guion and the As- 
sistant Dean assign the proceeds of the donations to one or more women 
medical students who are financially in need of assistance and whose 
academic standing leads them to believe that the recipients of the awards 
wiU make a success in their profession." 

The objectives and method of assigning these awards will follow the 
principles accompanying the donations received during the present year. 

LOAN FUNDS 

1. THE 1923 LOAN FUND. This fund am^ounts to $350 a year and is 
available as a loan to students needing financial assistance, preferably to 
a third year student. 

2. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION LOAN FUNDS. The Alumni Associa- 
tion of the Medical College is able to aid a few students in meeting their 
expenses by the Jessie P. Andresen Memorial Fund and the Class Student 
Loan Funds. The loans made from these funds will be administered bv 
the Board of Directors of the Alumni Association. The Medical College 
is consulted in making these awards. Students in the upper classes will 
be given preference. 

3. STUDENT LOAN FUND. A revolving fund contributed through 
different sources including The Kellogg Foundation and The Charles 
Hayden Foundation is available to students in all classes who are in need 
of assistance. Every effort is made within the limitations of the financial 
structure of the institution to help students who by reason of unforeseen 
circumstances get into money difficulties. A special committee considers 
each case on its individual merits. A student having indebtedness to the 
Medical College in other ways than formal loans is ineligible for gradu- 
ation. 

ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA 

Alpha Omega Alpha is a nonsecret Medical College Honor Society, 
membership in which is based upon scholarship, moral qualifications 
being satisfactory. It was organized at the College of Medicine of the 
University of Illinois, Chicago, August 25, 1902. A.O.A. is the only order 
of its kind on this continent. 

Elections are made from students who have fully completed 2 years of 
a four-year curriculum, by unanimous vote of the active members acting 



44 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

on recommendations made by Faculty advisers. Not more than one-sixth 
of any class may be elected. As aspects of and indispensable to true 
scholarship are included open-mindedness, individuality, originality, 
demonstration of studious attitude, and promise of intellectual growth. 

The Cornell Chapter of A.O.A. was organized May 2, 1910. A large 
number of the Faculty are members. The Chapter sponsors an annual 
open lecture delivered in the Medical College Auditorium on a cultural 
or historical phase of medicine. 

The members elected from the graduating class of 1951 are the fol- 
lowing : 

Stanley Birnbaum Alfred W. Kopf 

George H. Carman Roger P. Lochhead 

Esther M. Fincher Thomas A. McGraw 

Frederic F. Flach Kenneth Roth 

Jack M. Gershberg Paul R. vom Eigen 

AVilliam H. Jeffreys Carl Wierum 

SIGMA XI 

Sigma Xi, a national honorary society devoted to the encouragement 
of scientific research, was founded at Cornell University at Ithaca in 1886. 
An active branch of the Cornell Chapter is maintained at the Medical 
College. Many members of the Faculty and research staff are members 
of Sigma Xi and share in the activities of the Cornell Chapter. Medical 
students are eligible for election to membership in Sigma Xi on the basis 
of proved ability to carry on original medical research and on nomination 
by active members of the Cornell Chapter. As part of its program for 
the encouragement of medical research, the Cornell Chapter sponsors 
an annual lecture to the staff and student body by an outstanding in- 
vestigator in the field of medical science. 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Officers 

Paul Reznikoff, '20 President 

Irving S. Wright, '26 Vice President 

Mary Ann Payne, '45 Secretary 

Henry A. Carr, '25 Treasurer 

Directors 

Three-Year Term. William H. Cassebaum, '31; Alphonse E. Timpa- 
nelli, '36. 

Two-Year Term. Horace S. Baldwin, '21 ; Edward V. Denneen, '25. 
One-Year Term. William D. Stubenbord, '31; Preston A. Wade, *25. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



4S 



Alumni Quarterly 



David N. Barrows, '12 
Willis M. Weeden, '19 
Edward F. Stanton, '35 
Miss Mary E. Gleason 



Editor 

Associate Editor 
Associate Editor 
Executive Secretary 



Each graduate of Cornell University Medical College is automatically 
considered a member of the Alumni Association, and the dues are $5 a 
year. The activities of the Association include a quarterly publication, an 
annual banquet, student and faculty parties, student loan funds, and an 
employment bureau. The Association maintains an office at 1300 York 
Avenue. 

A scholarship is available each year to a student recommended by the 
College, and an annual appeal for funds for the use of the Medical Col- 
lege is made to members of the Association. 



Educational Policies 
and Plan of Instruction 



The Medical College is divided into thirteen major departments, six 
of which are primarily concerned with the sciences underlying clinical 
medicine. They are anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, bacteriology and 
immunology, pathology, and pharmacology. Seven departments have as 
their major functions the study, treatment, and prevention of human 
diseases, and maternity care. These are medicine, surgery, pediatrics, 
psychiatr\', obstetrics and gynecology, public health, and preventive 
medicine. 

The heads of these major departments, together with the President of 
the University and the Dean, constitute the Executive Faculty, which is 
responsible for the educational policies of the College. 

Courses required to be completed by each student before the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine is conferred by Cornell University are offered by each 
department. These courses are arranged, in their sequence and duration, 
to develop logically the knowledge and training of students and to build 
up gradually the requirements needed for graduation as Doctor of Medi- 
cine. The various departments also offer courses and opportunities for 
special study open to regular medical students, to candidates for ad- 
vanced degrees in the Graduate School of Cornell University, and to 
qualified advanced students of medicine not candidates for degrees. 

Medical knowledge is so extensive that only a small part of that 
needed for a successful career in medicine can be acquired during the 
time devoted to medical study by the medical college curriculum. The 
time devoted by the prospective physician to his preparation for the 
practice of medicine includes at least one and often many more years of 
graduate medical education as intern or resident of a hospital, either in 
clinical or laboratory work or both. The required period of study at Cor- 
nell University Medical College extends over four academic years of at 
least thirty-three weeks each. It is planned that studies may be pursued 
during vacation periods. This will provide an opportunity to shorten 
the time necessary to complete all required courses and allow more time 
for elective work. Study in other medical schools may also be arranged 
during the course if opportunities can be found. 

As medical science and medical practice may be pursued in a variety 
of ways, it is the policy of the College to encouras^e the student to vary 
his course of study according to his special interests and particular talents 

46 



EDUCATIONAL POLICIES 47 

as far as is consistent with meeting the requirements for the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. 

A thesis is not required for the degree of Doctor of Medicine, but 
students are encouraged to engage in individual work as far as their time 
permits, with the hope that they may accomplish results worthy of publi- 
cation. It is desirable therefore for some students to devote all their free 
time to a single subject in which they have a special interest. 

The development of technical and scientific proficiency in the various 
special fields of clinical medicine is not encouraged during the regular 
medical course but must await adequate training after graduation. 

The first year of study is devoted to anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, 
bacteriology, and psychobiology. 

In the second year, the subjects of physiology and bacteriology are 
completed, and the student takes up work in parasitology, pathology, 
pharmacology, physical diagnosis, psychiatry, neurology, clinical path- 
ology, public health, ophthalmology, radiology, and surger)\ 

During the third and fourth years, students are divided into small 
groups for practical work in the various clinics and for elective work. 
The third year class meets at noon each day for clinical lectures and 
demonstrations. 

Time for elective work is provided in the fourth year, after students 
have had opportunities to acquire some knowledge of the medical sci- 
ences and of clinical medicine. Students are advised to consult informallv 
members of the Faculty in regard to the use of their time for elective 
work. It is deemed best not to establish a formal advisory system. 

It is anticipated that, beginning in 1952, the fourth year will be in- 
creased to 45 weeks. 

The Faculty expressly reserves the right to make alterations in the 
curriculum whenever advisable and without previous notice to students. 



Description of Courses 



ANATOMY 

JOSEPH C. HINSEY, Professor of Anatomy. 

CHARLES V. MORRILL, Professor cf Anatomy. 

CHARLES BERRY, Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

JOHN MacLeod, Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

JOHN J. BIESELE, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

WILLIAM A. GEOHEGAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Anatomy. 

LAWRENCE W. HANLON, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

ERNEST W. LAMPE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Anatomy. 

JOHN F. SEYBOLT, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

WILBUR D. HAGAMEN, Instructor in Anatomy. 

IRENA KOPROWSKA, Research Fellow in Anatomy. 

DAVID ANDERSON, Assistant in Anatomy. 

EMBRYOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY ... The work in embryology 
presupposes a general knowledge of the subject, particularly that of the 
early development of the chick. It embraces a thorough study of the de- 
velopment of the mammalian embryo in the light of our knowledge of 
the evolution of the human body. Malformations resulting from develop- 
mental disturbances are broadly considered. The course is closely cor- 
related with that of gross anatomy. 

The work in histology includes the histogenesis and microscopic struc- 
tures of all organs of the human body with the exception of the central 
nervous system (see Neuro-anatomy) . Emphasis is laid on relation of 
structure to function. 

The tissues are studied principally by means of stained sections and 
practice is given in rapid identification of their diagnostic features. 
Demonstrations of living material are made, and opportunities are of- 
fered for acquiring the essentials of histological technique. 

Laboratory and lectures, 180 hours, first and second terms. Required 
of all first year students. 

NEURO-ANATOMY ... A laboratory course on the gross and micro- 
scopic anatomy of the human nervous system. Special emphasis is laid 
on the more important pathways and their functions. 

Laboratory and demonstrations, 84 hours. Required of all first year 
students during the second term, 

GROSS ANATOMY OF THE HUMAN BODY . . . This is taught 
by means of laboratory exercises and dissections. The required work in- 

48 



ANATOMY 49 

eludes: (a) dissection of the part; (b) demonstrations, study, and dis- 
cussion upon dissected and prepared specimens. 

Total laboratory hours, 374. First and second terms of the first year. 
Required of all first year students. 

ELECTIVE COURSES . . . Subject to the approval of the department 
of anatomy, its equipment is available to medical students wishing to 
pursue advanced work or research in anatomical subjects. Members of 
the staff will direct the progress of such undertakings. Schedules to fit 
individual cases will be arranged for a limited number of third and 
fourth year students who may devote the major part or all of their elec- 
tive time in this department. Such elective time may be devoted to one 
of the foUov/ing: (1) a review of dissection; (2) dissection of a foetus; 
(3) microscopic anatomy; (4) embryology; (5) special research prob- 
lems. 

COURSES OPEN TO SPECIAL STUDENTS 

GROSS ANATOMY ... A limited number of graduates in medicine 
will be provided with material for dissection of the human body. Fee, 
$50 for a term of ten weeks; or for entire dissection, $100. 

COURSE IN SURGICAL ANATOMY . . . This course consists of an 
extensive review of surgical anatomy with demonstrations and dissections. 
It is specially designed for candidates for the American Board of Surgery 
and is in charge of Dr. Ernest W. Lampe. The fee for the course, which 
includes matriculation, registration charges, and tuition, is $200, and 
the course will be for a period of four weeks. The size of the class is 
limited to 25 persons. Inquiries may be directed to Office of the Dean, 
Cornell Universitv Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York 
21, N.Y. 

COURSE IN CYTOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS OF CANCER . . . This 
course consists of training in the technique and interpretation of smear's 
prepared from various body fluids, with discussions and laboratory work. 
It is designed for qualified physicians and laboratory workers. The teach- 
ing is done by Dr. George N. Papanicolaou and associates. The fee for 
the course, including tuition, matriculation, and administration charges, 
is $300. Two courses of three months each will be given this year, begin- 
ning in September and in March. The size of the classes is limited to 
15 persons. Inquiries may be directed to Dr. John F. Seybolt, Cornell 
University Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York 21, N.Y. 

ANATOMICAL RESEARCH . . . Subject to special arrangement with 
the head of the department. 



BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 

JAMES M. NEILL. Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. 
EDWARD J. HEHRE, Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. 
JOHN Y. SUGG, Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. 
5 Instructor in Bacteriology and Immunology. 

The course is given in the third term of the first year and in the first 
term of the second year. Emphasis is placed upon the aspects of micro- 
biology and immunology that are pertinent to an understanding of the 
infectious diseases. 

FIRST YEAR . . . The laboratory work includes a survey of repre- 
sentative morphological groups of pathogenic bacteria, a study of the 
microbial flora of the upper respiratory and lower intestinal tracts of 
healthy persons, and experiments on the mechanisms involved in antigen- 
antibody reactions. The lectures are directed toward the establishment 
of general concepts, particularly the principles involved in microbial 
growth, the principles underlying active immunization, and the factors 
that enter into host-parasite relationships. 
Lectures and laboratory: 55 hours. 

SECOND YEAR ... In this term a more intensive study is made of the 
agents of specific infections, including fungi, spirochetes, rickettsiae, and 
viruses, as well as bacteria. General concepts introduced in the first term 
are further developed by applying them to the specific diseases. Labora- 
tory work with material from patients is included, not only to acquaint 
the student with the technical procedures, but to illustrate the applica- 
tion of fundamental principles to practical methods. The action of 
chemotherapeutic agents, especially those of microbial origin, are con- 
sidered. 

Lectures, laboratory, and conference: 88 hours. 

ELECTIVE COURSES . . . The department will arrange a schedule 
of work for fourth year students who wish to devote their electi\'e time 
to microbiology and immunology. 



50 



BIOCHEMISTRY 

VINCENT DU VIGNEAUD, Professor of Biochemistry. 
ROY W. BONSNES, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 
GEORGE B. BROWN, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 
DONALD B. MELVILLE, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 
JULIAN R. RACHELE, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 
HELENA GILDER, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 
JOHN G. PIERCE, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 
WALTER G. L. VERLY, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 
DOROTHY S. GENGHOF, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 
CHARLOTTE RESSLER, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 
STERLING TAYLOR, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 
MARY ELIZABETH WRIGHT, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 
LAURANCE D. GOODWIN, Fellow in Biochemistry 
JOHN M. KINNEY, Fellow in Biochemistry. 
SAMUEL GORDON, Assistant in Biochemistry. 
EDWARD J. KUCHINSKAS, Assistant in Biochemistry. 

The instruction in biochemistry is concentrated in the first year and 
is arranged upon the assumption that the student is already thoroughly 
grounded in the principles of chemistry and physics. The object is to 
impart that fundamental knowledge of biochemistry which is necessary 
to the comprehension of the bearings of chemistry upon medicine. 

The schedule during the first and second terms is devoted to an inten- 
sive course in general biochemistry by means of lectures, demonstrations, 
and conferences. During the third term the instruction is centered largely 
in the laboratory and the conference room where the knowledge gained 
in the first two terms is consolidated and amplified. Considerable empha- 
sis is laid upon quantitative rather than qualitative laboratory procedures. 
Throughout these lectures the application of biochemistry to the study of 
disease and metabolic disturbances is stressed. Collateral reading in bio- 
chemical literature is encouraged. 

FIRST AND SECOND TERM . . . Lecture and conference course deal- 
ing with the chemistry and intermediary metabolism of proteins, fats, 
carbohydrates, and purines; enzymes, digestion, intestinal putrefaction, 
and feces; the composition of the tissues, blood, milk, and urine; 
hormones and vitamins; the elements of physical chemistry as applied to 
biology and medicine, with emphasis on the fundamental properties of 
electrolytes and colloids. 

33 hours, first term. 

33 hours, second term. 

THIRD TERM . . . Laboratory course with lectures and conferences, 
extending the work of the first two terms. 
154 hours, third term. 

51 



52 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

ADVANCED LABORATORY WORK OR RESEARCH ... By special] 
arrangement. 

COURSES OPEN TO SPECIAL STUDENTS 
BIOCHEMISTRY . . . Fee, $25 a term. 

BIOCHEMICAL LITERATURE . . . Seminar course on the curreni 
literature in biochemistry, mainly for graduate students, but open to 
limited number of specially qualified medical students. Hours to be ar- 
ranged. Professors du Vigneaud, Melville, and Rachele. 

BIOCHEMICAL PREPARATIONS ... A laboratory course dealing 
with the isolation, synthesis, and analysis of selected compounds ol 
biological importance. Hours, credits, and fees to be arranged. The StaflF. 

RESEARCH IN BIOCHEMISTRY ... By arrangement with the hes 
of the department. 



MEDICINE 

DAVID P. BARR, Professor of Medicine. 

LOUIS HAUSMAN, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 

FOSTER KENNEDY, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 

GEORGE M. LEWIS, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatology). 

ASA L. LINCOLN, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

PAUL REZNIKOFF, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

LEO W. SIMMONS, Visiting Professor of Anthropology in Medicine. 

LEWIS D. STEVENSON, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 

HAROLD G. WOLFF, Professor of Medicine (Neurology). 

IRVING S. WRIGHT, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

THOMAS P. ALMY, James Ewing Associate Professor of Neoplastic Diseases 

(Medicine). 
HORACE S. BALDWIN, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
ANTHONY C. CIPOLLARO, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatology). 
LLOYD F. GRAVER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
*JOHN E. DEITRICK, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
HENRY S. DUNNING, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
GARY EGGLESTON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
CLAUDE E. FORKNER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
RICHARD H. FREYBERG, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
EDWIN T. HAUSER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
MARY H. LOVELESS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Allergy). 
WALSH McDERMOTT, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
ADE T. MILHORAT, Associate Professor of Medicine in Psychiatry. 
CARL MUSCHENHEIM, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
THEODORE W. OPPEL, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
HAROLD E. B. PARDEE, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
RULON W. RAWSON, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
HENRY B. RICHARDSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
SIDNEY ROTHBARD, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
EPHRAIM SHORR, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
DONALD J. SIMONS, Associate Professor of Chnical Medicine. 
HAROLD J. STEWART, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
HENRY J. TAGNON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
EDWARD TOLSTOI, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
ROBERT F. WATSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
BRUCE P. WEBSTER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
STEWART G. WOLF, Jr., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

ANDREW J. AKELAITIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 
KEEVE BRODMAN, Assistant Professor of Chnical Medicine. 
JACOB BUCKSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
JOSEPH H. BURCHENAL, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
KATHERINE BUTLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
HENRY A. CARR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
AARON D. CHAVES, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
FRANK E. CORMIA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatology). 
PETER G. DENKER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 
HOWARD A. EDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
AARON FEDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 



* On leave of absence 

53 



54 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 



WILLIAM T. FOLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

CONSTANCE FRIESS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

WILLIAM J. GRACE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

SiDiVE'x' \/( GRRENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

MILTON HELPERN, Assistant Professor ot Ulinlcal Medicine. 

LAWRENCE E. HINKLE, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

DAVID A. KARNOFSKY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

GEORGE L. KAUER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

MARGARET KLUMPP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

MILTON L. KRAMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

JOHN S. LaDUE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

LEON I. LEVINE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

SOL S. LICHTMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

E. HUGH LUCKEY, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

ABRAHAM MAZUR, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine. 

WILLIAM L. MONEY, Assistant Professor of Physiology in Medicine. 

RALPH S. OVERMAN, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine. 

DOUGLASS PALMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

OLOF H. PEARSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

FRANK H. PETERS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

NORMAN PLUMMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

JOSEPH E. RALL, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

GEORGE G. READER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

J. JAMES SMITH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

ISRAEL STEINBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

ARTHUR M. SUTHERLAND, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

ALPHONSE TIMPANELLI, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

RALPH R. TOMPSETT, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

G. DONALD WHEDON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

CHARLES H. WHEELER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

BYARD WILLIAMS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

GEORGE A. WOLF, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

BENJAMIN W. ZWEIFACH, Assistant Professor of Physiology in Medicine. 

SILVIO BAEZ, Research Associate in Medicine. 

BEATRICE BERLE, Research Associate in Medicine. 

ERWIN SHEPPARD, Research Associate in Medicine. 

CLARA TORDA, Research Associate in Medicine. 

ABRAHAM A. ANTOVILLE, Instructor in Medicine. 

SAM C. ATKINSON, Instructor in Medicine. 

RUTH P. BERKELEY, Instructor in Medicine. 

ROBERT M. BIRD, Instructor in Medicine. 

VERONICA BROWN, Instructor in Medicine. 

GRAFTON E. BURKE, Instructor in Medicine. 

EDWARD A. BURKHARDT, Instructor in Medicine. 

THOMAS W. CARR, Instructor in Medicine. 

ANNE C. CARTER, Instructor m Medicine. 

EUGENE J. COHEN, Instructor in Medicine. 

HENRY A. CROMWELL, Instructor in Medicine. 

JEFF DAVIS, Instructor in Medicine. 

MARION DAVIS, Instructor in Medicine. 

HENRY D. DIAMOND, Instructor in Medicine. 

MONROE T. DIAMOND, Instructor in Medicine. 

CHARLES T. DOTTER, Instructor in Medicine. 

JOHN W. DOUGHERTY, Instructor in Medicine. 

ROBERT E. ECKARDT, Instructor in Medicine. 



MEDICINE 

ALBERT J. ERDMANN, Jr., Instructor in Medicine. 
EMIL A. FALK, Instructor in Medicine. 
LAWRENCE FARMER, Instructor in Medicine. 
JOHN M. GIBBONS, Instructor in Medicine. 
OSCAR E. GOLDSTEIN, Instructor in Medicine. 
KEITH O. GUTHRIE, Jr., Instructor in xVIeJicine. 
SUSAN J. HADLEY, Instructor in Medicine. 
LOUIS A. HAUSER, Instructor in Medicine. 
GEORGE W . HEBARD, Instructor in Medicine. 
REID R. HEFFNER, Instructor in Medicine. 
LEONARD L. HEIMOFF, Instructor in Medicine. 
HERMAN G. HELPERN, Instructor in Medicine. 
LAWRENCE B. HOBSON, Instructor in Medicine. 
VINCENT P. HOLLANDER, Instructor in Medicine. 
EVELYN HOLT, Instructor in Medicine. 
LESLIE A. HOMRICH, Instructor in Medicine. 
RAYMOND W. HOUDE, Instructor in Medicine. 
LEIF Y. JACOBSEN, Instructor in Medicine. 
SCOTT JOHNSON, Instructor in Medicine. 
WILLIAM H. KAMMERER, Instructor in Medicine. 
LAWRENCE I. KAPLAN, Instructor in Medicine. 
FRED KERN, Jr., Instructor in Medicine. 
HENRY B. KIRKLAND, Instructor in Medicine. 
J. VERNON KNIGHT, Instructor in Medicine. 
HENRY J. KOCH, Jr., Instructor in Medicine. 
HERBERT KOTEEN, Instructor in Medicine. 
MICHAEL LAKE, Instructor in Medicine. 
FRANCES S. LANSDOWN, Instructor in Medicine. 
ROGER F. LAPHAM, Instructor in Medicine. 
HAROLD L. LEDER, Instructor in Medicine. 
RICHARD E. LEE, Instructor in Medicine. 
DOROTHEA LEMKE, Instructor in Medicine. 
ALLYN B. LEY, Instructor in Medicine. 
ROBERT M. LINTZ, Instructor in Medicine. 
ROBERT O. LOEBEL, Instructor in Medicine. 
DANIEL S. LUKAS, Instructor in Medicine. 
A. PARKS McCOMBS, Instructor in Medicine. 
RICHARD R. McCORMACK, Instructor in Medicine. 
JOHN F. MARCHAND, Instructor in Medicine. 
KIRBY MARTIN, Instructor in Medicine. 
ROBERT H. MELCHIONNA, Instructor in Medicine. 
RAYMOND E. MILLER, Instructor in Medicine. 
L. MARY MOENCH, Instructor in Medicine. 
WILLIS A. MURPHY, Instructor in Medicine. 
RICHARDSON K. NOBACK, Instructor in Medicine. 
MARJORIE B. PATTERSON, Instructor in Medicine. 
MARY ANN PAYNE, Instructor in Medicine. 
CHARLES H. RESSLER, Instructor in Medicine. 
JACOB ROBBINS, Instructor in Medicine. 
DAVID E. ROGERS, Instructor in Medicine. 
JULIUS L. ROGOFF, Instructor in Medicine. 
BRUNO J. ROMEO, Instructor in Medicine. 
JOSEPH F. SABBATINO, Instructor in Medicine. 
THERESA SCANLAN, Instructor in Medicine. 
CHARLES SHEARD, Instructor in Medicine. 



56 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 



EDWARD M. SHEPARD, Instructor in Medicine. 

MARTIN SONENBERG, Instructor in Medicine. 

CHESTER SOUTHAM, Instructor in Medicine. 

AARON D. SPIELMAN, Instructor in Medicine. 

JOHN W. STICKNEY, Instructor in Medicine. 

WILLIAM D. STUBENBORD, Instructor in Medicine. 

JAMES T. SL'TTER, Instructor in Medicine. 

KATHARINE W. SWIFT, Instructor in Medicine. 

DOUGLAS P. TORRE, Instructor in Medicine. 

MAURICE TULIN, Instructor in Medicine. 

J. RUSSELL TWISS, Instructor in Medicine. 

MARIAN TVNDALL, Instructor in Medicine. 

FREDERICK E. G. VALERGAKIS, Instructor in Medicine. 

FREDERICK C. W' EBER, Jr., Instructor in Medicine. 

ERW IN A. WERNER, Instructor in Medicine. 

CHARLES D. WEST, Instructor in Medicine. 

SEYMOUR ZUCKER, Instructor in Medicine. 

CARL A. BERNTSEN, Jr., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

PHILIPPE \'. CARDON, Jr., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

RONALD K. DOIG, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

MARK EISENBUD, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

DUMONT F. ELMENDORF, Jr., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

HELEN GOODELL, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

RICHARD J. HAVEL, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

BASIL S. HETZEL, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

HOWARD H. HIATT, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

MARY E. HOPPER, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

ROBERT D. HUEBNER, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

FREDERIC T. KIRKHAM, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

ROBERT M. McCUNE, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

ELLEN McDEVITT, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

ROBERT F. McGIMSEY, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

WARREN B. NESTLER, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

JOHN O. NESTOR, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

WTLLIAM W. SCHOTTSTAEDT, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

SELMA M. SHULTZ, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

EUGENE P. SIMON, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

CARL A. STEVENSON, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

HERTHA H. TAUSSKY, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

VINCENT A. TOSCANT, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

JOHN A. TULLOCH, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

M. MARTIN TUNIS, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

FRANCIS J. Y. W^OOD, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

SEYMOUR ADVOCATE, Assistant in Medicine. 

THOMAS E. BRITTINGHAM, Assistant in Medicine. 

JOHN F. BURNUM, Assistant in Medicine 

KATHLEEN S. CAWTHON, Assistant in Medicine. 

WTLLIAM U. CAWTHON, Assistant in Medicine. 

HAROLD CONRAD, Jr., Assistant in Medicine. 

MURRAY DWORETZKY, Assistant in Medicine. 

EDMOND C. GAULDEN, Assistant in Medicine. 

JAMES P. GILL, Assistant in Medicine. 

ELSIE A. GIORGI, Assistant in Medicine. 

WARREN R. GUILD, Assistant in Medicine. 

ERNEST G. KANE, Assistant in Medicine. 



MEDICINE 57 

GALE H. KEYES, Assistant in Medicine. 
JERROLD S. LIEBERMAN, Assistant in Medicine. 
FLETCHER McDOWELL, Assistant in Medicine. 
MORTON H. MAXWELL, Assistant in Medicine. 
DAVID W. MOLANDER, Assistant in Medicine. 
FRANCIS S. PERRONE, Assistant in Medicine. 
R. A. REES PRITCHETT, Assistant in Medicine. 
PETER RICHTER, Assistant in Medicine. 
WILLIAM C. ROBBINS, Assistant in Medicine. 
ALAN S. ROBINSON, Assistant in Medicine. 
ALBERT L. RUBIN, Assistant in Medicine. 
LAWRENCE S. SONKIN, Assistant in Medicine. 
LAWRENCE SWEENEY, Assistant in Medicine. 
JOHN M. WALLACE, Assistant in Medicine. 
CLINTON G. WEIMAN, Assistant in Medicine. 
GEORGE W. W^ELSH, III, Assistant in Medicine. 
EUGENE I. ZINS, Assistant in Medicine. 

WILLIAM G. C. MUNROE, Lecturer in Medicine (Tuberculosis). 
IGNAZ W. OLJENICK, Lecturer in Medicine (Neurology). 
ROBERT L. YEAGER, Lecturer in Medicine (Tuberculosis). 

Students begin their course in medicine in the second term of the 
second year with physical diagnosis under Dr. Stewart. They are intro- 
duced to this subject in the second term (two afternoons a week) by 
means of lectures, demonstrations, and practical work on normal sub- 
jects and patients. In the third term they spend two mornings a week 
with the patients either in the pavilions of New York Hospital or on the 
wards of Bellevue, Memorial Hospital, or Lincoln Hospital. 

An introductory course in neurologic diagnostic methods is given under 
the direction of Dr. Wolff in the third term of the second year. The 
work consists of demonstrations and intensive training in the discipline 
of neurological examination. The students in groups of three are assigned 
to an instructor on the neurology service at Bellevue Hospital. This 
work coincides in time with the other training in physical diagnosis. 

An introductory required course in clinical pathology is given in the 
third term of the second year, under the direction of Dr. Kellner. It 
consists of lectures and laboratory work. Among the topics discussed 
are the theory, practice, and application of methods for the examination 
of urine, blood, sputum, exudates, transudates, spinal fluid, gastric con- 
tents, and feces. The methods studied include chemical, morphological, 
serological, and animal inoculation methods which are of value as diag- 
nostic procedures. Discussion of the clinical signification of findings is 
included. In addition, certain allergic phenomena are presented in lec- 
ture and demonstration and their clinical relationship discussed. 

In each of the terms of the third year, one third of the class act as 
clinical clerks in medicine in the pavilions of the New York Hospital. 
The medical wards of the New York Hospital under the supervision of 
Dr. Barr comprise five public pavilions totaling 142 beds. The service 
includes patients with diseases of the nervous system and of the skin. 



58 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 



These are under the care of subdepartments which are organized for 
teaching and cHnical research as well as the management of patients. 
They are, therefore, analogous to independent departments of derma- 
tology and neurology as seen in other hospitals. An active pulmonary 
service is functioning in close cooperation with the surgical service and 
pediatric service. Beds on the fourth floor are used for the study and 
treatment of infectious diseases, including tuberculosis, the exanthemata, 
and syphilis. The syphilis service (Medicine L) is organized for the study 
of all phases of the disease as well as for its epidemiological control. There 
is close cooperation with the department of psychiatry in the study of the 
neuroses and early manifestations of psychoses found in the wards and 
dispensary. 

The third year clinical clerkship at the New York Hospital is under 
the direction of Drs. Barr, Wolfif, and Grace. The backbone of the 
student's training as a clinical clerk is believed to be his own experience 
with patients as amplified by reading and by contact with members of 
the hospital and teaching staflf. He is given as much responsibility as 
is practical, namely, the recording, in the hospital records, of his own 
histories and laboratory examinations. These, together with his physical 
examinations, are supervised by tutors, each of whom has responsibility 
for the supervision of a small group of students. Additional teaching 
consists of rounds with the visiting and house staflf and more formal 
conferences once a week in which the clerks present cases for criticism 
and discussion. In these it is attempted to cover the more important 
fields of internal medicine. The work of the clerkships is supplemented 
by frequent clinical conferences which are held throughout the academic 
year. During the third clinical clerkship the students receive further 
training in the evaluation of signs and symptoms of disease of the ner- 
vous system. Twice a week the clinical clerks discuss the personality 
and psychiatric problems of their patients with a member of the depart- 
ment of psychiatry. Two teaching visits a week at the New York Hos- 
pital are dedicated to neurological problems. This work supplements 
that of the second year by placing special emphasis upon etiology and 
therapeusis in diseases of the nervous system. 

The senior students are divided into five groups, each of which de- 
votes one term of the college year to general medicine and the medical 
specialties. Under the supervision of Dr. George Reader and other micm- 
bers of the medical staflf, thev spend two months in the out-patient de- 
partment of the New York Hospital, where they are assigned in small 
groups to sections in general medicine and clinics devoted to deiTnatology 
and some of the other medical specialties. Other special departments of 
the clinic such as physiotherapy and dietotherapy provide demonstrations 
to the fourth year clerks. The practical work with the patients is sup- 
plemented by seminars, clinics, lectures, demonstrations, and weekly pre- 
sentations of subjects by the students themselves. 



MEDICINE S9 

During the fourth year chnical clerkship in medicine, students for a 
period of 18 hours are brought by Dr. Wolff and his stafT in contact with 
ambulatory patients suffering from diseases of the nervous system. Fur- 
ther opportunity to gain proficiency in the diagnosis of diseases of the 
nervous system is aflforded. Special emphasis is placed upon the home 
management of patients with neurologic defects. 

Clinical-pathological conferences organized by the department of 
pathology in conjunction with the clinical departments occur weekly 
throughout the year. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

CLINICAL CLERKSHIP AT BELLEVUE HOSPITAL ... Dr. E. 

Hugh Luckey and Staff. For periods of one month. Maximum registra- 
tion, eight students. Work will include case assignments, ward rounds, 
frequent conferences with Dr. Luckey and members of his staff. 

ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM ... Dr. Ephriam Shorr 
and Staff. For periods of two months. Maximum registration, two stu- 
dents. The work will consist of assignments to diabetic clinic, endocrine 
clinic, metabolism ward, and participation in applicable laboratory 
methods. 

INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND CHEMOTHERAPY ... Dr. Walsh 
McDermott and Dr. Ralph Tompsett. For periods of one or two months. 
Maximum registration, two students. Work will include assignments to 
infectious disease ward for the study of tuberculosis, participation in 
clinical and research projects under way in this sub-department. 

NEUROLOGY ... Dr. Harold G. Wolff and Staff. For periods of one 
month or two months. Maximum registration, three students. For the 
shorter period, the work will include participation in clinical activities, 
on the neurological out-patient department and ward. For the longer 
period, it will include also participation in investigative problems. 

CARDIOLOGY ... Dr. Harold J. Stewart and Staff. For period of two 
months. Maximum registration, one student. The work will consist of 
participation in the cardiac clinic and wards, and the reading of electro- 
cardiograms, and assignments to research problems. 

HEMATOLOGY ... Dr. Paul Reznikoff and Staff. For periods of one 
month or two months. Maximum registration, two students. The work 
will include participation in clinical activities in the out-patient depart- 
ment, ward, and hematology laboratory, together with possible assign- 
ment to investigative problems. 



60 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

NEURO'ANATOMY . . . This course, given by Dr. Louis Hausman, 
will cover the development and anatomy of the nervous system and 
laboratory work on the reconstruction of the nervous system. Each stu- 
dent makes his own model. The anatomical background of the diseases 
of the nervous system is considered. Hours to be arranged with the 
instructor. 

FORENSIC MEDICINE . . . 

(a) A series of 30 lectures given by Dr. Milton Helpern. The subject 
matter is illustrated with material derived from cases investigated by 
the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the Borough of Manhattan. 

This course covers the following topics: the obligations and rights of 
physicians; relations of the physician to governmental agencies; functions 
of the office of medical examiner and of coroner; investigation and de- 
termination of the cause of sudden, suspicious, and violent deaths; the 
medicolegal necropsy; identification, signs of death, changes in the body 
after death; sudden natural death; relationship of disease and trauma; 
suicidal, accidental, and homicidal violent deaths; blunt force injuries, 
stab and bullet wounds, traumatic asphyxia, rape, abortion, infanticide; 
toxicology, especially the indications of poisoning and the selection of 
organs for chemical analysis; examination of blood stains, seminal stains, 
and hair, forensic applications of blood grouping; occupational injuries 
and diseases. 

Monday afternoon, 5-6 p.m. 

(b) Practical course. An opportunity will be afforded to learn the 
circumstances surrounding and to observe at first hand the autopsy find- 
ings in numerous and varied cases of sudden, unexpected, suspicious, 
and violent deaths which are continuously being brought to the attention 
of the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the Borough of Man- 
hattan for investigation. 

Course to be given at the City Mortuary, 400 East 29th Street. 
Applicants should arrange their time with Dr. Helpern. 
Other special electives may be arranged through conference with the 
head of the department. 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 

R. GORDON DOUGLAS, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

BYRON H. GOFF, Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

ROY W. BONSNES, Associate Professor of Biochemistry in Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

EDWARD H. DENNEN, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

CARL T. JAVERT, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

HOWARD S. McCANDLLSH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

CHARLES M. McLANE, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

JOSEPH N. NATHANSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

FRANK R. SMITH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WILLIAM H. GARY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

JOHN T. COLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

OGDEN F. CONKEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

ROBERT L. CRAIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WILLIAM F. FINN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

RALPH W. CAUSE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

J. RANDOLPH GEPFERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

OSCAR CLASSMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

ARTFIUR V. GREELEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

W. HALL HAWKINS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

DONALD G. JOHNSON, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

CURTIS L. MENDELSON, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

JOHN B. PASTORE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

MEYER ROSENSOHN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

NELSON B. SACKETT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology, 

THOMAS L. BALL, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

ROBERT C. EMMEL, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WILLIAM P. GIVEN, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

ELMER E. KRAMER, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

ROBERT LANDESMAN, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

VIRGINIA K. PIERCE, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

CHARLES T. SNYDER, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

J. GEORGE TIFFT, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

MYRON I. BUCHMAN, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WILLIAM H. BURKE, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

DAVID B. CRAWTORD, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

CHRISTIAN DeWINTER, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

HUGH HALSEY, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WILLIAM D. McLARN, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

JAMES A. MERRILL, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

KENNETH G. NICKERSON, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

ERWIN FLETCHER SMITH, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WILLIAM J. SWEENEY, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

E. HENRY VALENTINE, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

JEROME A. WEINBAUM, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

PAUL L. WHITE, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

ROY H. DICKERSON, Research Fellow in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

61 



62 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 



The Lying-in Hospital, a division of the New York Hospital, provides 
130 pavilion beds for teaching purposes in obstetrics and gynecology. 
In addition, the private service consists of a total of 74 beds. Students 
are given practical instruction in the out-patient department clinics of 
both obstetrics and gynecology and in the various special clinics operated 
for the more intensive study and care of patients with unusual problems. 
The students are given every opportunity to benefit from the clinical 
work as carried on and demonstrated on the wards and in the operating 
and delivery rooms. 

There are approximately 5,000 admissions to the obstetrical service 
and about 2,000 to the gynecological service each year. 

THIRD YEAR 

COURSE I. THE THEORY AND PRINCIPLES OF OBSTETRICS 
AND GYNECOLOGY . . . The content of this course consists of lectures 
and demonstrations covering the anatomy and physiology of the female 
reproductive system; the physiology and pathology of pregnancy, labor, 
and puerperium; and the etiology, pathology, and diagnosis of the 
diseases of the pelvic structures. 

The entire class meets for these sessions on Tuesdays and Saturdays 
12-1 p.m. throughout the year. Professors Douglas, Javert, Finn, John- 
son, McLane, and StafT. Total hours, 66. 

COURSE II. PRACTICAL INSTRUCTION . . . This work is given to 
one sixth of the class for periods of one half of a trimester (5!/2 weeks) 
on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 to 11 a.m. The course deals especially 
with abdominal palpation, pelvic examination, and manikin exercises. 
Professors Douglas, Dennen, Johnson, and Staff. 



COURSE III. SEMINAR 

Professor Douglas and Staff. 



Tuesdays and Thursdays 11-12 a.m. 



COURSE IV. PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATION . . . This course com- 
prises instruction in obstetrical and gynecological bacteriology and 
pathology. Mondays 9-12 a.m. for one trimester. Professors Douglas, 
Javert, Finn, and Staff. Total hours, 66 for Courses II, III, and IV. 



FOURTH YEAR 

MAJOR PRACTICAL OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY . . . This 
course comprises practical work in obstetrics and gynecology and is the 
sequel to the theoretical instruction offered to the third year students. 
Each student will live in the Lying-in Hospital for a period of two 
months, during which time he will act as a clinical assistant in the 
obstetrical and gynecological departments, hospital wards, delivery and 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 63 

operating rooms, and clinics. He will be provided with sleeping accom- 
modations but not with board. 

The practical work includes the prenatal care of many patients, at- 
tending them in labor and delivery as well as following them throughout 
the course of the puerperium. Facilities are also provided for the stu- 
dent to examine gynecological patients and to follow these patients 
through diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. 

Because of the nature of the service, night work is required. Minimum 
hours allotted to the course, 264. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

PRACTICAL OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY ... A certain 
number of students will be accepted to serve as assistants in the clinic. 

Courses can be arranged in the chemical, bacteriological, and patho- 
logical laboratories for the study of specific research problems. The 
special clinics provide teaching facilities for clinical investigation in 
carcinoma, endocrinology, heart disease, X-ray pelvimetry, infertility, 
and other allied sciences. The various rounds and staff conferences can 
be attended. 

Encouragement is given original work according to the departmental 
facilities and the student's capabilities and in general will be designed to 
meet the student's qualifications. 



PATHOLOGY 

JOHN G. KIDD, Professor of Pathology. 
JOHN M. PEARCE, Professor of Pathology. 
CORNELIUS P. RHOADS, Professor of Pathology. 
FRED W. STEWART, Professor of Pathology. 
FRANK W. FOOTE, Jr., Associate Professor of Pathology. 
LEWIS D. STEVENSON, Associate Professor of Pathology. 
ARTHUR C. ALLEN, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
JOHN T. ELLIS, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
BERNARD KALFAYAN, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
AARON KELLNER, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
CHARLES T. OLCOTT, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
F. STEPHEN VOGEL, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
GOETZ W. RICHTER, Research Associate in Pathology. 
JAMES B. HUTCHESON, III, Instructor in Pathology. 
WILLIAM B. BISSELL, Assistant in Pathology. 
ALEX N. HELPER, Assistant in Pathology. 
CLAUDE I. HOOD, Assistant in Pathology. 
GEORGE P. SCHEINESSON, Assistant in Pathology. 
CAREY STANTON, Assistant in Pathology. 
DAVID STUBINGTON, Assistant in Pathology. 
HARCHARAN D. TANDON, Assistant in Pathology. 

PAUL F. De GARA, Lecturer in Pathology. 
JULES FREUND, Lecturer in Pathology. 
MILTON HELPERN, Lecturer in Pathology. 
THEODORE ROBERTSON, Lecturer in Pathology. 

GENERAL PATHOLOGY 

FACILITIES . . . The department of pathology occupies three floors 
of the central part of the College building, conveniently located above 
the library and in immediate contact with the Hospital, the autopsy 
room being in the connecting wing between College and Hospital. The 
teaching is largely concentrated on the third floor, where the autopsy 
room, demonstration room for pathological anatomy, anatomical mu- 
seum, and classrooms are found. The fourth and fifth floors are chiefly 
unit laboratories for staff members and graduate students and for tech- 
nical preparation. In addition, animal quarters and facilities for experi- 
mental work are on the fifth, sixth, and seventh floors. 

The museum contains a carefully selected collection of specimens,, 
representing most of the common and many of the more unusual patho- 
logical lesions. It is especially rich in lesions of bones and in tumors. 
In addition to this mounted collection, there is available a very consider- 
able amount of constantly changing gross material for student study. 

The postmortem service of the New York Hospital affords abundant 
opportunity for study of pathological anatomy and its relation to clinical 

64 



PATHOLOGY 65 

medicine. The systematic records of autopsies performed at the New 
York Hospital have been preserved since 1851, and in recent years pro- 
tocols and microscopic slides have been carefully indexed and filed. 

INSTRUCTIOX . . . The course of instruction is given in the second 
and third terms of the second year. Gross and histological lesions are 
studied and their pathogenesis and correlation with disturbed function 
is considered. Lectures and classroom demonstrations are supplemented 
by studies at the autopsy table. The course begins with the degenera- 
tions, inflammation, and repair, and proceeds with the various specific 
infections and tumors. The latter part of the course is devoted to special 
systematic pathology including an introduction to neuropatholog\'. 

GENERAL AND SPECIAL PATHOLOGY . . . Required in the second 
and third terms of the second year. 

Professors Kidd. Pearce, Olcott, and Staff. 275 hours. 

NEUROPATHOLOGY . . . The pathology of the nervous system is 
studied and altered structure and function correlated. Professor Steven- 
son. 33 hours. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGICAL CONFERENCES . . . These confer- 
ences are held in cooperation with the staffs of the clinical departments 
of the Hospital and Medical College each week throughout the year. 
Observations concerning the clinical course and diagnosis of diseases are 
correlated with changes found at autopsy. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

A student may undertake the investigation of some problem in 
pathology or may pursue advanced courses in any of several fields, to 
be determined by consultation with the head of the department. Research 
or elective courses will ordinarily require the entire time of the student 
tor a period of one to three months, and may be continued into the 
summer. 



PEDIATRICS 

SAMUEL Z. LEVINE, Professor of Pediatrics. 

ARTHUR F. ANDERSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HENRY L. BARNETT, Associate Professor of Pediatrics. 

HAROLD W. K. DARGEON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HENRY D. LAUSON, Associate Professor of Physiology in Pediatrics. 

CARL H. SMITH, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

PHILIP M. STIMSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MAY G. WILSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HAROLD B. ADAMS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

LEONA BAUMGARTNER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

SAMUEL R. BERENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

CLEMENT B. P. COBB, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MARGARET DANN, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

PAUL F. DE GARA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics in Allergy. 

ROBERT O. Dubois, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HELENE ELIASBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

LEWIS M. FRAAD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

JOHN E. FRANKLIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MARTIN J. GLYNN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HENRY P. GOLDBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

JAMES Q. HARALAMBIE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HELEN HARRINGTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

FREDERICK C. HUNT, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

EDMUND N. JOYNER, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HEDWIG KOENIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MILTON I. LEVINE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MARY E. MERCER, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in Psychiatry. 

CHARLES H. O'REGAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

LOUTS E. WEYMULLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MARJORIE A. WHEATLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

OTTO E. BILLO, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

WALTER T. CARPENTER, Jr., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

NATHAN EPSTEIN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

BARBARA M. KORSCH, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

PHYLLIS H. KOTEEN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

WILLIAM E. LAUPUS, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

ROBERT G. McGOVERN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MARION McILVEEN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

ROWLAND L. MINDLIN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

LOIS M. SMEDLEY, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MARTHA L. SMITH, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MAXWELL STILLERMAN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

STANLEY S. ZIPSER, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

HELEN N. HELPER, Fellow in Pediatrics. 

GUILHERME MATTAR, Fellow in Pediatrics. 

JOAN E. MORGENTHAU, Fellow in Pediatrics. 

IRVING SCHULMAN, Fellow in Pediatrics. 

JOAN K. BARBER, Assistant in Pediatrics. 

JEAN T. BEASLEY, Assistant in Pediatrics. 

MERTON E. COHEN, Assistant in Pediatrics. 

66 



PEDIATRICS 67 

MURRAY DAVIDSON, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
JAMES A. DOUCETT, Jr., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
HEINZ F. EICHENWALD, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
DAVID T. KARZON, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
FLORENCE N. MARSHALL, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
HELEN McNAMARA, Research Assistant in Pediatrics. 
ELIZABETH V. NEW, Research Assistant in Pediatrics. 

THIRD YEAR ... A clinical lecture once a week throughout the entire 
school year presents the subjects of normal growth and development 
in infants and children, principles of nutrition with their application 
to infant feeding, and patients illustrating the peculiarities of disease in 
early life. Students serve as clinical clerks in pediatrics for a period of 
five and one-half weeks on the pavilions of the New York Hospital. They 
are assigned new cases in rotation and gain experience in the manage- 
ment of sick children requiring hospital residence. They are on duty in 
rotation at night and weekends. The work of the clinical clerkship in- 
cludes attendance at well-baby and phophylactic clinics, rounds, and 
seminars. Instruction in contagious diseases is given at the Willard 
Parker Hospital. Total hours, 165. 

FOURTH YEAR . . . The clinical lectures are continued through part 
of the fourth year. Students are assigned to the out-patient department 
in the mornings where they are given, under supervision, responsibility 
for the management of ambulatory pediatric patients. They take histo- 
ries, make physical examinations, and prescribe treatment. A daily 
therapeutic conference supplements the clinical work. A series of seminars 
for case presentation will be held under the supervision of senior stafT 
members. An effort is made to bring back to the out-patient department 
certain patients seen by the students in their third year for follow-up 
during their fourth year term in pediatrics. Emphasis is placed on the 
handling of psychosomatic problems and on the measures which can be 
taken to promote proper growth and development. Total hours, 51. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Elective courses are open to fourth year students. These include the 
general pediatric clinic, emergency unit, some special pediatric clinics, 
afternoon seminars, nursery school experience, and research. Substitute 
internships are offered at times during the year. 



PHARMACOLOGY 

McKEEN CATTELL, Professor of Pharmacology. 

HARRY GOLD, Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. 

OSCAR BODANSKY, Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. 

WALTER F. RIKER, Jr., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 

JANET TRAVELL, Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. 

CHARLES J. KENSLER, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. 

WALTER MODELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. 

FREDERICK S. PHILIPS, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. 

DONALD A. CLARKE, Instructor in Pharmacology. 

FRANK C. FERGUSON, Jr., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

SOLOMON GARB, Instructor in Pharmacology. 

THEODORE H. GREINER, Instructor in Pharmacology. 

NATHANIEL T. KWIT, Instructor in Pharmacology. 

GEORGE G. READER, Instructor in Pharmacology (Therapeutics). 

JOSEPH F. REILLY, Instructor in Pharmacology. 

EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY . . . Laboratory work, demon- 
strations, conferences, and lectures given during the first term of the 
second year. The experiments are designed to illustrate a wide range 
of pharmacologic effects, the more important drugs being considered 
with reference to their action on different structures and their behavior 
in the organism. In conference, the laboratory data obtained by the 
class are assembled and discussed in relation to each other and to ex- 
periments reported in the literature. This course also includes elementary 
pharmacy and toxicology, with a consideration of crude drugs, practice 
in the making of pharmacopoeial preparations, and toxicological analysis. 
99 hours, 

APPLIED PHARMACOLOGY . . . This course is given during the 
third trimester of the second year and is a continuation of the course in 
experimental pharmacology. It is intended to fill a gap between experi- 
mental pharmacology and the clinical use of drugs, and it deals with 
substances the pharmacological action of which can best be demon- 
strated on clinical material. This course includes practice in prescription 
writing. Emphasis is placed on evidence bearing directly on the human 
subject in health and diseases. 22 hours. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

CONFERENCES ON THERAPY . . . Weekly informal conferences on 
treatment arranged by the departments of pharmacology and medicine 
in collaboration with other departments. These serve as a forum for 
the exchange of views and evaluation of evidence concerning drugs and 
other measures used in the treatment of disease, with open discussion 
by students, members of the College and Hospital staff, and visitors. 

68 



PHARMACOLOGY 69 

RESEARCH . . . Arrangements are made for individuals or groups to 
participate in original investigations with a view to learning the methods 
of pharmacological research. Special opportunities are afforded for work 
on enzyme systems, muscle-nerve, autonomic nervous system, and the 
cardiovascular system. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOPHYSICS 

ROBERT F. PITTS, Professor of Physiology. 
JAMES D. HARDY, Associate Professor of Physiology. 
HENRY D. LAUSON, Associate Professor of Physiology. 
RICHARD W. LAWTON, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 
JOHN MacLeod, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 
DAVID R. AXELROD, Research Associate in Physiology. 
DAVID D. THOMPSON, Instructor in Physiology. 
KATHLEEN E. ROBERTS, Fellow in Physiology. 
MARTHA J. BARRETT, Assistant in Physiology. 
ALICE M. STOLE, Assistant in Physiology. 
ROBERT A. WOLBACH, Assistant in Physiology. 



FIRST YEAR . . . Lectures, conferences, laboratory experiments, and 
demonstrations. Physiology of muscle and nerve, gland secretion, diges- 
tion, the central nervous system, special senses, and endocrine organs. 
The laboratory work one full day a week includes experiments on these 
subjects. 110 hours. 

SECOND YEAR . . . Lectures, conferences, laboratory experiments, and 
demonstrations. Physiology of respiration, blood, heart, circulation, 
kidney, and metabolism. Laboratory exercises one full day a week. 121 
hours. 

The course of instruction in physiology is directed toward an under- 
standing of the principles involved in the functioning of the human 
body and the integration of its various systems. The lectures are sup- 
plemented by references to the current literature. The department is 
fortunate in having housed on the fourth floor of its building the Graham 
Lusk Library of Physiology, a gift to the department from its late Pro- 
fessor Graham Lusk. This includes bound volumes of complete sets of 
the important physiological and biochemical literature, monographs, 
handbooks, and textbooks, and is being supplemented by some of the 
current journals and monographs. In addition to the college library, 
the facilities of this library are at the disposal of the students of medicine. 

The laboratory work includes a number of human experiments, 
emphasizes mammalian physiology, and is directed toward quantitative 
determinations. The laboratory experiments are chosen to illustrate 
fundamental principles in the respective fields of physiology and are 
correlated with lectures by means of conferences. The demonstrations 
include instruction in specialized techniques, experimental preparations, 
and presentation of clinical cases. These are facilitated by the participa- 
tion and cooperation of staff members of various departments in the 
Medical College and the New York Hospital. 

70 



■^ 



PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOPHYSICS 71 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

The department will arrange a schedule of work for fourth year 
students who wish to devote their elective time to physiology. 

COURSES OPEN TO SPECIAL STUDENTS 

1. PHYSIOLOGY. Fee, $100 for each term. 

2. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESEARCH. Subject to special arrangement 
with head of the department. 



PSYCHIATRY 

OSKAR DIETHELM, Professor of Psychiatry. 
PHYLLIS GREENACRE, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
THOMAS A. C. RENNIE, Professor of Psychiatry (Social Psychiatry). 
CARL A. BINGER, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
J. LOUISE DESPERT, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
WILLIAM H. DUNN, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
GEORGE W. HENRY, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
ADE T. MILHORAT, Associate Professor of Medicine in Psychiatry. 
JAMES H. WALL, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
HAROLD G. WOLFF, Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 
FRANCIS J. HAMILTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
RICHARD L. HARRIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
-GERALD R. JAMEISON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
SEYMOUR G. KLEBANOFF, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 
RICHARD N. KOHL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
NORVELLE C. LaMAR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
ALEXANDER H. LEIGHTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
MARY E. MERCER, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in Psychiatry. 
CURTIS T. PROUT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
FRED V. ROCKWELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
JOHN H. TRAVIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
JAMES S. TYHURST, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
LIVINGSTON WELCH, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 
EXIE E. WELSCH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 
MILTON FARBER, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 
ANNE MILMAN, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 
EMIL OBERHOLZER, Research Associate in Psychiatry. 
EDWARD B. ALLEN, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
VALER BARBU, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
EDWARD R. BENNETT, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
SARA A. BONNETT, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
A. LOUISE BRUSH, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
JOHN M. COTTON, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
ELEANOR CRISSEY, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
HELEN DANIELLS, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
M. FREILE FLEETWOOD, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
ALAN W. ERASER. Instructor in Psychiatry. 
MARTIN J. GERSON, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
STEPHEN GOODYEAR, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
FRANCIS D. KANE, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
CHARLES A. KNEHR, Instructor in Psychology 
HELEN P. LANGNER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
ALBERT N. MAYERS, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
LEON L. RACKOW, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
ARNOLD A. SCHILLINGER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
MARY J. SHERFEY, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
ALBERT C. SHERWIN, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
DONALD J. SIMONS, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
LEONARD R. STRAUB, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
JOSEPH D. SULLIVAN, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

72 



PSYCHIATRY 73 

HANS SYZ, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
WILLIAM D. VOORHEES, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
MORTON WADSWORTH, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
NATHANIEL WARxNER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
LOUIS J. WEST, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
WALTER D. WOODWARD, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
HAROLD S. WRIGHT, Instructor in Psychiatry. 
HOWARD N. COOPER, Assistant in Psychiatry. 
DONALD C. GREAVES, Assistant in Psychiatry. 
WALTER W. KEMP, Assistant in Psychiatry. 
JOHN F. McGRATH, Assistant in Psychiatry. 
CHARLES P. NEUMANN, Assistant in Psychiatry. 
D. L. N. MURTI RAO, Assistant in Psychiatry. 
LIBUSE J. TYHURST, Assistant in Psychiatry. 
FREDERICK J. W'ERTZ, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

The department of psychiatry ofTers instruction during each of the 
four years. The understanding of growth and development of the 
normal personality forms a necessary basis for future clinical training. 
A course in psychopathology in the second year orients the student in 
personality disorders and in the methods of their examination and study. 
In the third year, this preliminary training is utilized in the study of 
patients at the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic and on the pavilions 
■of the New York Hospital. In the psychiatric out-patient department, 
■during the fourth year, he participates in the study and treatment of 
the diverse problems presenting themselves in general psychiatric prac- 
tice. The importance of personality problems in general medicine is 
taught in the pavilions of the New York Hospital and in the out-patient 
service of the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic. Clinics are planned 
to unify these many activities and to offer in addition a broad under- 
standing of treatment and investigation. 

FIRST YEAR: PERSONALITY GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 

. . . This course acquaints the student with the growth and development 
and methods of study of the normal personality. Lectures, seminars, 
and selected films are utilized in presenting a dynamic orientation to 
the formation of the adult personality from infancy through senescence. 
The significance of interpersonal relations is stressed, with particular 
emphasis on the patient-physician relationship. Psychological, physio- 
logical, and sociological factors are considered. Total hours, 22. 

SECOND YEAR: PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND METHODS OF 
EXAMINATION . . . The outstanding psychopathological phenomena 
are demonstrated and their psychodynamics studied by the students on 
patients in the out-patient department of the Payne Whitney Psychiatric 
Clinic and at the Manhattan State Hospital. This course offers practical 
■experience in interviewing and history-taking and in the methods of 
psychiatric examination. Total hours, 33. 



74 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

THIRD YEAR: CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY ... In the in-patient de- 
partment of the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic various psychiatric 
illnesses are presented; in the medical and surgical pavilions of the New 
York Hospital, patients are studied in whom psychological and psycho- 
pathological factors are important. Total hours, 33. 

FOURTH YEAR: CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY ... In this course in the 
out-patient department of the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, the 
student carries out the treatment of individual patients. This course 
offers an opportunity to learn psychotherapy under close supervision 
and to imderstand the role of psychiatric social service and of psycho- 
logical studies in the adjustment of these patients. Clinics with case 
presentation, with emphasis on psychiatric treatment and review of 
literature, are given on Monday from 12 to 1 o'clock. A series of lectures 
deals with the psychopathology of childhood and the management of 
related difficulties. Total hours, 81. 

ELECTIVE WORK 

Opportunities for elective work are provided in the out-patient de- 
partment and in the laboratoriees of the Payne Whitney Psychiatric 
Clinic, and at the Westchester Division of the New York Hospital, 
White Plains, N. Y. 



PUBLIC HEALTH AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

WILSON G. SMILLIE, Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

EMERSON DAY, Associate Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

*MORTON C. KAHN, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

LEONA BAUMGARTNER, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

SAMUEL R. BERENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and 
Preventive Medicine. 

BEATRICE B. BERLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

AARON D. CHAVES, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

HERBERT R. EDWARDS, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

FRANKLIN M. FOOTE, Assistant Professor of PubHc Health and Preventive Medi- 
cine. 

ANN P. KENT, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

PHILIP OLLSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

WILLIS M. WEEDEN, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medi- 
cine. 

NINE CHOUCROUN, Research Associate in Public Health and Preventive Medi- 
cine. 

BERNARD D. DAVIS, Research Associate in Public Health and Preventive Medi- 
cine. 

HUGH R. DeHAVEN, Research Associate in Public Health and Preventive Medi- 
cine. 

FRED KERN, Jr., Instructor in Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

THOMAS G. RIGNEY, Instructor in PubHc Health and Preventive Medicine. 

WALTER D. WOODWARD, Instructor in Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

DANIEL A. ALVAREZ, Assistant in Parasitology. 

SECOND YEAR: PARASITOLOGY . . . This course is assigned to the 
department of public health and preventive medicine because the major 
interests of several members of the staflf lie in the field of tropical medi- 
cine. Furthermore, the preventive aspects of diseases that are produced 
by parasites are of paramount importance in the control of these infec- 
tions. 

The course is given each Thursday afternoon during the first trimester 
of the second year. The lectures are given from 2 to 3 and the laboratory 
work from 3 to 5 p.m. 

The important parasites of man are considered: the mode of trans- 
mission of each parasite is studied, as well as the life cycle and inter- 
mediate hosts. Particular emphasis is placed on the clinical aspects of 
the various diseases that may be produced by the parasites. Prevention 
and control of human parasitic diseases are given proper consideration, 
and the therapy of these conditions is discussed carefully. 

* On leave of absence. 

75 



76 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

An abundance of material is used for demonstration purposes. Many 
of the parasites are studied in living stages. Clinical cases of the various 
diseases under study are presented from the hospital wards, out-patient 
clinics, and elsewhere, whenever suitable material is available. Total 
hours, 33. 

SECOND YEAR: PUBLIC HEALTH ... The course in public health 
begins in the second term of the second year. It is an introductory course 
in environmental sanitation, industrial hygiene, vital statistics, and the 
principles of public health. The students are assigned to this work every 
Monday afternoon for approximately 1 1 exercises. Laboratory assign- 
ments and field exercises make up the major part of the work. The 
essential material covered in this term relates to community health pro- 
tection, including the control of water supplies, sewage disposal, and 
the sanitation of food. Housing is studied in relation to its various social 
and hygienic aspects, as well as air-borne infection and the problems of 
industrial hygiene. Four afternoons are devoted to vital statistics, in- 
cluding a consideration of the methods of statistical analysis and inter- 
pretation: three afternoons are devoted to health promotion of the in- 
dustrial worker. Field visits are made, usually in small groups, to 
demonstrate industrial sanitation, housing, the New York City Health 
Department's diagnostic laboratory service, and other pertinent matters. 
Total hours, 33. 

THIRD YEAR: PREVENTIVE MEDICINE . . . Students are divided 
into small groups of about twelve each. These student are assigned to the 
department of preventive medicine every Friday all day for a five to six 
week period. The sections are subdivided into groups of about four stu- 
dents. These groups are then assigned to section work in the various 
activities of the Kips Bay-Yorkville Health Center, In addition, the stu- 
dents are given a full day's session with the Department of Workmen's 
Compensation and one half-day session at the Strang Cancer Prevention 
Clinic at Memorial Hospital. Each Friday at noon throughout the year 
the whole class assembles for a lecture or discussion. The subject matter 
of these exercises has, for the most part, been prepared by and is pre- 
sented by the students themselves. Total lectures and discussions, 33 
hours; total section work, 33 hours. 

COMMUNITY STUDY . . . Each student is requested to prepare a re- 
port of a community of his own choice, giving in detail the facilities 
provided by the community for care of illness and protection of com- 
munity health. This report includes not only the activities of the com- 
munity health and welfare departments, but also the hospital facilities, 
medical, nursing, and dental personnel, and all other phases of com- 
munity activities that aid in providing a comprehensive system of ade- 
quate medical care. 



PUBLIC HEALTH AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 77 

FAMILY HEALTH ADVISERS . . . Approximately one third of the 
class select an assignment which is in lieu of the community study. These 
students are called "Family Health Advisers". Each of these students is 
assigned to a family from the clientele of The New York Hospital and, 
under careful guidance, he becomes a confidential adviser to the family 
on health matters during a period of two years. 

FOURTH YEAR: CLINICAL EXERCISES IN PREVENTIVE 
MEDICINE . . . Each Wednesday afternoon the fourth year class meets 
for one hour, 3 to 4 p.m., throughout the year. This hour is divided be- 
tween Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Pediatrics with some overlap- 
ping presentations. The conferences in Preventive Medicine consist of 
clinical exercises which demonstrate the means by which physicians can 
incorporate the principles of preventive medicine in clinical practice. 
Total hours, 11. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE ... An elective course is offered to students 
in the fourth year. Not more than four students will be accepted for 
any one period. Students will be assigned to the Kips Bay-Yorkville 
District Health Center and will participate in the various clinical and 
research activities of the Center. 

MEDICAL PARASITOLOGY . . . This course is Intended to supple- 
ment and extend the required work in this field. Diagnosis, life histories 
of parasites and their vectors, and control measures are considered with 
special reference to tropical medicine. 

The department has been the recipient of the Marcelle Fleischmann 
Memorial Fund for the study of immunologic and allergic phenomena in 
tropical diseases. Third or fourth year students may associate themselves 
with one of the several research projects being carried out under this 
grant. 



RADIOLOGY 

SYDNEY WEINTRAUB, Professor of Clinical Radiology. Acting Head of Depart- 
ment. 
HAROLD L. TEMPLE, Professor of Clinical Radiology. 
JAMES J. NICKSON, Associate Professor of Radiology. 
RALPH F. PHILLIPS, Associate Professor of Radiology. 
ROBERT S. SHERMAN, Associate Professor of Radiology. 
HARRY W. BURNETT, Assistant Professor of Radiology. 
CHARLES T. DOTTER, Assistant Professor of Radiology. 
JOHN A. EVANS, Assistant Professor of Radiology. 
ELIZABETH F. FOCHT, Assistant Professor of Radiology (Physics). 
GEORGE JASPIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. 
WENDELL C. PEACOCK, Assistant Professor of Radiology (Physics). 
T. ARTHUR PEARSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. 
ISRAEL STEINBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology (Medicine). 
STEPHEN WHITE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. 
EDUARDO CACERES, Instructor in Radiology. 
FLORENCE CHU, Instructor in Radiology. 
FRANCIS M. CUMMINS, Instructor in Radiology. 
FORBES DELANY, Instructor in Radiology. 
ALFRED W. KANY, Instructor in Radiology. 
JOHN L. McCLENAHAN, Instructor in Radiology. 
EMIL H. SCHNAP, Instructor in Radiology. 
IRVING SCHWARTZ, Instructor in Radiology. 
HENRY M. SELBY, Instructor in Radiology. 
JOHN J. SNODGRASS, Instructor in Radiology. 
ANDRE S. CAPIDAGLIS, Assistant in Radiology. 
HERBERT G. KANTOR, Assistant in Radiology. 

The teaching of radiology is conducted by didactic lectures, by 
section work with smaller groups in connection with clinical clerkships, 
and by presentation of the X-ray aspects of various cases at the regular 
conferences of the clinical departments. Moreover, elective courses given 
in the fourth year play an important part in supplementing these meth- 
ods, A large film and lantern slide museum of cases carefully selected for 
their teaching value has been prepared. This is constantly added to from 
the abundant material passing through the department. Three floors of the 
L Building are assigned to X-ray work. In addition, equipment for special 
examinations is located in the Woman's Clinic, Urology, Psychiatry, and 
elsewhere in the Medical College and Hospital. 

During the first year, in collaboration with the Department of Anat- 
omy, anatomical structures are visualized by radiographic and rotentgen- 
oscopic methods. 

The didactic work consists of a series of eleven lectures to the entire 
second year class. These include the fundamental principles of radia- 
tion physics. X-ray diagnosis. X-ray and radium therapy, with the aim 

78 



RADIOLOGY 79 

of making the student aware at this stage of the various uses of X-rays. 
The indications and Hmitations are stressed. 

Section work is conducted in the third year, while the students are 
serving as clinical clerks. The Departments of Medicine, Pediatrics, and 
Surgery assign each group receiving instruction from them to the De- 
partment of Radiology for regularly scheduled informal sessions. Specifi- 
cally related X-ray material is presented and correlated with the clinical 
and laboratory findings. These sessions total approximately thirty hours. 

ELECTIVES 

Fourth Year: 

(1) X-ray Clinical Clerkships. A limited number of students are 
accepted to observe, and assist where possible, in the routine activities of 
the department. The routine includes film interpretations, fluoroscopy, 
therapeutic irradiation, and attendance at radiology conferences. Two 
conferences are held daily (L-611) at which time the more interesting 
diagnostic and therapeutic problems are discussed. One conference is held 
from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. The second session, from 1 p.m. to 2 
p.m., is limited to a review of the current examinations of the gastroin- 
testinal tract. 

(2) Angiocardiography and Cardiac Catheterization. Individual in- 
struction available for interested students. 



SURGERY 

FRANK GLENN, Professor of Surgery. 

ALEXANDER BRUNSCHWIG, Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

GUILFORD S. DUDLEY, Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN M. McLEAN, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 

ARTHUR PALMER, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology). 

JOHN M. PEARCE, Professor of Pathology in Surgery. 

BRONSON S. RAY, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). 

FRANK E. ADAIR, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

WILLIAM A. BARNES, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

CHARLES G. CHILD, III, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

BRADLEY L. COLEY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

HERBERT CONWAY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Plastic Surgery). 

WILLIAM A. COOPER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

NELSON W. CORNELL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN W. DRAPER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 

JOHN H. ECKEL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

KRISTIAN G. HANSSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Physical Medi- 
cine). 

CRANSTON W. HOLMAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

FREDERICK L. LIEBOLT, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 

WILLIAM F. MacFEE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

VICTOR F. MARSHALL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 

HAYES E. MARTIN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

GERVAIS W. McAULIFFE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryn- 
gology). 

ALLISTER M. McLELLAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 

JAMES A. MOORE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology). 

SAMUEL W. MOORE, Associate Professor of Chnical Surgery. 

WILLIAM F. NICKEL, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

GEORGE T. PACK, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

RUSSEL H. PATTERSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

E. COOPER PERSON, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

HENRY T. RANDALL, Associate Professor of Surgery. 

FRED W. STEWART, Associate Professor of Surgical Pathology. 

PRESTON A. WADE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

JOSEPH F. ARTUSIO, Jr., Assistant Professor of Surgery (Anesthesiology). 

IRVIN BALENSWEIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ortiiopedics). 

MILTON L. BERLINER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 

GEORGE E. BINKLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

ARTHUR D. CONSOLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). 

MICHAEL R. DEDDISH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

JAMES A. DINGWALL, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

EDWARD A. DUNLAP, Assistant Professor of Chnical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 

GEORGE F. EGAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Dental Surgery). 

JOHN T. ELLIS, Assistant Professor of Pathology in Surgery. 

JOSEPH H. FARROW, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

GEORGE A. FIEDLER, Assistant Professor of Chnical Surgery (Urology). 
EDGAR L. FRAZELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
HAROLD GEN VERT, Assistant Professor of Chnical Surgery. 

JOHN C. A. GERSTER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

80 



SURGERY 81 

DAN M. GORDON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 

NORMAN L. HIGINBOTHAM, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

GUSTAVUS A. HUMPHREYS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 

D. REES JENSEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

SAMUEL F. KELLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology). 

ERNEST W. LAMPE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery! 

FRANK J. McGOWAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

FREDERICK C. McLELLAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 

GORDON P. McNEER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

LAURENCE MISCALL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Bellevue).. 

WARD D. O'SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

HERBERT PARSONS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN L. POOL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

HERBERT J. RIEKERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 

JOHN G. SCHMIDT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 

STUART S. SNYDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 

JOHN E. SUTTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

NORMAN L. TREVES, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

FRANCIS P. TWINEM, Assistant Professor of CHnical Surgery (Urology). 

F. STEPHEN VOGEL, Assistant Professor of Pathology in Surgery. 

WILLIAM L. WATSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN P. WEST, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

WILLET F. WHITMORE, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology.) 

HELENA GILDER, Research Associate in Surgery. 

DOYLE JOSLIN, Research Associate in Surgery. 

LEONARD ANDORS, Instructor in Surgery. 

JACOB APPLEBAUM, Instructor in Surgery. 

WILLIAM H. AYRES, Instructor in Surgery. 

GEORGE B. BANNISTER, Assistant in Surgery. 

IRVING BARAS, Instructor in Surgery. 

STANLEY J. BEHRMAN, Instructor in Surgery. 

ANNE M. BELCHER, Instructor in Surgery. 

FRANCIS A. BENEVENTI, Instructor in Surgery. 

LEMUEL BOWDEN, Instructor in Surgery. 

WILLIAM G. CAHAN, Instructor in Surgery. 

THOMAS I. CAREY, Instructor in Surgery. 

DANIEL CATLIN, Instructor in Surgery. 

EDWARD C. COATS, Instructor in Surgery. 

ELIZABETH F. CONSTANTINE, Instructor in Surgery. 

ALEXANDER CONTE, Instructor in Surgery. 

CARLTON M. CORNELL, Instructor in Surgery. 

WILLIAM W. DANIEL, Instructor in Surgery. 

ROBERT D. DEANS, Instructor in Surgery. 

J. EDWIN DREW, Instructor in Surgery. 

WADE DULEY, Instructor in Surgery. 

HOWARD S. DUNBAR, Instructor in Surgery. 

FRANK W. FARRELL, Instructor in Surgery. 

.AUSTIN I. FINK, Instructor in Surgery. 

EDGAR P. FLEISCHMANN, Instructor in Surgery. 

ALFRED M. FRANCIS, Instructor in Surgery. 

MILTON GABEL, Instructor in Surgery. 

THOMAS J. GARRICK, Instructor in Surgery. 

ARTHUR L. GORE, Instructor in Surgery. 

JAMES L. GREEN, Instructor in Surgery.' 



82 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

EUGENE J. GUENARD, Instructor in Surgery. 
JAMES O. HALE, Instructor in Surgery. 
JAMES S. HARRISON, Instructor in Surgery. 
BRUCE HEINZEN, Instructor in Surgery. 
JAMES M. HOLMAN, Instructor in Surgery. 
GEORGE R. HOLSWADE, Instructor in Surgery. 
RUSSELL H. HOOKER, Instructor in Surgery. 
SUZANNE A. L. HOWE, Instructor in Surgery. 
FRANK J. HYNES, Instructor in Surgery. 
ROBERT A. JOHNSON, Instructor in Surgery. 
JOSEPH T. KAUER, Instructor in Surgery. 
JAMES T. KELLY, Instructor in Surgery. 
MICHAEL LAU, Instructor in Surgery. 
BERNARD MAISEL, Instructor in Surgery. 
BENJAMIN E. MARBURY, Instructor in Surgery. 
ROSS S. McELWEE, Instructor in Surgery. 
CHARLES T. MEACHAM, Instructor in Surgery. 
LEOPOLD MEHLER, Instructor in Surgery. 
CHARLES J. MILLER, Instructor in Surgery. 
OLIVER S. MOORE, Instructor in Surgery. 
JUAN NEGRIN, Instructor in Surgery. 
JOHN B. OGILVIE, Instructor in Surgery. 
EARL A. O'NEILL, Instructor in Surgery. 
ERIC C. RICHARDSON, Instructor in Surgery. 
GUY F. ROBBINS, Instructor in Surgery. 
JAMES G. ROBERTSON, Instructor in Surgery. 
CARL J. SCHMIDLAPP, III, Instructor in Surgery. 
DAVID S. SPEER, Instructor in Surgery. 
RICHARD B. STARK, Instructor in Surgery. 
MAUS W. STEARNS, Jr., Instructor in Surgery. 
JOHN F. STRUVE, Instructor in Surgery. 
WILLIS M. WEEDEN, Instructor in Surgery. 
WILFRED D. WINGEBACH, Instructor in Surgery. 
WILLIAM I. WOLFF, Instructor in Surgery. 
DANIEL M. HAYS, Research Fellow in Surgery. 
EDWARD B. C. KEEFER, Research Fellow in Surgery. 
DAVID BARR, Assistant in Surgery. 
WILLIAM E. BEAVEN, Assistant in Surgery. 
JOHN J. BOWE, Assistant in Surgery. 
DAVID S. BREEN, Assistant in Surgery. 
McHENRY S. BREWER, Assistant in Surgery. 
MITCHELL BRICE, Assistant in Surgery. 
MALCOLM W. BULMER, Assistant in Surgery. 
GEORGE N. CORNELL, Assistant in Surgery. 
DANIEL L. CRANDELL, Assistant in Surgery. 
FREDERICK M. DAVIES, Assistant in Surgery. 
DANIEL W\ DAVIS, Assistant in Surgery. 
STUART M. DENMARK, Assistant in Surgery. 
BLAISE DRAPEAU, Assistant in Surgery. 
CHARLES F. DYER, Assistant in Surgery. 
ARMANDO M. ESPINOSA, Assistant in Surgery. 
JOHN R. FENCER, Assistant in Surgery. 
EDWARD A. FREE, Assistant in Surgery. 




SURGERY 83 



J. GEORGE FUREY, Assistant in Surgery. 
CHARLES S. HARRISON, Assistant in Surgery. 
ALBERT P. ISENHOUR, Jr., Assistant in Surgery. 
RICHARD KARL, Assistant in Surgery. 
THOMAS C. KERNS, Jr., Assistant in Surgery. 
ANTONIO F. LaSORTE, Assistant in Surgery. 
ROY E. LAU, Assistant in Surgery. 
JIM F. LINCOLN, Assistant in Surgery. 
EDWARD E. LONGABAUGH, Assistant in Surgery. 
HENRY MANNIX, Jr., Assistant in Surgery. 
LESTER W. MARTIN, Assistant in Surgery. 
ROY D. McCLURE, Jr., Assistant in Surgery. 
FREDERICK M. MITCHELL, Assistant in Surgery. 
EDWARD W. D. NORTON, Assistant in Surgery. 
ALBERT J. PAQUIN, Assistant in Surgery. 
ROBERT A. W. PULLMAN, Assistant in Surgery. 
S. FRANK REDO, Assistant in Surgery. 
JAMES A. SCOFIELD, Assistant in Surgery. 
ROBERT M. SPELLMAN, Assistant in Surgery. 
BJORN THORBJARNARSON, Assistant in Surgery. 
GEORGE TWEDDEL, Assistant in Surgery. 
GEORGE E. WANTZ, Jr., Assistsnt in Surgery. 
DONALD L. WEEKS, Assistant in Surgery. 
PAUL C. WETZIG, Assistant in Surgery. 
JOSEPH R. WILDER, Assistant in Surgery. 



GENERAL SURGERY 



SECOND YEAR . . . During the third term of the second year, two 
hours a week will be devoted to history taking and examination of sur- 
gical patients. Total hours, 22. 

THIRD YEAR ... In the third year, students will spend the entire time 
for one term in the out-patient department, both for general surgery and 
the surgical specialties. During this time they will gain experience in 
history taking, physical examination, diagnostic work-up, and care of 
out-patients. Here, the students come in contact with patients exhibiting 
a wide variety of surgical conditions. 

During this term, for four morning and four afternoon sessions in the 
diagnostic clinic of general surgery and also in the minor surgery clinic, 
students will work on patients, make a differential diagnosis and formu- 
late treatment in conference with a senior instructor. One lecture each 
week is devoted to fractures, and in addition, each student spends one 
afternoon a week in the fracture clinic. During the week, three confer- 
ences with the entire group and a senior instructor are held, at which 
time selected topics are presented and discussed. A course in operative 
surgery on animals, designed to emphasize the fundamental principles 
of surgery will occupy one morning each week. 

A surgical cHnic is held at the noon hour for students of the third 



84 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

year, throughout the year. A weekly clinic pathological conference is 
held, attended by both the third and fourth year students. Time, 330 
hours. 

FOURTH YEAR . . . During the time assigned to surgery in the fourth 
year, the students spend their entire time on the surgical pavilions as 
clinical clerks. This allows the opportunity of following each patient to 
the X-ray Department and to the operating room and also of following 
specimens in Surgical Pathology. In conjunction with this, a surgical 
symposium is held each week, at which time recent advances in surgery 
are discussed. An X-ray conference and a tumor conference, as well as 
a conference in surgical pathology is given weekly, in order to correlate 
all findings in regard to individual patients. One hour each day is devoted 
to a conference in general surgery or one of the specialties including 
neurosurgery, chest surgery, and plastic surgery. Both the third and 
fourth year classes attend the grand surgical rounds each week. Time, 
264 hours. 

OPHTHALMOLOGY . . . During the third term of the second year, the 
entire class receives instruction in microscopy of the eye including the 
pathology of such important diseases as uveitis, glaucoma, intraocular 
tumors, tuberculosis, injuries, and sympathetic ophthalmia. Introduction 
to special diagnosis, techniques, and particularly use of the ophthalmo- 
scope, is given at this time. Total hours, 22. 

In the term of the third year assigned to surgery, a series of lectures 
and clinical demonstrations is held one afternoon a week in which the 
commoner eye conditions encountered in the out-patient department and 
on the wards are covered. At the same time each student spends a limited 
period of time in the Ophthalmological Clinic. 

In the term of the fourth year assigned to surgery, the students are 
rotated in small groups through the out-patient department for examina- 
tion, diagnosis, and treatment of patients under supervision. This is sup- 
plemented by conferences and ward rounds. 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY . . . During each trimester in surgery of 
the third year, there is one lecture a week in orthopedic surgery which 
serves as an introduction to the clinical work in the surgical wards. Stu- 
dents work in the orthopedic out-patient clinic during the entire period 
of 11 weeks. 

In the fourth year a limited number of students serve as clinical clerks 
on the orthopedic pavilion. 

OTOLARYNGOLOGY ... In the surgical term of the third year, for- 
mal clinical lectures are given. The anatomy of the head is reviewed, 
and instruction in the examination of the ear, nose, and throat is given. 



SURGERY 85 

The subjects of bronchoscopy and rhinoplasty are discussed. Students 
spend one afternoon each week in the otolaryngological out-patient de- 
partment and have the opportunity to study cases on the pavilions as 
well. During this period, special topics are presented to the section by 
various members of the teaching staff. 

Opportunity is offered during the elective term of the fourth year to 
spend additional time on this subject. 

UROLOGY . . . The teaching of urology is carried out by means of 
lectures and clinics during the surgical term of the third year, at which 
time patients suffering from a wide variety of urological conditions are 
presented. The teaching is supplemented by experience in the urological 
wards and out-patient department. 



MILITARY MEDICINE 

DONALD G. W. BROOKING, Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

This is an elective course currently offered in seventy-seven medical 
schools throughout the country under the joint auspices of the U. S. 
Army and the U. S. Air Force. It is a progressive course extending 
through the four years and consisting of a one hour period each week 
and, in addition, one six weeks' summer training camp. Upon graduation 
from medical college each student who completes the course in Military 
Medicine is commissioned a First Lieutenant in the Medical Corps of the 
U. S. Army Reserve or the U. S, Air Force Reserve. (Except in time of 
national emergency Reserve Officers are called to active duty only with 
their own consent.) 

Any male citizen who meets the physical and other requirements for 
commission in the Officers' Reserve Corps is eligible for enrollment in 
the course, and all other medical students are welcome to sit in on 
classes. Those who have reser\^e commissions in the Navy, Marine Corps, 
or Coast Guard may not be enrolled in the Advanced Course, which 
begins in the junior year, without first resigning such commissions. 

There are no financial considerations involved in the Basic Course 
extending through the freshman and sophomore years, but during the 
Advanced Course each student is paid a commutation of subsistence 
amounting to approximately $260 a year in addition to the pay he re- 
ceives while in attendance at the summer camp and travel allowances to 
camp and return. Uniforms are worn only during the period of the 
Medical ROTC camp. 

Military Medicine is essentially preventive medicine, and the course is 
designed to supplement the regular medical curriculum by providing such 
training as would enable the young physician to take his place and func- 
tion efficiently in the armed forces without additional time-consuming 
preliminary training, or to assume a position of medical leadership in a 
civilian catastrophe situation and the planning and organization in antic- 
ipation thereof. During the Basic Course the organization of the Army 
and the Air Force and their Medical Services, and the tactical employ- 
ment of the components thereof are explained. The fundamentals of 
military law and administration are taught together with map reading, 
emergency care, and evacuation of the wounded. 

During the Advanced Course while orthodox clinical medicine, sur- 
gery, and psychiatry are being learned in the regular curriculum, Military 
Medicine presents the modifications necessitated by the catastrophe situ- 
ation. Preventive medicine in its many practical military applications 
receives the greatest attention, while additional subjects include field 
medicine and surgery, military psychiatry, the medical aspects of atomic, 

86 



MILITARY MEDICINE 87 

chemical, and biological warfare, and military medical research and 
developments. 

The principles of military medicine are the same principles that govern 
the successful management of civilian catastrophe situations, so in this 
atomic era it is urged that all medical students avail themselves of the 
increased preparedness afforded by the medical ROTC program. 



The Graduate School 



The Graduate Faculty of the Medical College at present consists of 
professors in the preclinical branches of medicine who accept properly 
qualified students as candidates for the higher academic degrees. The 
qualifications required of graduate students are in every particular those 
which are required of students in other divisions of the University. Stu- 
dents desiring to enter the Graduate School for work in the medical 
sciences must direct their applications to: The Graduate School, Cornell 
University Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York 21, N.Y. The 
present faculty representative, Professor C. V. Morrill, may be consulted 
at any time for further information. Because of limitations in space, only 
a few students can be accommodated in each department. A personal 
interview is required of all applicants before the filing of forms. For a 
description of the work in the Medical College in New York City, con- 
sult other sections of this Announcement. 

To be admitted to the Graduate School, an applicant ( 1 ) must have 
received his baccalaureate degree from a college or university of recog- 
nized standing, or have done work equivalent to that required for such 
degree; (2) as judged by his previous scholastic record, or otherwise, 
must show promise of ability satisfactorily to pursue advanced study and 
research; and (3) must have had adequate previous preparation in his 
chosen field of study to enter at once upon graduate study in that field. 
An applicant who is not a graduate of Cornell University must submit 
complete official transcripts of all previous college studies. 

Students may be admitted to the Graduate School at the Medical 
College in one of the following two classes : ( 1 ) candidates for degrees ; 
^2) graduate students not candidates for degrees ("non-candidates"). 

For more detailed information concerning the rules and regulations 
covering graduate work in the Graduate School, the Announcement of 
the Graduate School should be consulted by the candidate before appli- 
cation for admission. A copy of this Announcement may be obtained at 
the Administrative Office of the Medical College or directly from the 
Graduate School, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. 

TUITION AND OTHER FEES 

A TUITION FEE of $250 each term is to be paid by all students regis- 
tered in the Graduate School. It is payable at the beginning of each term. 
A member of the teaching or scientific staff registered in the Graduate 
School at the Medical College may receive a partial waiver of tuition 

88 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 89 

fees subject to the limitations stated on page 31 of the Announcement of 
the Graduate School, 1951-1952. 

Graduate students holding certain appointments as University Fellows 
or Graduate Scholars and holders of certain temporary fellowships and 
scholarships are exempt from the payment of the tuition fee. 

AN ADMINISTRATIVE FEE of $10.00 a term, payable at the begin- 
ning of each term, is to be paid by all students registered in the Graduate 
School. 

A MATRICULATION FEE of $15 is required of every student upon 
his first entrance into the University. It must be paid at the time of 
registration and is not refundable. 

A GRADUATION FEE of $10 is required, at least ten days before the 
degree is to be conferred, of every candidate for an advanced degree. 
The fee will be returned if the degree is not conferred. 

TUITION SCHOLARSHIPS 

For graduate students, the Board of Trustees has established thirty 
tuition scholarships. They entitle the holder to exemption from payment 
of tuition fees, but not other fees, for the duration of the appointment. 
Applications should be made to the professor, or professors, in whose 
field the applicant is working, or to the office of the Graduate School by 
March 1 of the academic year preceding that for which the award is 
desired. Awards are made in April of each year. 



special Students 



All students not registered in Cornell University Graduate School and 
not registered for the M.D. degree are Special Students. These are 
Special Students in the true sense of the word and must be especially 
qualified in preparation, ability, and objective in order to receive any 
consideration. They may or may not be graduate students in the sense 
of having completed work for a collegiate degree. They are admitted 
only by the consent of the head of the department and must be registered 
in the Administrative Office of the Medical College and must pay their 
fees at the Business Office before being admitted to lectures or laboratory 
periods. They are required to carry and show on demand of the author- 
ities a permit of attendance. 

FEES 

Matriculation Fee $10 

Administration Fee $ 5 

Tuition fees vary depending upon the type of work taken. 

A breakage fee may be required. 



90 



Table of Required Hours 

First Second Third Fourth 

Year Year Year Year Total 

ANATOMY: 

Gross Anat. of the Human Body 374 

Histology and Embryology 180 

Neuro-Anatomy 84 638 

BIOCHEMISTRY 220 220 

BACTERIOLOGY 55 88 143 

PHYSIOLOGY 110 121 231 

PATHOLOGY 308 308 

PHARMACOLOGY 121 121 

MEDICINE: 

Physical Diagnosis 121 

Clinical Pathology 77 

Neurology 33 

Specialties, Clerkship & OPD. . . 297 264 

Lectures 22 33 11 858 

SURGERY: 

Ophthalmology 22 

Introductory Surgery 22 

Specialties, Clerkship & OPD. . . 297 264 

Lectures 33 638 

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY: 

Practical Instruction 66 264 

Lectures 66 396 

PEDIATRICS: 

Practical Instruction 132 40 

Lectures 33 11 216 

PSYCHIATRY: 

Psychobiology 22 

Psychiatry 33 33 48 

Lectures 33 169 

PUBLIC HEALTH: 

Parasitology 33 

Field and Section 22 33 

Lectures 11 33 11 143 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 18 18 

RADIOLOGY 11 11 

ELECTIVE HOURS (440) 

Totals 1045 1045 1074 946 4TT0 

( ) Elective time not included in totals. 

91 



92 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE 

1951-1952 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Histology 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


10-11 


11-12 


12-1 














1-2 


Biochemistry 


Histology 


Free 


Biochemistry 


Biochemistry 




2-3 


Anatomy 


Histology 


Histology 


3-4 


4-5 





Mil. Med. 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Neuro- 
Anatomy 


Histology 


Anatomy 


Neuro- 
Anatomy 




Neuro- 
Anatomy* 
Histology 


10-11 


Library 
Lecturest 


11-12 


12-1 












1-2 


Biochemistry 


Anatomy 




Biochemistry 


Biochemistry 




2-3 


x\natomy 


Free 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


3-4 


4-5 






Mil. Med. 













Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Biochemistry 


Physiology 


Biochemistry 


Physiology 


Biochemistry 


Physiology 


10-11 


Bacteriology 


11-12 
12-1 






Psychobiol. 


Psychobiol. 


1-2 














2-3 


Bacteriology 


Physiology 


Free 


Bacteriology 


Biochemistry 




3-4 


4-5 


Mil. Med. 







* Five sessions Histology and 6 Neuro-.Anatomy. 
t When scheduled. 



SCHEDULE OF COURSES 

SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE 

1951-1952 



93 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 




Physiology 


Physiology 


Pharmacology 


Physiology 


Physiology 


10-11 


Pharmacology 


Bacteriology 


Pharmacology 


11-12 




12-1 


Bacteriology 


1-2 














2-3 


Bacteriology 


Physiology 


Free 


Para.sitology 


Bacteriology 


3-4 


4-5 


Mil. Med. 





Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Pathology 


Pathology 


Pathology 


Pathology 


Pathology 


Pathology 


10-11 


11-12 


12-1 




Mil. Med. 


1-2 






Free 








2-3 


Public 
Health 


Physical 
Diagnosis 


Physical 
Diagnosis 


Psychiatry 


3-4 


4-5 





Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 




~4^ 


Pathology 




ii- 


^5 






1^= 


Pathology 


10-11 










11-12 


12-1 


Appl. Pharm. 


Appl. Pharm. 


Introductory 
Medicine 


Neurology 


Introductory 
Medicine 




1-2 














2-3 


Clinical 
Pathology 


Clinical 
Pathology 


Free 


Introductory 
Surgery 


Clinical 
Pathology 




3-4 


4-5 


Ophthalmol- 
ogy 


Radiology 


Ophthalmol- 
ogy 




1 Mil. Med. 



















94 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

THIRD YEAR SCHEDULE 

1951-1952 



Hours 


Monday Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Group A: Medicine (1); Ob.-Gyn., Ped., Psych., Pb. HI. (2); Surgery (3). 
Group B: Surgery (1); Medicine (2); Ob.-Gyn., Ped., Psych., Pb. HI. (3). 
Group C: Ob.-Gyn., Ped., Psych., Pb. HI. (1); Surgery (2); Medicine (3). 


10-11 


11-12 


12-1 


Pediatrics 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Surgery 


Medicine 


Pb. HI. 


Ob.-Gyn. 


1-2 














2-3 






Free 




3-4 


4-5 


C.P.C. 







DETAILED SCHEDULE — HALF TERM (5!/2 WEEKS) 
PEDIATRICS 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Pediatrics 


10-11 


11-12 


12-1 


Pediatrics 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Surgery 


Medicine 


Pb.-HI. 


Ob.-Gyn. 


1-2 














2-3 




Pediatrics 


Free 


Pediatrics 


3-4 


4-5 


C.P.C. 







DETAILED SCHEDULE — HALF TERM (51/2 WEEKS) 

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY, PSYCHIATRY, 

PUBLIC HEALTH, CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Contag. 
Diseases 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Pb. HI. 


Free 


10-11 


11-12 


12-1 


Pediatrics 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Surgery 


Medicine 


Pb. HI. 


Ob.-Gyn. 


1-2 














2-3 




Psychiatry 


Free 


Psychiatry 


Pb. HI. 


3^ 


4-5 


C.P.C. 



SCHEDULE OF COURSES 

FOURTH YEAR SCHEDULE 

1951-1952 

Five terms, 8 weeks each, July 9 to May 29 



95 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-1 


Group A 
Group B 
Group C 
Group D 
Group E 


—Med. (1); Surg. (2); Ob.-Gyn. (3); Ped., Psy., Elect. (4); Elect. (5). 
—Surg. (1); Ob.-Gyn. (2); Ped., Psy., Elect. (3); Elect. (4); Med. (5). 
—Ob.-Gyn. (1); Ped., Psy., Elect. (2); Elect. (3); Med. (4); Surg. (5). 
—Ped., Psy., Elect. (1); Elect. (2); Med. (3); Surg. (4); Ob.-Gyn. (5). 
—Elect. (1); Med. (2); Surg. (3); Ob.-Gyn. (4); Ped., Psy., Elect. (5). 


1-2 














2-3 






Psychiatry* 






3-4 


Med. Ped. J* 
Pb. HI.- 


4-5 


C.P.C. 





DETAILED SCHEDULE 
PEDIATRICS, PSYCHIATRY, ELECTIVES 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-1 


Pediatrics! 

or 

Electives 


Electives 


Pediatrics! 

or 

Electives 


Electives 


Pediatrics! 

or 

Electives 


Electives 


1-2 














2-3 


Psychiatry § 


Electives 


Psychiatry* 

Med., Ped.*t 
Pb. HI. 


Psychiatry § 


Electives 


3-4 


4-5 





ELECTIVES 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-1 


Electives 








1-2 












2-3 


Electives 


Psychiatry* 


Electives 


3-4 


Med., Ped.*t 
Pb. HI. 


4-5 













* Lectures not given during summer term. 

t One half of the group takes pediatrics for one month and electives for other month. 

t Eleven sessions each of medicine, pediatrics, and public health. 

§ Entire group takes psychiatry Mondays and Thursdays for two months. 



Internship AppointmentSj 
Class of 1951 



DOCTORS OF MEDICINE, JUNE 12, 1951 



Robert Churchill Ackles 
Augusta Strongman Alba 
James Davis Allan 
Robert Bedzofsky Beede 
Herbert Van Wie Bergamini 
Stanley Jack Birnbaum 
Albert James Blair, Jr. 
Peter Albert Bossart 
Warren Samuel Braveman 
Andrew Derick Bulkley 
David Sidney Burgoyne 
Robert Walter Burroughs 
George Henry Carman 
Nancy Jane Cole 
Harry Calvin Cramer 
Robert Harry Curtis 
Elmer William Davis 
Grayson Brown Davis 
Herbert Alexander Davis 
Elisabeth Burnett Decker 
Frederick Marsee Evans 
Floyd Howard Farrant 
Frederic Francis Flach 
Jack Milton Gershberg 
Hyman Louis Gildenhorn 
James Graham Gray 
Reuben William Griffith 
Philip Sidney Herbert 
Robert Louis Hirsch 
Henry Lyman Hood 
John Leroy Howard 
Peter Theodore Janulis 
William Huckel Jeffreys 
Ann Bradstreet Johnson 
Lowell Lowell Keirle 
George Thomas Kiss 
William Frederick Klinkerfuss 
Alfred Walter Kopf 
Oscar Rogers Kreusi 
Edith Anne Lechner 
Allen Maxwell Levy 
Harold Venable Liddle 



Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. 

Brooklyn Hospital, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Newark City Hospital, Newark, N.J. 

Buffalo General Hospital, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Conn. 

St. Luke's Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

King County Hospital, Seattle, Wash. 

Latter Day Saints Hospital, Salt Lake City 

University of Minn. Hospital, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, Mo. 

Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn. 

Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, N.Y.. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Charleston General Hospital, Charleston, W. Va. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Duke Hospital, Durham, N.C. 

Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, N.Y. 

Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Michael Reese Hospital, Chicago, III. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Kings County Hospital, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

U.S. Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Mich. 

Syracuse Medical Center, Syracuse, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Mt. Sinai Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio' 

Cincinnati General Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio 

St. Luke's Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Syracuse Medical Center, Syracuse, N.Y. 

City Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio 

St. Luke's Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Philadelphia General Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philadelphia General Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cincinnati General Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio- 



96 



INTERNSHIP APPOINTMENTS 



97 



Roger Potter Lochhead 
Howard Charles Lucas 
Walter Leonard Lynn 
John Henry McArdle 
Thomas Arthur McGraw 
Robert Joseph McKenna 
Ian MacKinnon 
Roy Wright Menninger 
Marie Madison Metoyer 
Patrick Joseph Mulrow 
Earl Addis Munyan 
Einil Neibart 
Dewey Allen Nelson 
Philip Andrew Nichols 
Avrum Bernard Organick 
Walter Matthew Palmer 
James Hutcheon Pert 
George Burton Pugh 
George Freeland Pugh 
Donn Richard Quinn 
Sanford Maxwell Reiss 
Carol Remmer 
Douglas James Roberts 
Kenneth Roth 
John Joseph Rousseau 
Theodore John Rusnack 
Edwin Philip Russell 
George Adam Simpson 
Jay Brady Skelton 
Lyle Richardson Smith 
Elizabeth Howard Sprague 
James Hawley Stephenson 
Jack Frederick Stuart 
Walter James Sullivan 
Edward Bruce Swain 
Kenneth Stryker Thomson 
William Andrew Triebel 
Paul Richard vom Eigen 
William Wait Ward 
Carl Wierum 
Mary Margaret Wilber 
Robert Howard Wilkinson 
James Oscar Wynn 



Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Genesee Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y, 

Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

Duke Hospital, Durham, N.C. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y, 

Mary Hitchcock Hospital, Hanover, N.H. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Newark City Hospital, Newark, N.J, 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Charity Hospital, New Orleans, La. 

Kings County Hospital, Brooklyn, N.Y, 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, N.Y, 

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

Kings County Hospital, Brooklyn, N,Y, 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

LTniversity Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio 

Butterworth Hospital, Grand Rapids, Mich, 

Robert Packer Hospital, Sayre, Penna. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N,Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn. 

Mt, Sinai Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

King County Hospital, Seattle, Wash. 

St. Vincent's Hospital, New York, N.Y, 

Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, N,Y, 

Mary Hitchcock Hospital, Hanover, N.H. 

Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

Philadelphia General Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

St. Luke's Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Santa Clara Co. Hospital, San Jose, Cal. 

Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Fla. 

LIniv. of Virginia Hospital, Charlottesville, Va. 

U.S. Army-Walter Reed Hospital, Washington, D.C. 

Genesee Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Mary Hitchcock Hospital, Hanover, N.H, 

New York Hospital, New York, N,Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, N.Y, 

Roosevelt Hospital, New York, N,Y. 



Kegister of StudentSj 1951-1952 



FOURTH YEAR 



Irwin Alan Almenoff, B.S. 1948, College of the City of New York Brooklyn, N.Y. 

James Douglas Alway, Jr., B.S. 1950, University of South Dakota Aberdeen, S. Dak. 



Julius Joseph Baber, A.B. 1948, St. Peter's College 

John Hart Balise, A.B. 1948, Amherst College 

Gerald Samuel Barad, A.B. 1947, Cornell University 

Elizabeth Barrows, A.B. 1948, Smith College 

John Weldon Bellville, A.B. 1948, Cornell University 

Irving Myron Blatt, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 

Louis Bove, A.B. 1948, Bowdoin College 

Robert Jay Boyer, A.B. 1948, Oberlin College 

John Wickhff Bromley, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 

Norman Slingerland Buys, A.B. 1948, Cornell University 

Arthur Stephen Carlson, A.B. 1941, Brooklyn College 

William Anderson Coleman, A.B. 1949, Dartmouth College 

John Michael Connolly, B.S. 1948, Fordham University 

William Cooper, B.S. 1948, Queens College 

William Lloyd Craver, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 

Raymond Joseph Donovan, B.S. 1949, Manhattan College 



Jersey City, N.J. 

Northampton, Mass. 

New York, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Elmira, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Portland, Maine 

Palisade, NJ. 

Jamaica, N.Y. 

Canton, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Hanover, N.H. 

Port Washington, N.Y. 

Hollis, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Staten Island, N.Y. 



Lawrence Mance Ervin, B.S. 1946, College of the City of New York New York, N.Y. 



Lester Mahan Felton, Jr., A.B. 1948, Dartmouth College 

Peter Jay Fennel, B.S. 1948, Bowdoin College 

Charles Pennock Foote, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 

George William Frimpter, A.B. 1948, Williams College 

James Clark Gammill, A.B. 1947, University of Illinois 

Thomas Aquinas Gilday, B.S. 1948, Mount Saint Mary's College 

Roy Glasgow Gill, A.B. 1937, L'niversity of Oklahoma, 

LL.B. 1940, Yale University 
David Goebel, A.B. 1947, Columbia University 
Waldo Greenspan, B.S. 1944, Rutgers L^niversity 
John Douglas Hallock, A.B. 1948, Cornell University 
Leon Irving Hammer, A.B. 1948, Cornell University 
Leston Laycock Havens, A.B. 1947, Williams College 
WiUiam Norbert Hill, Jr., A.B. 1948, Wesleyan University 
Russell Sherman Hoxsie, A.B. 1948, Wesleyan University 
Joseph Kantor Indenbaum, A.B. 1948, Cornell University 
William Arthur Jamison, A.B. 1948, Lafayette College 
George Johnson, Jr., B.S. 1949, University of North Carolina 
Theodore Inslee Jones, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
Martin David Keller, A.B. 1944, Yeshiva University, 

M.S. 1946, Ph.D. 1949, New York University 
Thomas Killip, III, A.B. 1948, Swarthmore College 
John Francis Kurtzke, B.S. 1948, St. John's University 
John Rudolf Langstadt, B.S. 1948, Queens College 
John Unger Lanman, A.B. 1948, Cornell University 
Frederic William Lathrop, Jr., A.B. 1949, Cornell University 



Worcester, Mass. 

South Portland, Maine 

Warsaw, N.Y. 

Haverstraw, N.Y. 

Shelbyville, Tenn. 

New York, N.Y. 



Okmulgee, Okla. 

Yonkers, N.Y. 

Perth Amboy, N.J. 

Jackson Heights, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Bridgehampton, N.Y. 

Gales Ferry, Conn. 

Auburndale, Mass. 

New York, N.Y. 

Bradley Beach, N.J. 

Wilmington, N.C. 

New York, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Rochester, N.Y. 

Kew Gardens, N.Y. 

Flushing, N.Y. 

Hammond, Ind. 

Plainfield, NJ. 



98 



STUDENTS 



09 



N.Y. 

NJ. 
N.Y. 

R.I. 



Robert Earl Lee, A.B. 1948, Colgate University 

Richard Lcnnihan, Jr., B.S. 1948, Harvard University 

Roy Hilty Lucas, University of Florida 

Keith McLoud, A.B. 1949, Dartmouth College 

Franklin Bruce Merrill, A.B. 1948, Stanford University 

Audrey Wilkins Mertz, B.S. 1948, Carnegie Institute of Technology 

James Lawrence Mertz, A.B. 1948, University of Colorado 

John Andrev^ Mitchell, A.B. 1947, Williams College 

Ralph Bryan Moore, Jr., A.B. 1948, Cornell University 

David Marten Niceberg, A.B. 1948, Cornell University 

Sterling Wallace Obenour, Jr., A.B. 1948, Ohio State University 

Charles William Parton, A.B. 1947, Kenyon College 

Russel Hugo Patterson, Jr., A.B. 1948, Stanford LIniversity 

Walter Leon Peretz, A.B. 1947, Princeton University 

Richard Earl Perkins, A.B. 1948, Cornell LIniversity 

Clinton Burns Potter, A.B. 1948, Princeton University 

Peter Peter Poulos, B.S. 1947, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Arthur George Prangley, Jr., A.B. 1949, Cornell University 

Ricardo Enrique Rengel, A.B. 1948, Cornell University 

Philip Sloan Robbins, A.B. 1948, Cornell University 

Burton Rubin, B.S. 1947, College of the City of New York 

Herbert Simeon Sacks, A.B. 1948, Dickinson College 

WiUis Sanderson, B.S. 1948, Maryville College 

Edwin Colby Sevringhaus, A.B. 1948, Swarthmore College 

Lewis Shenker, B.S. 1948, University of Michigan 

George Seamon Shields, B.S. 1948, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Stuart Robinson Silver, A.B. 1948, Dartmouth College 
Peter Edwin Stokes, B.S. 1948, Trinity College 
Frank Joseph Sullivan, A.B. 1948, Cornell University 
Bernard Edwin Swanson, A.B. 1950, Colgate University 
Frank Bell Throop, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
James David Van Doren, A.B. 1948, Cornell University 
Alan Van Poznak, A.B. 1948, Cornell University 
Robert Morris Wagner, B.S. 1949, University of Wyoming 
Virginia Davidson Weeks, A.B. 1948, Vassar College 
Richard Jay Weishaar, A.B. 1949, 

Cornell University Grand View on the Hudson, N.Y. 

Sidney Lee Werkman, A.B. 1948, WilHams College Washington, D.C. 

Robert Edward Wieche, A.B. 1948, Miami University Hamilton, Ohio 

Herbert Ambrose Zaccheo, A.B. 1949, Cornell University Kingston, N.Y. 



Woodmere, N.Y. 

Vineyard Haven, Mass. 

Winter Haven, Fla. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Ogden, Utah 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Trinidad, Colo. 

Newark, Ohio 

Cattaraugus, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Zanesville, Ohio 

Bronxville, N.Y. 

New York, 

Newark, 

Newark, 

Providence, 

Newark, N.J. 

E. Orange, N.J. 

San Juan, Puerto Rico 

New Bedford, Mass. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Elmhurst, N.Y. 

Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Essex Fells, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Ridge wood, N.J. 

Akron, Ohio 

Haddon Heights, N.J. 

Bayside, N.Y. 

New Rochelle, N.Y. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Chaumont, N.Y. 

Maplewood, N.J. 

Laramie, Wyo. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 



THIRD YEAR 



Charles Peter Albright, A.B. 1949, Allegheny College 

John Symington Aldridge, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Kenneth Collett Archibald, St. Lawrence University 

Frank Myrick Ash, A.B. 1949, Williams College 

Bennett Barton, A.B. 1949, Princeton University 

Barbara Bates, A.B. 1949, Smith College 

Stephen Lamar Bennett, B.S. 1949, Queens College 

Richard Harrod Blank, Emory University 

David Myron Bloom, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

David Albert Blumenstock, B.S. 1949, Union College 

John Benjamin Branche, B.S. 1949, Queens College 



Alexandria, Va. 

New York, N.Y. 

White Plains, N.Y. 

Ridge wood, N.J. 

Douglaston, N.Y. 

Auburn, N.Y. 

Queens Village, N.Y. 

Tampa, Fla. 

Binghamton, N.Y. 

South Orange, N.J. 

Jamaica, N.Y. 



100 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 



Carl Hannibal Brcnnan, Jr., A.B. 1949, University of Maine 

Robert Woods Brown, A.B. 1949, De Pauw University 

Frederick William Campbell, A.B. 1949, Yale University 

David Ignatius Canavan, A.B. 1949, St. Peter's College 

Arthur Chandler, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

George Tanner Conger, B.S. 1948, University of Akron 

Earnest M. Curtis, Jr., B.S. 1949, University of Alabama 

Elizabeth Vasiliki Despina Coryllos, A.B. 1949, Barnard College 

Richard La Vern Dexter, B.S. 1949, Albright College 

John Phillips Dorst, Pomona College 

Robert Harrison Edwards, A.B. 1949, University of North Carolina 

Harold J. EUner, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Ames Lawrence Filippone, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Marvin Irving Fox, A.B. 1948, Cornell University; M.S. 1949, 

University of Chicago 
Julia Louise Freitag, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
Catherine Bradford Friedrich, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
George Ripley Fuller, Swarthmore College 
John Donald Gallagher, B.S. 1949, Fordham College 
Aaron Ganz, A.B. 1949, New York University 
Robert DeForest Gens, A.B. 1949, Hamilton College 
Stanley Erwin Goodman, B.S. 1947, Trinity College, 

M.A. 1949, University of Pennsylvania 
William Anthony Grattan, B.S. 1949, Union College 
Robert Sherman Grayson, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Richard Stuart Green, A.B. 1949, Swarthmore College 
Whitney Eastman Greene, Jr., A.B. 1949, Brown University 
Ward Orin Griffen, Jr., A.B. 1948, Princeton LIniversity 
Peter Daniel Guggenheim, A.B. 1949, Cornell Lhiiversity 
Charles Lee Heiskell, Jr., B.S. 1947, The Citadel 
William Howard Hover, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
Richard Hills James, B.S. 1949, Columbia University 
Ira Hartley Kaufman, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
William Thomas Kelly, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
Calvin Murray Kunin, A.B. 1949, Columbia University 
James Mendon Ludwig, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Milton Norman Luria, A.B. 1949, Cornell LIniversity 
Charles Wright MacMillan, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Peter Raoul Mahrer, A.B. 1949, Brooklyn College 
Charles Anthony Malone, A.B. 1949, Oberlin College 
Richard Francis Mattingly, A.B. 1949, Ohio State University 
Robert Emmet McCabe, Jr., A.B. 1948, Williams College 
John Paul McCreary, Cornell LIniversity 
Allen Walter Mead, B.S. 1949, Davidson College 
Alice Mae Monroe, A.B. 1942, Brooklyn College; 

B.S. 1946, Cornell University 
Thomas Spurr Morse. A.B. 1950, Cornell LIniversity 
Jay Richard Olsen, B.S. 1949, Idaho State College 
Robert Heyde Orth, A.B. 1949, Hamilton College 
Jack Flemming Ostergaard, A.B. 1949, Dartmouth College 
Charles Wellington Pearce, Rice Institute 
Joseph Edward Plastaras, B.S. 1949, Manhattan College 
Richard Fleming Porter, A.B. 1949, University of Kansas 
Arnold Henry Randell, Jr., A.B. 1949, Kenyon College 
James Leon Reichard, B.S. 1949, Franklin and Marshall 



Bangor, Maine 

Elkhart, Ind. 

Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich. 

Ridgefield Park, N.J. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Akron, Ohio 

Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

New York, N.Y. 

Wellsboro, Pa. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Newark, N.J. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Hope Farm, N.Y. 

Red Wing, Minn. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Queens Village, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Floral Park, N.Y. 

Norwalk, Conn. 

Grafton, N.Y. 

Harrison, N.J. 

Flushing, N.Y. 

Dover, Mass. 

Pelham Manor, N.Y. 

Islip, N.Y. 

Pasadena, Calif. 

Montclair, N.J. 

Pelham, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Ithaca, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Virginia Beach, Va. 

Plattsburg, N.Y. 

Upper Montclair, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Zanesville, Ohio 

Charleston, W. Va. 

Poland, Ohio 

Florence, S.C. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Richmond, Mass. 

Pocatello, Idaho 

Greenwich, Conn. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Ballinger, Texas 

Lynbrook, N.Y. 

Concordia, Kansas 

Niles, Ohio 

York, Pa. 



STUDENTS 



101 



Jack Richard, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

William Kay Riker, A.B. 1949, Columbia University 

Harlan David Root, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Henry George Schmidt, Jr., Duke University 

Abraham Isaac Schweid, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Richard Tobias Silver, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Gerald Murray Silverman, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Paul Albert Skudder, A.B. 1949, Middlebury College 

David Elliott Sobel, A.B. 1949, University of North Carolina 

Charles Albert Stevens, Jr., A.B. 1949, Cornell University 

James Strickler, A.B. 1950, Dartmouth College 

Philip Tager, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 

Thomas Lee Taylor, B.S. 1949, University of Maryland 

Paul Richard Thornfeldt, A.B. 1949, Montana State University 

Kenneth Frederick Tucker, B.S. 1949, Columbia University 

John Tuckman, A.B. 1947, A.M. 1949, Harvard University 

CUfford Hohnholt Urban, A.B. 1949, Columbia University 

Heinz Valtin, A.B. 1949, Swarthmore College 

Richard Paul Wagner, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 

Richard Wellman, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 

Florence Arlene Wilson, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 

Edward Albert Wolfson, A.B. 1948, M.N.S. 1949, Cornell University Fairlawn, N.J. 

Bernard Arthur Yablin, A.B. 1948, Cornell University Watertown, N.Y. 



Yonkers, 


N.Y. 


New York, 


N.Y. 


Riders Mills, 


N.Y. 


East Orange 


,N.J. 


New York, 


N.Y. 


Lake Mahopac, 


N.Y. 


Forest Hills, 


N.Y. 


New Rochelle, 


N.Y. 


New York, 


N.Y. 


Wcstfield 


, N.J. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


New York, 


N.Y. 


Baltimore 


, Md. 


Helena, Mont. 


Brooklyn, 


N.Y. 


Flushing, 


N.Y. 


Astoria, 


N.Y. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Hurley, 


N.Y. 


New York, 


N.Y. 


Binghamton, 


N.Y. 



SECOND YEAR 

Fredrick Ralph Abrams, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Ronald Hunt Allen, B.S. 1950, Fordham University 

Eugene Antclis, A.B. 1950, New York University 

Nancy Carolynn Arnold, A.B. 1950, Vassar College 

James Hartford Arthur, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Wilmot Coles Ball, Jr., B.E. 1949, Johns Hopkins University 

Douglas Holmes Barns, B.S. 1950, St. Lawrence L^niversity 

Robert Leonard Beals, A.B. 1950, University of Maine 

Richard Percival Bigelow, A.B. 1951, Brigham Young University 

Sumner Theodore Bohee, B.S. 1950, Franklin and Marshall College Lancaster, Pa. 



Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Teaneck, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Meadville, Pa. 

Ridge wood, N.J. 

Redwood, N.J. 

Skowhegan, Maine 

Provo, LUah 



Harold Thomas Brew, Jr., A.B. 1950, Middlebury College 
John Robert Buchanan, A.B. 1950, Amherst College 
Harry Edwin Cassel, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Hillary Anthony Chollet, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Theodore Av^ery Collier, B.S. 1950, Beloit College 
Richard Warwick Dame, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Harry Warren Daniell, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Joseph Patrick Dineen, B.S. 1950, Fordham L^niversity 
Louis Joseph Dougherty, Jr., A.B. 1950, Yale L'niversity 
Thomas Allen Edwards, A.B. 1950, Wilhams College 
David Eisenberg, A.B. 1950, Cornell L^niversity 
Henry Ralph Eric, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 



New York, N.Y. 

Fair Haven, N.J. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

New Orleans, La. 

New Canaan, Conn. 

Beechhurst, N.Y. 

Millinocket, Maine 

New York, N.Y. 

Rockville Center, N.Y. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Rochester, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 



Seneca Lawrence Erman, B.S. 1949, College of the City of New York New York, N.Y. 

Harrison Hatheway Farley, A.B. 1950, Westminster College Alton, Illinois 

James Charles Ford, B.S. 1950, Iowa State College Boone, Iowa 

Claude Ellis Forkner, Jr., A.B. 1949, Harvard University New York, N.Y. 

Walter Lewis Freedman, A.B. 1950, De Pauw University New York, N.Y. 

Eugene David Furth, A.B. 1950, Wesleyan L'niversity Oak Ridge, Tenn. 
William Henry Gordon, Jr., B.S.E. 1947, University of Michigan; 

M.A. 1949, Columbia University Detroit, Mich. 



102 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 



William Charles Herbert Grimm, Jr., A.B. 1950, Syracuse University 

Myron Roberts Grover, Jr., A.B. 1950, Bowdoin College 

John Fowler Gustafson, A.B. 1950, Bowdoin College 

James Charles Hart, B.S. 1950, University of Arizona 

John Kenneth Herd, B.S. 1950, Rutgers University 

Richard James Homrighausen, A.B. 1950, Princeton University 

Kenneth Andrew Hubel, A.B. 1950, University of Rochester 

Edwin Max Jacobs, A.B. 1950, Reed College 



Ciarfield, N.J. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Laconia, N.H. 

Prescott, Ariz. 

Metuchen, N.J. 

Princeton, N.J. 

Rye, N.Y. 

San Francisco, Calif. 



Albert Warren Janson, B.S. 1950, Franklin and Marshall College 
David Morrison Johnson, Jr., A.B. 1950, Ohio Wesleyan L^nivcrsity 
Norman Wolf Keller, A.B. 1950, Colgate University 
Melvin James King, A.B. 1950, Brown University 
John Joseph Knightly, A.B. 1950, St. Peter's College 
Urick Michael Krasnopolsky, B.S. 1947, University of Oregon 
Richard Kindell Lansche, B.S. 1950, Northwestern University 
David Hillis Law, IV, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Bruce Carl Levy, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Donald Irvan Matern, A.B. 1950, Wesleyan University 
Andrew James McElhinney, Jr., B.S. 1950, Holy Cross College 
Cornelius Irving Meeker, A.B. 1950, Middlebury College 
Charles Donald Meier, A.B. 1950, Duke University 
Thomas Harry Meikle, Jr., A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Edward Stephen Mongan, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
William Edward Morse, B.S. 1950, University of Michigan 
James Wilson Mosley, A.B. 1950, University of Texas 



Westport, Conn. 

Columbus, Ohio 

Tuckahoe, N.Y. 

Pawtucket, R.I. 

Jersey City, N.J. 

ackson Heights, N.Y. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Glendale, Calif. 

Katonah, N.Y. 

Worcester, Mass. 

Pelham, N.Y. 

Plainfield, N.J. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Troy, Pa. 

Richmond Hill, N.Y. 

Kew Gardens, N.Y. 

Austin, Texas 



Philip Robert Nast, A.B. 1950, Washington and Jefferson College 



Butler, Pa. 



Nicholas Macy Nelson, B.S. 1950, Yale University 
Robert Augustine Newton, A.B. 1950, Amherst College 
Marion Ida Neilsen, A.B. 1950, Barnard College 
John Joseph Nolan, B.S. 1950, Holy Cross College 
Paul Fordham Nugent, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Alan Stimson Paterson, B.S. 1950, Yale University 
Robert Chester Patten, B.S. 1950, Davidson College 
John Emerick Peterson, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
George Flory Pritchard, A.B. 1950, Williams College 
Robert Dean Quinn, A.B. 1950, Stanford University 
John Frank Rose, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Michael Sander Rost, A.B. 1950, Colgate University 
Robert Chase Runyon, A.B. 1950, Columbia University 
Saul Leonard Sanders, A.B. 1950, Kenyon College 
Paul Sherlock, B.S. 1950, Queens College 
Robert Ellis Shope, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Robert Perry Singer, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Thornton Maxwell Stearns, A.B. 1950, Yale University 
Nathalie Alice Strahan, A.B. 1950, Wellcsley College 
Ann Patricia Sullivan, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Corbet Harold Turner, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
William Adam Vincent, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Warren Whaley Warbasse, A.B. 1950, Princeton University 
Ralph Chester Williams, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell LIniversity 



Franklin Park, N.J. 

Newton Center, Mass. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Derby, Conn. 

East Hampton, N.Y. 

Rochester, N.Y. 

Miami, Fla. 

Bethesda, Md. 

Bangor, Pa. 

Stanford, Calif. 

Montclair, N.J. 

Orange, N.J. 

Springfield, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Flushing, N.Y. 

Kingston, N.J. 

Middletown, N.Y. 

East Orange, N.J. 

Maplewood, N.J. 

Rhinebeck, N.Y. 

East St. Louis, 111. 

Owego, N.Y. 

East Orange, N.J. 

Chevy Chase, Md . 



FIRST YEAR 

John Vincent Abbott, Jr., A.B. 1950, University of Iowa 
Ronald Alfred Arky, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 



East Paterson, N.J. 
New Brunswick, N.J. 



STUDENTS 



103 



Thane Asch, B.S. 1951, Columbia University 

Robert Coleman Atkins, A.B. 1951, University of Micliigan 

William Sinclair Augerson, A.B. 1949, Bowdoin College 

Stephen McClintock Ayres, A.B. 1951, Gettysburg College 

David Baum, A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 

Edwin Lawrence Bierman, A.B. 1951, Brooklyn College 

Robert Sunderlin Brittain, A.B. 1951, Colgate University 

John Lyman Brown, Jr., Cornell University 

Harry Gray Browne, A.B. 1951, Yale University 

Joseph Anthony Buda, A.B. 1951, Columbia University 

Donald John Cameron, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 

lola Gracey Case, A.B. 1951, Vanderbilt University 

John Paul Clayton, A.B. 1951, Middlebury College 

Kemp Berner Doersch, A.B. 1951, Stanford University 

Richard Irwin Dudley, A.B. 1950, Cornell University; 

M.A. 1951, Emory University 
Maurice Everette Dyer, A.B. 1951, Columbia University 
Robert Richard Engisch, B.S. 1951, Union College 
Howard Marvin Feinstein, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Terence Patrick Fogarty, A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 
Charles Frederick Frey, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 
Sorrell Newton Glover, Cornell University 
John Joseph Griffin, A.B. 1951, St. Peter's College 
Stanley Martin Hanfling, A.B. 1951, Columbia University 
Paul Allen Hansch, A.B. 1948, Pomona College 
Maury Lloyd Hanson, A.B. 1951, Oberlin College 
VViUiam Hillis, A.B. 1951, Wesleyan University 
Charles Hoffman, Jr., A.B. 1951, Yale University 
Milton Hollenberg, A.B. 1951, Brooklyn College 
Charles Edward Hollerman, B.S. 1951, Allegheny College 
Gilbert Dolan Huebner, A.B. 1951, Harvard University 
Reginald Harned Isele, A.B. 1951, Princeton University 
Martin George Jacobs, B.S. 1951, Frankhn and Marshall College 
Kenneth Myron Jensen, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Hiram Kendall, Jr., A.B. 1951, Harvard University 
Kent Gordon Kimball, A.B. 1951, Yale University 
Peter Tamas Knoepfler, B.S. 1950, California Institute of 

Technology; M.A. 1951, Columbia University 
Joseph White Landau, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
John Beucler Lange, B.S. 1951, Franklin and Marshall College 
Richard Charles Lippincott, A.B. 1951, Williams College 
Richard Rowland Lower, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 
Lester Andrus Ludlow, A.B. 1951, Brigham Young University 
Robert Burnett McGandy, A.B. 1951, Harvard University 
Lowell Gilmore McLellan, B.S. 1951, Rutgers University 
Herman Richard Matern, A.B. 1949, Concordia Seminary; 

B.D. 1951, Concordia Seminary 
Gunter Richard Meng, B.S. 1951, Cornell University 
Walter Alexander Murray, Jr., Columbia University 
William Alexander Neill, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 
James Franklin Oates, III, A.B. 1951, Princeton University 
Artemis George Pazianos, A.B. 1951, Wellesley College 
John Henry Per-Lee, A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 
Franklin Hewit Pfeiffenberger, A.B. 1951, Yale University 
John Greenwood Pierik, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 



New York, N.Y. 

Dayton, Ohio 

Ellenville, N.Y. 

Westfield, NJ. 

Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Spencerport, N.Y. 

Palisade, N.J. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Fort Lee, N.J. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Mineola, N.Y. 

Carmichael, Calif. 



New York, N.Y. 

Weston, Mo. 

Elizabeth, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Hillside, N.J. 

Jamaica, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Greenwich, Conn. 

Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Turtle Creek, Pa. 

South Orange, N.J. 

Perth Amboy, N.J. 

Orange, N.J. 

Ithaca, N.Y. 

Westerly, R.I. 

Greenwich, Conn. 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

Teaneck, N.J. 

Guilford, Conn. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Spanish Fork, Utah 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Wood bridge, N.J. 

Worcester, Mass. 

Ithaca, N.Y. 

Knoxville, Tenn. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Lake Forest, 111. 

Manchester, Conn. 

Larchmont, N.Y. 

Alton, 111. 

Providence, R.I. 



104 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 



Guy Downs Plunkett, B.S. 1951, Rutgers University 

James William Preuss, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 

John Vincent Price, B.S. 1951, St. John's College 

Cedric Joseph Priebe, Jr., B.S. 1951, Fordham University 

Brian O'Malley Quinn, B.S. 1951, College of the Holy Cross 

Robert Edward Rentz, B.S. 1951, Trinity College 

Donald Paul Regula, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 

Roland Whan Richmond, A.B. 1951, Bethany College 

Nancy Bernadine Ripley, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 

Ronald Stanley Romig, B.S. 1951, Albright College 

John Ross, Jr., A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 

Leslie Eugene Rudolf, Jr., B.S. 1951, Union College 

Steven Schenker, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 

Miles Harold Sigler, A.B. 1951, University of Rochester 

John Harrison Sipple, Jr., Cornell University 

Herbert Jarvis Sorensen, A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 

Frank George Standaert, A.B. 1950, Harvard University 

Paul Stucki, Jr., A.B. 1951, Hamilton College 

John Bernard Sullivan, B.S. 1951, Manhattan College 

Frederick Gregg Thompson, HI, A.B. 1951, Yale University 

William Richard Thompson, A.B. 1951, University of Maine 

Wolodymyr Tyschenko, Columbia University 

William Webb Van Stone, A.B. 1951, Swarthmore College 

Herbert Getty Vaughan, Jr., B.S. 1951, McGill University 

Frank James Veith, Cornell University 

Frederick Edwin Ventuleth, A.B. 1948, Stanford University 

Jane Harrison Walker, A.B. 1951, Bryn Mawr College 

Willard Travell Weeks, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 

Morton Raymond Weinstein, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 

David Sanborn Wilcox, A.B. 1951, Williams College 

Betsey Sampson Williams, A.B. 1946, Vassar College; 

M.A. 1950, University of California 
Edward Percy Williams, A.B. 1951, Bowdoin College 



Bound Brook, N.J. 

Binghamton, N.Y. 

Belle Harbor, N.Y. 

Jackson Heights, N.Y. 

Rochester, N.Y. 

West Hartford, Conn. 

Westwood, N.J. 

Nutley, N.J. 

Staten Island, N.Y. 

Reading, Penna. 

Bronxville, N.Y. 

Pelham, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

Lakewood, Ohio 

Summit, N.J. 

Paterson, N.J. 

West New York, N.J. 

Long Island City, N.Y. 

St. Joseph, Mo. 

Livermore Falls, Me. 

New York, N.Y. 

Denver, Colo. 

Pelham, N.Y. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Patterson, Calif. 

New York, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Hartford, Conn. 

New York, N.Y. 
Linneus, Me. 



SUMMARY 



Fourth year 82 

Third year 85 

Second year 79 

First year 86 

Total 332 



STUDENTS MATRICULATED IN 
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

1950-1951 

DOCTORS OF PHILOSOPHY 
Daniel A. Alvarez, Jr., A.B. 1943, Camaquey College; B.S. 1943, 
Havana University; M.D. 1950, University of Havana Medical 

College; Ph.D. 1951, Cornell University New York, N.Y. 

Doyle Joslin, A.B. 1917, Colorado College; M.D. 1921, Harvard 

Medical School; Ph.D. 1950, Cornell University New York, N.Y. 

MASTERS OF SCIExNCE 
Frances L. Brewer, B.S. 1947, McGill University; 

M.S. 1950, Cornell University Montreal, Que. 

Juanita P. Garcia, B.S. 1945, University of Kentucky; 

M.S. 1950, Cornell University Denver, Colo. 

Charles E. Kapros, B.S. 1942, Long Island L'niversity; 

M.S. 1951, Cornell University New York, N.Y. 

CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF 
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



York 



Pearl River, N.Y. 



Duncan, Okla. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Shanks Village, N.Y. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Maspeth, N.Y. 

Riverdale, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 



Irving Abrahams, B.S. 1934, College of the City of Nc 
F. David Anderson, A.B. 1948, Westminster College; 

M.S. 1950, Cornell L^niversity 
Edward Berg, A.B. 1948, Brooklyn College 
Samuel Gordon, A.B. 1940, M.S. 1949, New York University 
William H. Horner, M.D. 1947, Western Reserve University 

Medical College 
Edward J. Kuchinskas, B.S. 1949, Queens College 
H. Claire Lawler, A.B. 1941, Barnard College; 

M.S. 1947, New York University 
Bertram A. Lowy, B.S. 1947, College of the City of New York; 

M.S. 1948, University of Illinois 
Rose Lubschez, A.B. 1939, Smith College; 

M.A. 1949, Columbia University Long Island City, N.Y. 

Charles C. Otken, B.S. 1949, The Agricultural and Mechanical 

College of Texas Falfurrias, Tex. 

Jay Roberts, B.S. 1949, Long Island University Brooklyn, N.Y. 

David S. Slautterback, B.S. 1948, M.S. 1949, University of Michigan Fremont, Mich. 
Willard C. Whitehouse, B.S. 1948, Harvard University 
Christian Wingard, M.D. 1945, University of Alabama School 

of Medicine 

CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF 
MASTER OF SCIENCE 
Barbara B. Eshleman, A.B. 1941, Barnard College 
Donald A. Nussbaumer, B.S. 1950, Union College 
Theodore W. Sery, B.S. 1949, Columbia University 



New York, N.Y. 
Wetumpka, Ala. 



Westbury, N.Y. 

Schenectady, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 



NON-CANDIDATE 
Doris G. Holmquist, A.B. 1943, Howard College; 
M.A. 1946, University of North Carolina 



New York, N.Y 



105 



Register of 
The Medical College Stajf 



Adair, Frank E Surgery 80 

Adams, Haiold B Pediatrics 66 

Advocate, Seymour Medicine 56 

Akelaitis, Andrew J Medicine (Neurology) 53 

Allen, Arthur C Pathology 64 

Allen, Edward B Psychiatry 72 

Almy, Thomas P Medicine 53 

Alvarez, Daniel A Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 75 

Anderson, Arthur F Pediatrics 66 

Anderson, David Anatomy 48 

Andors, Leonard Surgery 81 

Antoville, Abraham A Medicine 54 

Applebaum, Jacob Surgery 81 

Artusio, Joseph F., Jr Surgery 80 

Atkinson, Sam C Medicine 54 

Axelrod, David R Physiology 70 

Ayres, William H Surgery 81 

Baez, Silvio Medicine 54 

Baldwin, Horace S Medicine 53 

Balensweig, Irvin Surgery (Orthopedics) 80 

Ball, Thomas L Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Bannister, George Surgery 81 

Baras, Irving Surgery 81 

Barber, Joan K Pediatrics 66 

Barbu, Valer Psychiatry 72 

Barnes, William A Surgery 80 

Barnett, Henry L Pediatrics 66 

Barr, David Surgery 82 

Barr, David P Medicine 53 

Barrett, Martha J Physiology 70 

Baumgartner, Leona Pub. HI. & Prev. Med.; Pediatrics 66, 75 

Beasley, Jean T Pediatrics 66 

Beaven, William E Surgery 82 

Behrman, Stanley J Surgery 81 

Belcher, Anne S Surgery 81 

Beneventi, Francis A Surgery 81 

Bennett, Edward R Psychiatry 72 

Berenberg, Samuel R Pub. HI. & Prev. Med.; Pediatrics 66, 75 

Berkeley, Ruth P Medicine 54 

Berle, Beatrice Medicine; Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 54, 75 

Berliner, Milton L Surgery (Ophthalmology) 80 

Berntsen, Carl A., Jr Medicine 56 

Berry, Charles Anatomy 48 

106 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 107 

Biesele, John J Anatomy 48 

Billo, Otto E Pediatrics 66 

Binger, Carl A Psychiatry 72 

Binkley, George E Surgery 80 

Bird, Robert M Medicine 54 

Bissell, WilHam B Pathology 64 

Bodansky, Oscar Pharmacology 68 

Bonnett, Sara A Psychiatry 72 

Bonsnes, Roy W Biochemistry; Obs,-Gyn 51, 61 

Bowden, Lemuel Surgery 81 

Bowe, John J Surgery 82 

Breen, David S Surgery 82 

Brewer, McHenry S Surgery 82 

Brice, Mitchell Surgery 82 

Brittingham, Thomas E Medicine 56 

Brodman, Keeve Medicine 53 

Brooking, Donald G Military Medicine 86 

Brown, George B Biochemistry 51 

Brown, Veronica C Medicine 54 

Brunschwig, Alexander Surgery 80 

Brush, A. Louise Psychiatry 72 

Buchman, Myron I Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Buckstein, Jacob Medicine 53 

Burchenal, Joseph H Medicine 53 

Burke, Grafton E Medicine 54 

Burke, William H Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Burkhardt, Edward A Medicine 54 

Bulmer, Malcolm W Surgery 82 

Burnett, Harry W Radiology 78 

Burnum, John F Medicine 56 

Butler, Katherine Medicine 53 

Caceres, Eduardo Radiology 78 

Cahan, William G Surgery 81 

Capidaglis, Andre S Radiology 78 

Cardon, Philippe V., Jr Medicine 56 

Carey, Thomas I Surgery 81 

Carpenter, Walter T., Jr Pediatrics 66 

Carr, Henry A Medicine 53 

Carr, Thomas W Medicine 54 

Carter, Anne C Medicine 54 

Gary, William H Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Catlin, Daniel Surgery 81 

Cattell, McKeen Pharmacology 68 

Cawthon, Kathleen S Medicine 56 

Cawthon, William U Medicine 56 

Cecil, Russell L Medicine (Emeritus) 10 

Chaves, Aaron D Pub. HI. & Prev. Med.; Medicine 53, 75 

Child, Charles G., HI Surgery 80 

Choucroun, Nine Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 75 

Chu, Florence Radiology 78 

Cipollaro, Anthony C Medicine (Dermatology) 53 

Clarke, Donald A Pharmacology • 68 

Coats, Edward C Surgery 81 

Cobb, Clement B. P Pediatrics 66 






108 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Cohen, Eugene J Medicine 54- 

Cohen, Merton E Pediatrics 66 

Cole, John T Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Coley, Bradley L Surgery 80 

Conkey, Ogden F Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Conrad, Harold, Jr Medicine 56 

Console, Arthur D Surgery (Neurosurgery) 80 

Constantine, Elizabeth Surgery 81 

Conte, Alexander Surgery 81 

Conway, Herbert Surgery 80 

Cooper, Howard N Psychiatry 73 

Cooper, William A Surgery 80 

Cormia, Frank E Medicine (Dermatology) 53 

Cornell, Carlton M Surgery 81 

Cornell, George N Surgery 82 

Cornell, Nelson W Surgery 80 

Cotton, John M Psychiatry 72 

Craig, Robert L Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Crandell, Daniel L Surgery 82 

Graver, Lloyd F Medicine 53 

Crawford, David B Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Crissey, Eleanor Psychiatry 72 

Cromwell, Henry A Medicine 54- 

Cummins, Francis M Radiology 78 

Daniel, William W Surgery 81 

Daniels, Helen E Psychiatry 72 

Dann, Margaret Pediatrics 66 

Dargeon, Harold W. K Pediatrics 66 

Davidson, Murray Pediatrics 67 

Davies, Frederick M Surgery 82 

Davis, Bernard D Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 75 

Davis, Daniel W Surgery 82 

Davis, Jeflf Medicine 54 

Day, Emerson Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 75 

Deans, Robert D Surgery 81 

Deddish, Michael R Surgery 80 

de Gara, Paul F Pathology; Pediatrics 64, 66 

DeHaven, Hugh R Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 75 

Deitrick, John E Medicine 53 

Delany, Forbes Radiology 78 

Denker, Peter G Medicine (Neurology) 53 

Denmark, Stuart M Surgery 82 

Dennen, Edward H Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Despert, J. Louise Psychiatry 72 

De Winter, Christian J Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Diamond, Henry D Medicine 54 

Diamond, Monroe T Medicine 54 

Dickerson, Roy H Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Diethelm, Oskar Psychiatry "72 

Dingwall, James A., HI Surgery 80 

Doig, Ronald K Medicine 56 

Dotter, Charles T Medicine; Radiology 54, 78 

Doucett, James A., Jr Pediatrics 67 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 109 

Dougherty, John W Medicine 54 

Douglas, R. Gordon Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Drapeau, Blaise Surgery 82 

Draper, John W Surgery (Urology) 80 

Drew, J. Edwin Surgery 81 

DuBois, Eugene F Physiology (Emeritus) 10 

DuBois, Robert O Pediatrics 66 

Dudley, Guilford S Surgery 80 

Duley, Wade Surgery 81 

Dunbar, Howard S Surgery 81 

Dunlap, Edward A Surgery (Ophthalmology) 80 

Dunn, William H Psychiatry 72 

Dunning, Henry S Medicine (Neurology) 53 

du Vigneaud, Vincent Biochemistry 51 

Dworetzky, Murray Medicine 56 

Dyer, Charles F Surgery 82 

Eckardt, Robert E Medicine 54 

Eckel, John H Surgery 80 

Eder, Howard A Medicine 53 

Edwards, Dayton J Physiology (Emeritus); Sec'y of Faculty 8, 10 

Edwards, Herbert R Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 75 

Egan, George F Surgery 80 

Eggleston, Gary Medicine 53 

Eichenwald, Heinz F Pediatrics 67 

Eisenbud, Mark Medicine 56 

Eliasberg, Helene Pediatrics 66 

Ellis, John T Pathology; Surgery 64, 80 

Elmendorf, Dumont F., Jr Medicine 56 

Elser, William J Appl. Path. & Bact. (Emeritus) 10 

Emmel, Robert C Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Epstein, Nathan Pediatrics 66 

Erdman, Albert J., Jr Medicine 55 

Espinosa, Armando M Surgery 82 

Evans, John A Radiology 78 

Falk, Emil A Medicine 55 

Parber, Milton Psychiatry 72 

Farmer, Lawrence Medicine 55 

Farrell, Frank W Surgery 81 

Farrow, Joseph H Surgery 80 

Feder, Aaron E Medicine 53 

Fenger, John R Surgery 83 

Ferguson, Frank C Pharmacology 68 

Fiedler, George A Surgery (Urology) 80 

Fink, Austin I Surgery . 81 

Finn, William F Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Fleetwood, M. Freile Psychiatry 72 

Fleischmann, Edgar P Surgery 81 

Focht, Elizabeth F Radiology 78 

Foley, William T Medicine 54 

Foot, N. Chandler Surgical Pathology (Emeritus) 10 

Foote, Frank W., Jr Pathology 64 

Foote, Franklin M Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 75 

Forkner, Claude E Medicine 53 



no THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Fraad, Lewis M Pediatrics 66 

Francis, Alfred M Surgery 81 

Franklin, John E Pediatrics 66 

Eraser, Alan W Psychiatry 72 

Frazell, Edgar L Surgery 80 

Free, Edward A Surgery 83 

Freund, Jules Pathology 64 

Freyberg, Richard H Medicine 53 

Friess, Constance Medicine 54 

Furey, J. George Surgery 83 

Gabel, Milton Surgery 81 

Garb, Solomon Pharmacology 68 

Garrick, Thomas J Surgery 81 

Gaulden, Edmond C Medicine 56 

Cause, Ralph W Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Cenghof, Dorothy S Biochemistry 51 

Genvert, Harold Surgery 80 

Geohegan, William A Anatomy 48 

Gepfert, J. Randolph Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Gerson, Martin J Psychiatry 72 

Gerster, John C. A , Surgery 80 

Gibbons, John Martin Medicine 55 

Gilder, Helena Biochemistry; Surgery 51, 81 

Gill, James P Medicine 56 

Giorgi, Elsie A Medicine 56 

Given, William P Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Glassman, Oscar Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Glenn, Frank Surgery 80 

Glynn, Martin J Pediatrics 66 

Goff, Bryon H Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Gold, Harry Pharmacology 68 

Goldberg, Henry P Pediatrics 66 

Goldstein, Oscar Medicine 55 

Goodell, Helen Medicine 56 

Goodridge, Malcolm Medicine (Emeritus) 10 

Goodwin, Laurance D Biochemistry 51 

Goodyear, Stephen Psychiatry 72 

Gordon, Dan M Surgery (Ophthalmology) 81 

Gordon, Samuel Biochemistry 51 

Gore, Arthur L Surgery 81 

Grace, William J Medicine 54 

Greaves, Donald C Psychiatry 73 

Greeley, Arthur V Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Green, James L Surgery 81 

Greenacre, Phyllis Psychiatry 72 

Greenberg, Sidney Medicine 54 

Greiner, Theodore H Pharmacology 68 

Guenard, Eugene J Surgery 82 

Guild, Warren R Medicine 56 

Guion, Connie M Medicine (Emeritus) 10 

Guthrie, Keith O., Jr Medicine 55 

Hadley, Susan J Medicine 55 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 111 

Hagaman, Wilbur D., Jr Anatomy 48 

Hale, James O Surgery 82 

Halsey, Hugh Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Hamilton, Francis J Psychiatry 72 

Hanlon, Lawrence W Assistant Dean; Anatomy 8, 48 

Hansson, Kristian G Surgery (Physiotherapy) 80 

Haralambie, James Q Pediatrics 66 

Hardy, James D Physiology 70 

Harrar, James A Obstetrics & Gynecology (Emeritus) 10 

Harrington, Helen Pediatrics 66 

Harris, Richard L Psychiatry 72 

Harrison, Charles S Surgery 83 

Harrison, James S Surgery 82 

Hauser, Edwin T Medicine 53 

Hauser, Louis A Medicine 55 

Hausman, Louis Medicine (Neurology) 53 

Havel, Richard J Medicine 56 

Hawkins, W. Hall Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Hays, Daniel M Surgery 82 

Hebard, George W Medicine 55 

Heffner, Reid R Medicine 55 

Hehre, Edward J Bacteriology & Immunology 50 

Heimoff, Leonard L Medicine 55 

Heinzen, Bruce Surgery 82 

Helper, Alex N Pathology 64 

Helper, Helen N Pediatrics 66 

Helpern, Herman G Medicine " 55 

Helpern, Milton Medicine; Pathology 54, 64 

Henry, George W Psychiatry 72 

Hetzel, Basil S Medicine 56 

Hiatt, Howard H Medicine 56 

Higinbotham, Norman L Surgery 81 

Hinkle, Lawrence E., Jr Medicine 54 

Hinsey, Joseph C Dean; Anatomy 8, 48 

Hobson, Lawrence B Medicine 55 

Hollander, Vincent P Medicine 55 

Holman, Cranston W Surgery 80 

Holman, James M Surgery 82 

Holswade, George R Surgery 82 

Holt, Evelyn Medicine 55 

Homrich, Leslie A Medicine 55 

Hood, Claude I Pathology 64 

Hooker, Russell H Surgery 82 

Hopper, Mary Ellen Medicine 56 

Houde, Raymond W Medicine 55 

Howe, Suzanne A. L Surgery 82 

Huebner, Robert D Medicine 56 

Humphreys, Gustavus A Surgery (Urology) 81 

Hunt, Frederick C Pediatrics 66 

Hutcheson, James B Pathology 64 

Hynes, Frank J Surgery 82 

Isenhour, Albert Surgery 83 

Jacobson, Leif Y Medicine 55 



112 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Jameison, Gerald R Psychiatry 72 

Jaspin, George Radiology 78 

Javert, Carl T Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Jensen, D. Rees Surgery 81 

Johnson, Donald G Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Johnson, Robert A Surgery 82 

Johnson, Scott Medicine 55 

Joslin, Doyle Surgery 81 

Joyner, Edmund N., Ill Pediatrics 66 

Kahn, Morton C Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 75 

Kalfayan, Bernard Pathology 64 

Kammerer, William H Medicine 55 

Kane, Ernest G Medicine 56 

Kane, Francis D Psychiatry 72 

Kantor, Herbert G Radiology 78 

Kany, Alfred W Radiology 78 

Kaplan, Lawrence I Medicine 55 

Karl, Richard Surgery 83 

Karnofsky, David A Medicine 54 

Karzon, David T Pediatrics 67 

Kauer, George L., Jr Medicine 54 

Kauer, Joseph T Surgery 82 

Keefer, Edward B. C Surgery 82 

Kelley, Samuel F Surgery (Otolaryngology) 81 

Kellner, Aaron Pathology 64 

Kelly, James T. . . . *. Surgery 82 

Kemp, Walter W Psychiatry 73 

Kennedy, Foster Medicine (Neurology) 53 

Kensler, Charles J Pharmacology 68 

Kent, Ann P Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 75 

Kern, Fred, Jr Medicine; Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 55, 75 

Kerns, Thomas C, Jr Surgery 83 

Keyes, Gale H Medicine 57 

Kidd, John G Pathology 64 

Kinney, John M Biochemistry 51 

Kirkham, Frederic T Medicine 56 

Kirkland, Henry B Medicine 55 

Klebanoff, Seymour G Psychiatry 72 

Klumpp, Margaret Medicine 54 

Knehr, Charles A Psychiatry 72 

Knight, J. Vernon Medicine 55 

Koch, Henry J., Jr Medicine 55 

Koenig, Hedwig Pediatrics 66 

Kohl, Richard N Psychiatry 72 

Koprowska, Irena Anatomy 48 

Korsch, Barbara M Pediatrics 66 

Koteen, Herbert Medicine 55 

Koteen, Phyllis H Pediatrics 66 

Kramer, Elmer E Obstetrics &. Gynecology 61 

Kramer, Milton L Medicine 54 

Kuchinskas, Edward J Biochemistry 51 

Kwit, Nathaniel T Pharmacology 68 

La Due, John S Medicine 54 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 113 

Lake, Michael Medicine 55 

LaMar, Norvelle C Psychiatry 72 

Lampe, Ernest W Anatomy; Surgery 48, 81 

Landesman, Robert Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Landsdovvn, Frances S Medicine 55 

Langner, Helen D Psychiatry 72 

Lapham, Roger F Medicine 55 

LaSorte, Antonio F Surgery 83 

Lau, Michael Surgery 82 

Lau, Roy E Surgery 83 

Laupus, William E Pediatrics 66 

Lauson, Henry D Pediatrics; Physiology 66, 70 

Lawton, Richard W Physiology 70 

Leder, Harold L Medicine 55 

Lee, Richard E Medicine 55 

Leighton, Alexander Hamilton . . Psychiatry 72 

Lemke, Dorothea Medicine 55 

L'Esperance, Elise S Pub. HI. & Prev. Med. (Emeritus) 10 

Levine, Leon I Medicine 54 

Levine, Milton I Pediatrics 66 

Levine, Samuel Z Pediatrics 66 

Lewis, George M Medicine (Dermatology) 53 

Ley, Allyn B Medicine 55 

Lichtman, S. S Medicine 54 

Lieberman, Jerrold S Medicine 57 

Liebolt, Frederick L Surgery (Orthopedics) 80 

Lincoln, Asa L Medicine 53 

Lincoln, Jim F Surgery 83 

Lintz, Robert M Medicine 55 

Loebel, Robert O Medicine 55 

Longabaugh, Edward E Surgery 83 

Loveless, Mary E. H Medicine (Allergy) 53 

Luckey, E. Hugh Medicine 54 

Lukas, Daniel S Medicine 55 

MacFee, William F Surgery 80 

MacLeod, John Anatomy; Physiology 48, 70 

McAuliffe, Gervais W Surgery (Otolaryngology) 80 

McCandlish, Howard S Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

McClenahan, John L Radiology 78 

McClure, Roy D Surgery 83 

McCombs, A. Parks Medicine 55 

McCormack, Richard R Medicine 55 

McCune, Robert M Medicine 56 

McDermott, Walsh Medicine 53 

McDevitt, Ellen Medicine 56 

McDowell, Fletcher Medicine 57 

McElwee, Ross S Surgery 82 

McGimsey, Robert F., Jr Medicine 56 

McGovern, Robert G Pediatrics 66 

McGowan, Frank J Surgery 81 

McGrath, John F Psychiatry 73 

Mcllveen, Mario N Pediatrics 66 

McLane, Charles M Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

McLarn, William D Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 



114 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

McLean, John M Surgery (Ophthalmology) 80 

McLellan, Allister M Surgery (Urology) 80 

McLellan, Frederick C Surgery (Urology) 81 

McNamara, Helen Pediatrics 67 

McNeer, Gordon Surgery 81 

Maisel, Bernard Surgery 82 

Mannix, Henry, Jr Surgery 83 

Marbury, Benjamin E Surgery 82 

Marchand, John F Medicine 55 

Marshall, Florence N Pediatrics 67 

Marshall, Victor F Surgery (Urology) 80 

Martin, Hayes Surgery 80 

Martin, Kirby Medicine 55 

Martin, Lester W Surgery 83 

Mattar, Guilherme Pediatrics 66 

Maxwell, Morton H Medicine 57 

Mayers, Albert N Psychiatry 72 

Mazur, Abraham Medicine 54 

Meacham, Charles T Surgery 82 

Mehler, Leopold Surgery 82 

Melchionna, Robert H Medicine 55 

Melville, Donald B Biochemistry 51 

Mendelson, Curtis L Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Mercer, Mary E Pediatrics; Psychiatry 66, 72 

Merrill, James A Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Milhorat, Ade T Medicine; Psychiatry 53, 72 

Miller, Charles J Surgery 82 

Miller, Raymond E Medicine 55 

Milman, Anne Psychiatry 72 

Mindlin, Rowland Pediatrics 66 

Miscall, Laurence Surgery 81 

Mitchell, Frederick M Surgery 83 

Modell, Walter Pharmacology 68 

Moench, L. Mary Medicine 55 

Molander, David W Medicine 57 

Money, William L Medicine 54 

Moore, James A Surgery (Otolaryngology) 80 

Moore, Oliver S Surgery 82 

Moore, S. W Surgery 80 

Morgenthau, Joan E Pediatrics 66 

Morrill, Charles V Anatomy 48 

Munroe, William G. C Medicine 57 

Murphy, Willis A Medicine 55 

Muschenheim, Carl Medicine 53 

Nathanson, Joseph N Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Negrin, Juan Surgery 82 

Neill, James M Bacteriology & Immunology 50 

Nestler, Warren B Medicine 56 

Nestor, John O Medicine 56 

Neumann, Charles P Psychiatry 73 

New, Elizabeth V Pediatrics 67 

Nickel, William F., Jr Surgery 80 

Nickerson, Kenneth G Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Nickson, James J Radiology 78 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 115 

Noback, Richardson K Medicine 55 

Norton, Edward W. D Surgery 83 

Oberholzer, Emil Psychiatry 72 

Ogilvie, John B Surgery 82 

Olcott, Charles T Pathology 64 

Oljenick, Ignaz W Medicine (Neurology) 57 

Ollstein, Philip Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 75 

O'Neill, Earl A Surgery 82 

Opie, Eugene L Pathology (Emeritus) 10 

Oppel, Theodore W Medicine 53 

O'Regan, Charles H Pediatrics 66 

O'Suilivan, Ward D Surgery 81 

Overman, Ralph S Medicine 54 

Pack, George T Surgery 80 

Palmer, Arthur Surgery (Otolaryngology) 80 

Palmer, Douglass Medicine 54 

Papanicolaou, George Anatomy (Emeritus) 10 

Paquin, Albert J Surgery 83 

Pardee, Harold E. B Medicine 53 

Parsons, Herbert Surgery 81 

Pa^tore, John B Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Patterson, Marjorie B Medicine 55 

Patterson, Russel H Surgery 80 

Payne, Mary Ann Medicine 55 

Peacock, Wendell C Radiology 78 

Pearce, John M Pathology; Surgery 64, 80 

Pearson, Olaf H Medicine 54 

Pearson, T. Arthur Radiology 78 

Perrone, Francis S Medicine 57 

Person, E. Cooper, Jr Surgery 80 

Peters, Frank H Medicine 54 

Philips, Frederick S Pharmacology 68 

PhilUps, Ralph F Radiology 78 

Pierce, John G Biochemistry 51 

Pierce, Virginia K Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Pitts, Robert F Physiology 70 

Plummer, Norman Medicine 54 

Pool, John L Surgery 81 

Pritchett, R. A. Rees Medicine 57 

Prout, Curtis T Psychiatry 72 

Pullman, Robert A. W Surgery 83 

Rachele, Julian R Biochemistry 51 

Rackow, Leon L Psychiatry 72 

Rail, Joseph E Medicine 54 

Randall, Henry T Surgery 80 

Rao, D. L. N. Murti Psychiatry 73 

Rawson, Rulon W Medicine 53 

Ray, Bronson S Surgery 80 

Reader, George G Medicine; Pharmacology 54, 68 

Redo, S. Frank Surgery 83 

Reilly, Joseph F Pharmacology 68 



116 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Rennie, Thomas A. C Psychiatry 72 

Ressler, Charles H Medicine 55 

Ressler, Charlotte Biochemistry 51 

ReznikolT, Paul Medicine 53 

Rhoads, Cornelius P Pathology 64 

Richardson, Eric C Surgery 82 

Richardson, Henry B Medicine 53 

Richter, Goetz W Pathology 64 

Richter, Peter Medicine 57 

Riekert, Herbert J Surgery (Orthopedics) 81 

Rigney, Thomas G Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 75 

Riker, Walter F., Jr Pharmacology 68 

Robbins, Guy F Surgery 82 

Robbins, Jacob Medicine 55 

Robbins, William C Medicine 57 

Roberts, Kathleen Physiology 70 

Robertson, James G Surgery 82 

Robertson, Theodore Pathology 64 

Robinson, Alan S Medicine 57 

Rockwell, Fred V Psychiatry 72 

Rogers, David E Medicine 55 

Rogoff, Julius L Medicine 55 

Romeo, Bruno J Medicine 55 

Rosensohn, Meyer Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Rothbard, Sidney Medicine 53 

Rubin, Albert L Medicine 57 

5abbatino, Joseph F Medicine 55 

Sackett, Nelson B Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Samuels, Bernard R Surgery (Ophthalmology) (Emeritus) 10 

5canlan, Theresa Medicine 55 

Scheinesson, George P Pathology 64 

Schillinger, Arnold A Psychiatry 72 

Schloss, Oscar M Pediatrics (Emeritus) 10 

Schmidlapp, Carl J Surgery 82 

Schmidt, John G Surgery (Orthopedics) 81 

Schnap, Emil H Radiology 78 

5chottstaedt, William W Medicine 56 

Schulman, Irving Pediatrics 66 

Schwartz, Hans J Medicine (Dermatology) (Emeritus) 10 

Schwartz, Irving Radiology 78 

Selby, Henry M Radiology 78 

Scofield, S. Frank Surgery 83 

Seybolt, John F Anatomy 48 

Sheard, Charles Medicine 55 

Shepard, Edward M Medicine 56 

Sheppard, Erwin Medicine 54 

•Sherfey, Mary J Psychiatry 72 

Sherman, Robert S Radiology 78 

Sherwin, Albert C Psychiatry 72 

Shorr, Ephraim Medicine 53 

Shultz, Selma M Medicine 56 

Simmons, Leo W Meaicine 53 

Simon, Eugene P Medicine 56 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 117 

Simons, Donald J Medicine; Psychiatry 53, 72 

Smedley, Lois M Pediatrics 66 

Smillie, Wilson G Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 75 

Smith, Carl H Pediatrics 66 

Smith, Erwin F Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Smith, Frank R Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Smith, J. James Medicine 54 

Smith, Martha L Pediatrics 66 

Snodgrass, John J Radiology 7& 

Snyder, Charles T Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Snyder, Stuart S Surgery (Ophthalmology) 81 

Sonkin, Lawrence S Medicine 57 

Sonenberg, Martin Medicine 56 

Southam, Chester Medicine 56 

Speer, David S Surgery 82 

Spellman, Robert M Surgery 8S 

Spielman, Aaron D Medicine 56 

Stanton, Carey Pathology 64 

Stark, Richard B Surgery 82 

Stearns, Maus W Surgery 82 

Steinberg, Israel Medicine; Radiology 54, 78- 

Stevens, Alexander R Surgery (Urology) (Emeritus) 10 

Stevenson, Carl R Medicine 56 

Stevenson, Lewis D Pathology; Medicine (Neurology) 53, 64 

Stewart, Fred W Pathology; Surgery 64, 80 

Stewart, Harold J Medicine 53- 

Stickney, John W Medicine 56 

Stillerman, Maxwell Pediatrics 66 

Stimson, Philip M Pediatrics 66 

Stoll, Alice M Physiology 70 

Straub, Leonard R Psychiatry 72 

Struve, John F Surgery 82 

Stubenbord, William D Medicine 56 

Stubington, David Pathology 64 

Sugg, John Y Bacteriology & Immunology 50 

Sullivan, Joseph D Psychiatry 72 

Sutherland, Arthur M Medicine 54 

Sutter, James T Medicine 56 

Sutton, John E Surgery 81 

Sweeney, Lawrence Medicine 57 

Sweeney, William J Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Sweet, Joshua E Experimental Surgery (Emeritus) 10 

Swift, Katherine W Medicine 56 

Syz, Hans Psychiatry 7S 

Tagnon, Henry J Medicine 53 

Tandon, Harcharan D Pathology 64 

Taussky, Hertha H Medicine 56 

Taylor, Sterling Biochemistry 51 

Temple, Harold L Radiology 78 

Thompson, David B Physiology 70 

Thorbjarnarson, Bjorn Surgery 83 

Tifft, J. George Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Timpanelli, Alphonse E Medicine 54 



118 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 



Tolstoi, Edward Medicine 

Tompsett, Ralph R Medicine 

Torda, Clara Medicine 

Torre, Douglas P Medicine 

Toscani, Vincent A Medicine 

Travell, Janet Pharmacology . . . . 

Travis, John H Psychiatry 

Treves, Norman Surgery 

Tulin, Maurice Medicine 

Tulloch, John A Medicine 

Tunis, M. Martin Medicine 

Tweddel, George Surgery 

Twinem, Francis P Surgery (Urology) 

Tw^iss, J. Russell Medicine 

Tyhurst, James S Psychiatry 

Tyhurst, Libuse J Psychiatry 

Tyndall, Marion Medicine 



53 
54 
54 
56 
56 
68 
72 
81 
56 
56 
56 
83 
81 
56 
72 
73 
56 



Valentine, E. Henry Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Valergakis, Frederick E. G Medicine 56 

Verly, Walter G. L Biochemistry 51 

Vogel, Stephen Pathology; Surgery 64, 81 

Voorhees, William D Psychiatry 73 



Wade, Preston A Surgery . . 

Wadsworth, Morton Psychiatry 

Wall, James H Psychiatry 

Wallace, John M Medicine 

Wantz, George E., Jr Surgery . . 

Warner, Nathaniel Psychiatry 

Watson, Robert F Medicine . 

Watson, William L Surgery . . 



80 

73 

72 

57 

83 

73 

53 

81 

Weber, Frederick C, Jr Medicine 56 

Webster, Bruce P Medicine 53 

Weeden, Willis M Surgery; Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 75, 82 



Weeks, Donald L 

Weiman, Clinton G 

Weinbaum, Jerome A 

Weintraub, Sydney 

Welch, Livingston 

Welsch, Exie Elizabeth .... 

Welsh, George W., Ill 

Werner, Erwin A Medicine . 

Wertz, Frederick J Psychiatry 



Surgery 83 

Medicine 57 

Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

Radiology 78 

Psychiatry 72 

Psychiatry 72 

Medicine 57 

56 

73 



West, Charles D Medicine 56 

West, John P Surgery 81 

West, Louis J Psychiatry 73 

Wetzig, Paul C Surgery 83 

Weymuller, Louis E Pediatrics 66 

Wheatley, Marjorie A Pediatrics 66 

Whedon, G. Donald Medicine 54 

Wheeler, Charles H Medicine 54 

White, Paul L Obstetrics & Gynecology 61 

White, Stephen Radiology 78 

Whitmore, Willet F., Jr Surgery (Urology) 81 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 119 

Wilder, Joseph R Surgery 83 

Williams, Byard Medicine 54 

Wilson, May G Pediatrics 66 

Wingebach, Wilfred D Surgery 82 

Wolbach, Robert A Physiology 70 

Wolf, George A., Jr Medicine 54 

Wolf, Stewart G., Jr Medicine 53 

Wolff, Harold G Medicine (Neurology); Psychiatry 53, 72 

Wolff, William I Surgery 82 

Wood, Francis J. Y Medicine 56 

Woodward, Walter D Psychiatry; Pub. HI. & Prev. Med 72, 75 

Wright, Harold S Psychiatry 73 

Wright, Irving S Medicine 53 

Wright, Mary Elizabeth Biochemistry 51 

Yeager, Robert L Medicine (Tuberculosis) 57 

Zins, Eugene Y Medicine 57 

Zipser, Stanley S Pediatrics 66 

Zucker, Seymour Medicine 56 

Zweifach, Benjamin W Medicine 54 

SUMMARY OF MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 

Full Professors 37 

Associate Professors 88 

Assistant Professors 161 

Instructors, Assistants, etc 396 

Total 682 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL 

The issues of this publication are designed to give prospec-l 
tive students and other persons information about C -^ 
University, No charge is made for them. 

The prospective student should have a copy of General In- 
form atio?i and a copy of one or more of the following An- 
nouncements ; 

Graduate School, Medical College, Cornell University-Nevj 
York Hospital School of Nursing, Law School, College of Arts 
and Sciences, College of Architecture, College of Engineering, 
School of Business and Public Administration, New York State 
College of Agriculture, Two-Year and One-Year Courses in 
Agriculture, Farm Study Courses, New York State School of 
Industrial and Labor Relations, New York State ColU"/' of 
Home Economics, School of Hotel Administration, Nc: 
State Veterinary College, School of Nutrition, School of Ec 
cation. Independent Departments, Sumrr>pr ^c^non, Annu r 
Report of the President. 

Also available are a Directory of Staff (25 cents, po 
a Directory of Students (35 cents, postpaid), and A Book 
Pictures (50 cents, postpaid). 

Correspondence regarding these publications should be l «j 
dressed to 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICLU. PUBLICATION 
EDMUND EZRA DAY HALL, ITHACA, NEW YORK. 






CORNELL UNIVERSITY 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



AUGUST 12, 1952 



Medical College 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOR 1952-53 SESSIONS 





CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



Published by Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, every two 
weeks throughout the year. Volume 44. August 12, 1952. Num- 
ber 4. Entered as second-class matter. December 14, 1916, at tlie 
post office at Itiiaca, New Yor t of August 2^ 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

Ithaca, New York 

lAedical College 

1300 York Avenue, New York 21, N.Y. 

1952-53 



Contents 



Calendar 

The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center 

The College Council and Advisory Committee 
Officers of Administration and Executive Faculty 

Standing Committees 

Faculty 

General Statement 

Requirements for Admission and Graduation 
General Information: 

Fees, Prizes, Scholarships, Loans 

Cornell University Medical College Alumni Association, Inc 
Educational Policies and Plan of Instruction 
Description of Courses 

Anatomy 

Bacteriology and Immunology 

Biochemistry 

Medicine 

Medical Comprehensive Care 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Pathology 

Pediatrics 

Pharmacology 

Physiology and Biophysics 

Psychiatry 

Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

Radiology .... 

Surgery 

Military Medicine . 
Special Students 
Table of Required Hours 
Sloan-Kettering Division and Faculty 
Internship Appointments, Class of 1952 
Register of Students, 1952-53 
Register of the Medical College and Sloan-Kettering Staffs 



2-3 
5 
5 
7 
8 
9 
25 
30 

37 
45 
46 
48 
48 
50 
51 
53 
60 
62 
65 
67 
69 
71 
73 
76 
79 
81 
87 
89 
90 
95 
102 
104 
111 



1952 


1953 


July 








January 




July 


S M T \V T F 


s 


s 


M 


T \V T F s 


s 


M T \V T F S 


12 3 4 


5 






1 2 3 




12 3 4 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 


4 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


19 


11 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


27 28 29 30 31 




25 


26 


27 28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


August 








February 




August 


S M T W T F 


s 


s 


M 


T \V T F s 


s 


M T \V T F S 


1 


2 


1 


2 


3 4 5 6 7 




1 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 


8 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 


9 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


16 


15 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 


22 


23 


24 25 26 27 28 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 








23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 


31 










30 31 


September 








March 




September 


S M T W T F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T F s 


s 


M T \V T F s 


12 3 4 5 


6 


1 


2 


3 4 5 6 7 




12 3 4 5 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 


8 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 


15 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 


92 


23 


24 25 26 27 28 


20 


21 2"^ ">?> 24 25 26 


28 29 30 




29 


30 


31 


27 


28 29 30 


October 








April 




October 


S M T W T F 


s 


s 


M 


T \V T F s 


s 


M T \V T F s 


1 2 3 


4 






12 3 4 




1 2 3 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 


5 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 


12 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


26 27 28 29 30 31 




26 


27 


28 29 30 


25 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


November 








May 




November 


S M T W T F 


s 


s 


M 


T \V T F S 


s 


M T \V T F s 




1 






1 2 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 


2 3 4 5 6 7 


8 


3 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 


8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 


9 10 11 12 13 14 


15 


10 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


22 


17 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


24 


25 


26 27 28 29 30 


29 


30 


30 




31 










December 








June 




December 


S M T W T F 


s 


s 


M 


T \V T F s 


s 


M T \V T F s 


12 3 4 5 


6 




1 


2 3 4 5 6 




12 3 4 5 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 


7 


8 


9 10 11 12 13 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 


14 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 


21 


99 


23 24 25 26 27 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


28 29 30 31 




28 


29 


30 


27 


28 29 30 31 



Calendar 



1952 
June 23 

July 4-5 
August 16 
August 30- 

Sept. 1 
Sept. 8-9 
Sept. 8-10 
Sept. 10 
Sept. 11 

Oct. 10 
Oct. 13 
Nov. 4 
Nov. 27 
Nov. 28-29 
Nov. 29 
Dec. 1 
Dec. 3 
Dec. 20 

1953 
Jan. 5 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 23 
March 3-4 
March 4 
March 5-11 
March 12 
April 8 
May 28 
May 30 
June 1-4 
June 10 



Registration and beginning of instruction (first division) 

for fourth year students. 
Independence Day — holiday. 
Second division begins for fourth year students. 

Labor Day — holiday. 

Examinations for conditioned students. 

Registration for first, second, and third year classes.* 

Opening exercises, 3:30 p.m. 

Instruction begins for first, second, and third year classes, 

9 a.m. 
Third division begins for fourth year students. 
Columbus Day — holiday. 
Election Day — holiday. 
Thanksgiving Day — holiday. 
Examinations for second year students. 
Fall term ends, 1 p.m. 
\Vinter term begins, 9 a.m. 

Fourth division begins for fourth year students. 
Christmas recess begins, 1 p.m. 



Christmas recess ends, 9 a.m. 

Fifth division begins for fourth year students. 

Lincoln's Birthday — holiday. 

Washington's Birthday — holiday. 

Examinations for first year students. 

Winter term ends, 1 p.m. 

Spring recess. 

Spring term begins, 9 a.m. 

Sixth division begins for fourth year students. 

Instruction ends for all classes, 5 p.m. 

Memorial Day — holiday. 

Final examinations. 

Commencement, 2:30 p.m. 



* All students except fourth year students must register in person at the Administration Office on 
or before September 12. No student will be admitted after registration day without special permission. 
Upon registration, all fees must be paid at the Business Office. For fourth year students the first in- 
stallment of tuition is payable on or before September 12. 



The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center 



THE CENTER was formed by an agreement between the Society of the 
New York Hospital and Cornell University in order to associate organi- 
cally the hospital and the medical college and to effect a complete co- 
ordination of the medical, educational, and scientific activities of the two 
institutions. 

The Center is operated under the supervision of a Joint Administrative 
Board, composed of three governors of the Society of the New York 
Hospital, three representatives of the Board of Trustees of Cornell Uni- 
versity, and one other member elected by the appointed members. 

The Joint Administrative Board is composed of the following members : 

Stanhope Bayne-Jones, President 
Deane W. Malott Hamilton Hadley 

Neal D. Becker Henry S. Sturgis 

Arthur H. Dean John Hay Whitney 

John W. Davis 

FORM FOR BEQUESTS 

The Society of the New York Hospital is associated with the Cornell 
University Medical College, which is one of the colleges of Cornell Uni- 
versity, under the title of "The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center." 

Gifts or bequests should be made either to the Hospital or to the Uni- 
versity, but not to the above-named Association. 

If for the Hospital, the language may be: "I give and bequeath to the 
Society of the New York Hospital, the sum of $ ." 

If for the College, the language may be: "I give and bequeath to Cor- 
nell University the sum of $ for use in connection 

with its Medical College in New York City." If it is desired that a gift 
shall be used in whole or in part for any specific purpose in connection 
with the College, such use may be specified. 

THE COLLEGE COUNCIL 

For the purpose of discharging its duties to the Memorial Hospital 
under the Douglas Deeds of Trust, the Board of Trustees is constituted as 
the Council of the Cornell University Medical College in New York City. 

5 



6 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

THE COLLEGE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

There is also established a Medical College Advisory Committee, which 
shall consist of eleven members: The President of the University, who 
shall be Chairman; the President of the Joint Administrative Board; four 
trustees to be elected by the Board of Trustees, one of whom shall be 
elected each year for the term of four years; the Dean of the Medical 
College; two members of the Faculty of the Medical College, to be elect- 
ed by such Faculty, one each year for the term of two years; two alumni 
of the Medical College, one to be appointed by the Medical College Al- 
umni Association and the other by the Board of Trustees, each for a term 
of one year. 

The Committee at present consists of the following members: 

Deane W. Malott, President of the University, Chairman, ex officio 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Dean of the Medical College, ex officio 

S. Bayne- Jones, President of the Joint Administrative Board, ex officio 

Dorothy McS. Arnold 

of the Board 

Jacob G. Schurman, Jr. (of Trustees 

William B. Cornell 

R. Gordon Douglas ^ ) . , ^ , 

Robert F. Pitts ^ *' ^^^"^'^ 



Paul Reznikoff 
Nelson W. Cornell 

Edw^ard K. Taylor, Secretary 



of the Alumni 



Officers of Administration 



Deane W. Malott, President of the University 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Dean of the Medical College 

Lawrence W. Hanlon, Assistant Dean 

Dayton J. Edwards, Secretary of the Faculty 

Edward K. Taylor, Assistant Treasurer and Business Manager 

Beatrice Berle, Counselor to Foreign Students 

Anna F. Burke, Librarian 



EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Deane W. Malott 
David P. Barr Joseph C. Hinsey 

Stanhope Bayne-Jones John G. Kidd 

Samuel Z. Levine 
James M. Neill 



MgKeen Cattell 
Oskar Diethelm 
R. Gordon Douglas 
Vincent du Vigneaud 
Frank Glenn 



Robert F. Pitts 
Wilson G. Smillie 



Standing Committees 



COMMITTEE ON CURRICULUM 

Vincent du Vigneaud, Chairman 
David P. Barr 
Charles G. Child, III 
Oskar Diethelm 

John Y. Sugg 



R. Gordon Douglas 
John G. Kidd 
Samuel Z. Levine 



COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Lawrence W. Hanlon, Chairman 
William H. Dunn Wilson G. SmilHe 

Dayton J. Edwards Richard B. Stark 

Donald B. Melville Alphonse E. Timpanelli 

Preston A. Wade 



LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

Thomas P. Almy, Chairman 



Henry L. Barnett 
Harry W. Burnett 
McKeen Cattell 
Frank Glenn 



James D. Hardy 
John MacLeod 
Julian R. Rachele 
Anna F. Burke 



COMMITTEE ON PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 
Joseph C. Hinsey, Chairman 
Heads of departments, or their representatives, responsible for 
the more important courses of each year. 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS 

James M. Neill, Chairman 

Charles G. Child, III John M. McLean 

Paul Reznikoff 



COMMITTEE ON PRIZES IN RESEARCH 

Robert F. Pitts, Chairman 

Thomas P. Almy John MacLeod 

S. W. Moore 



The Dean is ex officio a member of all committees. 

8 



Faculty 



DEANE W. MALOTT, President of the University. (A.B. 1921, University of 
Kansas; M.B.A. 1923, Harvard Business School; LL.D. 1941, Washburn Uni- 
versity; LL.D. 1951, Bryant College; LL.D. 1951, Hamilton College.) 

JOSEPH C. HINSEY, Dean of the Medical College. (B.S. 1922, M.S. 1923, 
Northwestern; Ph.D. 1927, Washington University.) 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

RUSSELL L. CECIL, M.D. [1910; 1950] Professor of Clinical Medicine 

EUGENE F. Dubois, M.D. [1910; 1950] Professor of Physiology 

DAYTON J. EDWARDS, Ph.D. [1918; 1950] Professor of Physiology 

N. CHANDLER FOOT, M.D. [1932; 1948] Professor of Surgical Pathology 

MALCOLM GOODRIDGE, M.D. [1910; 1946] Professor of Clinical Medicine 
CONNIE M. GUION, M.D. [1924; 1951] Professor of Clinical Medicine 

JAMES A. HARRAR, M.D. [1932; 1948] Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

and Gynecology 
ELISE STRANG L'ESPERANCE, M.D. [1910; 1950] Professor of Clinical 

Public Health and Preventive Medicine 
EUGENE L. OPIE, M.D. [1932; 1941] Professor of Pathology 

GEORGE PAPANICOLAOU, M.D. [1914; 1951] Professor of Clinical 

Anatomy 
BERNARD R. SAMUELS, M.D. [1914; 1942] Professor of Clinical Surgery 

(Opthalmology) 
OSCAR M. SCHLOSS, M.D. [1918; 1950] Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

HANS J. SCHWARTZ, M.D. [1911; 1942] Professor of Clinical Medicine 

(Dermatology) 
ALEXANDER R. STEVENS, M.D. [1924; 1946] Professor of Clinical Surgery 

( Urology) 
JOSHUA E. SWEET, M.D. [1926; 1941] Professor of Experimental Surgery 

PROFESSORS 

DAVID P. BARR, Professor of Medicine. Physician-in-Chief, New York Hospital; 
Consulting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1911, M.D. 1914, Cornell; LL.D. 
1929, Central College; Sc.D. 1946, Washington University. [1916; 1941]) 

DONALD G. W. BROOKING, Professor of Military Science and Tactics. Cap- 
tain, M.C., U.S. Army. (B.S. 1946, B.M. 1948, M.D. 1949, University of Min- 
nesota. [1951]) 

ALEXANDER BRUNSCHWIG, Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (B.A. 1923, M.S. 1924, University of Chicago; M.D. 1926, 
Rush. [1947]) 

McKEEN CATTELL, Professor of Pharmacology. (B.S. 1914, Columbia; A.M. 
1917, Ph.D. 1920, M.D. 1924, Harvard. [1924; 1943]) 



* The figures in brackets following the name of each faculty member indicate the date of original 
appointment and the year of induction into present rank. 



10 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

LLOYD F. CRAVER, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, Memor- 
ial Hospital. (A.B. 1915, M.D. 1918, Cornell. [1934; 1952]) 

OSKAR DIETHELM, Professor of Psychiatry. Psychiatrist-in-Chicf, New York 
Hospital. (Statsexamen 1922, U. of Zurich; M.D. 1923, U. of Berne. [1936]) 

R. GORDON DOUGLAS, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Obstctrician- 
and-Gynecologist-in-Chief, New York Hospital. (M.D.C.M. 1924, McGill. [1932; 
1949]) 

GUILFORD S. DUDLEY, Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, New 
York Hospital; Consultant in Surgery, Second Surgical Division, Bellcvuc Hos- 
pital. (A.B. 1910, M.D. 1913, Cornell. [1917; 1949]) 

VINCENT Du VIGNEAUD, Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1923, M.S. 1924, 
Ilhnois; Ph.D. 1927, Rochester. [1938]) 

FRANK GLENN, Lewis Atterbury Stimson Professor of Surgery. Surgcon-in-Chief, 
New York Hospital. (M.D. 1927, Washington University. [1932; 1947]) 

BYRON H. GOFF, Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Consultant in 
Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1908, M.D. 1911, Pennsyl- 
vania. [1935; 1950]) 

HARRY GOLD, Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (A.B. 1919, M.D. 1922, Cor- 
nell. [1922; 1947]) 

PHYLLIS GREENACRE, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Attending Psychiatrist, 
New York Hospital. (B.S. 1913, U. of Chicago; M.D. 1916, Rush. [1932; 1933]) 

LOUIS HAUSMAN, Professor of Clinical Medicine {Neurology) . Associate Attend- 
ing Physician (Neurology), New York Hospital; Visiting Neurologist in Charge, 
Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1912, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1916, 
Cornell. [1923; 1945]) 

JOSEPH C. HINSEY, Dean; Professor of Anatomy. (B.S. 1922, M.S. 1923, North- 
western; Ph.D. 1927, Washington University; ScD. 1951, Northwestern. [1936]) 

JOHN G. KIDD, Professor of Pathology. Pathologist-in-Chief, New York Hospital. 
A.B. 1928, Duke; M.D. 1932, Johns Hopkins. [1944]) 

SAMUEL Z. LEVINE, Professor of Pediatrics. Pediatrician-in-Chief, New York 
Hospital. (A.B. 1916, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1920, Cornell. 
[1924; 1936]) 

GEORGE M. LEWIS, Professor of Clinical Medicine {Dermatology) . Attending 
Physician (Dermatology), New York Hospital. (M.D. 1925, University of Al- 
berta; L.M.C.C. 1925, Medical College of Canada. [1932; 1949]) 

ASA L. LINCOLN, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1910, M.A. 
1911, Elon College; M.D. 1916, Johns Hopkins. [1921; 1941]) 

WILLIAM F. MacFEE, Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, New 
York Hospital. (A.B. 1914, University of Tennessee; M.D. 1918, Johns Hopkins. 
[1936; 1952]) 

JOHN M. McLean, Professor of Clinical Surgery {Ophthalmology). Attending Sur- 
geon in Charge of Ophthalmology, New York Hospital. (M.E. 1930, Stevens In- 
stitute; M.D. 1934, Cornell. [1941; 1943]) 

CHARLES V. MORRILL, Professor of Anatomy. (A.B. 1903, College of the City 
of New York; A.M. 1906, Ph.D. 1910, Columbia. [1915; 1951]) 

JAMES M. NEILL, Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. (B.S. 1917, Alle- 
gheny; Ph.D. 1921, Massachusetts Agricultural College; D.Sc. 1940, Allegheny. 
[1931]) 

ARTHUR PALMER, Professor of Clinical Surgery {Otolaryngology). Attending 
Surgeon (Otolaryngology), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1911, Brown; M.D. 1915, 
Cornell. [1923; 1948]) 

JOHN M. PEARCE, Professor of Pathology; Professor of Pathology in Surgery. At- 



FACULTY 11 

tending Pathologist, New York Hospital. (Ph.B. 1930, Yale; M.D. 1934, Har\'ard. 
[1948]) 

ROBERT F. PITTS, Professor of Physiology. (B.S. 1929, Butler University; Ph.D. 
1932, Johns Hopkins; M.D. 1938, New York University. [1942; 1950]) 

BRONSON S. RAY, Profesor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). Attending Sur- 
geon in Charge of Neurosurgery, New York Hospital; Consulting Neuro-surgeon, 
New York Hospital, Westchester Division; Clinical Assistant Visiting Neuro- 
Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1924, Frankhn; M.D. 1928, Northwestern. 
[1932; 1948]) 

THOMAS A. C. RENNTE, Professor of Psychiatry (Social Psychiatry). Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1924, University of Pittsburgh; M.D. 
1928, Harvard. [1942; 1950]) 

PAUL REZNIKOFF, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, New 
York Hospital; Consulting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1916, New York 
University; M.D. 1920, Cornell. [1924; 1946]) 

WILSON G. SMILLIE, Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. Con- 
sultant in Preventive Medicine and Public Health, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1908, Colorado College; M.D. 1912, D.P.H. 1916, Harvard. [1937]) 

LEWTS D. STEVENSON, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology) ; Associate 
Professor of Pathology. Attending Pathologist, Associate Attending Physician (Neu- 
rology), New York Hospital; Consulting Neurologist, New York Hospital, West- 
chester Division; Associate Visiting Neuro-Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 
1916, M.D. 1916, Queen's University. [1922; 1945]) 

HAROLD L. TEMPLE, Professor of Clinical Radiology. Attending Radiologist, 
New York Hospital. (B.S. 1932, M.D. 1935, University of Nebraska. [1941; 
1946]) 

SYDNEY WEINTRAUB, Professor of Clinical Radiology. Attending Radiologist, 
New York Hospital. (M.D. 1918, Columbia. [1932; 1950]) 

MAY G. WILSON, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending Pediatri- 
cian, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1911, Cornell. [1918; 1952]) 

PHILIP D. WILSON, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). Attending Sur- 
geon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Surgeon-in-Chief, Hospital for Special 
Surgery. (A.B. 1909, M.D. 1912, Harvard. [1951]) 

HAROLD G. WOLFF, Professor of Medicine (Neurology) ; Associate Professor of 
Psychiatry. Attending Physician, Associate Attending Psychiatrist, New York Hos- 
pital; Consulting Neurologist, New York Hospital, Westchester Division; Clinical 
Assistant Visiting Neuro-Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1918, College of 
the City of New York; M.D. 1923, M.A. 1928, Harvard. [1931; 1948]) 

IRVING S. WRIGHT, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, New 
York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1946; 1949]) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

FRANK E. ADAIR, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1910, ScD. 1934, Marietta College; M.D. 1915, Johns 
Hopkins. [1934; 1938]) 

THOMAS P. ALMY, James Ewing Associate Professor of Neoplastic Diseases (Med- 
icine) . Associate Attending Physician, New York Hospital. Assistant Attending 
Physician, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1935, M.D. 1939, Cornell. [1940; 1948]) 

ARTHUR F. ANDERSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1916, Tufts. [1930; 1948]) 

JOSEPH F. ARTUSIO, Jr. Associate Professor of Surgery (Anesthesiology) . Anes- 
thesiologist-in-Charge, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1939, St. Peter's; M.D. 1943, 
Cornell. [1946; 1952]) 

HORACE S. BALDWIN, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate At- 



12 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

tending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1917, Wesleyan University; M.D. 
1921, Cornell. [1923; 1947]) 

WILLL\M A. BARNES, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1933, College of the City of New York; 
M.D. 1937, Cornell. [1938; 1946]) 

HENRY L. BARNETT, Associate Professor of Pediatrics. Associate Attending Pedi- 
atrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1938, M.D. 1938, Washington University. 
[1946: 1950]) 

CHARLES M. BERRY, Associate Professor of Anatomy. (A.B. 1938, De Pauw; 
M.S. 1939, Ph.D. 1941, Northwestern. [1947; 1951]) 

CARL A. BINGER, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1910, M.D. 1914, Harvard. [1932; 1948]) 

GEORGE E. BINKLEY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (M.B. 1914, Toronto. [1950; 1952]) 

ROY W. BONSNES, Associate Professor of Biochemistry; Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry in Obstetrics and Gynecology. (B.S. 1930, University of Connecticut; 
Ph.D. 1939, Yale. [1941; 1950]) 

CHARLES G. CHILD, III, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Sur- 
geon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1930, Yale; M.D. 1934, Cornell. [1935; 1947]) 

ANTHONY C. CIPOLLARO, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatol- 
ogy). Assistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1924, Dartmouth; 
M.D. 1927, Columbia. [1948; 1951]) 

BRADLEY L. COLEY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1915, Yale; M.D. 1919, Columbia. [1941; 1950]) 

HERBERT CONWAY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery [Plastic Surgery). 
Attending Surgeon in Charge of Plastic Surgery, New York Hospital. (M.B. 1928, 
B.S. 1929, M.D. 1929, M.S. 1932, University of Cincinnati. [1932; 1946]) 

WILLIAM A. COOPER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, Stanford University; M.D. 1932, 
Cornell. [1934; 1946]) 

NELSON W. CORNELL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1918, M.D. 1921, Cornell. [1925; 1942]) 

HAROLD W. K. DARGEON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Attending 
Pediatrician, Memorial Hospital. (M.D. 1922, Albany. [1947; 1951]) 

EMERSON DAY, Associate Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. Director, Strang Cancer Prevention Clinic, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 
1934, Dartmouth; M.D. 1938, Harvard. [1947; 1950]) 

*JOHN E. DEITRICK, Associate Professor of Medicine. Associate Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1929, Princeton; M.D. 1933, Johns Hopkins. 
[1934; 1946]) 

EDWARD H. DENNEN, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1919, Tufts. 
[1933; 1949]) 

J. LOUISE DESPERT, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attend- 
ing Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, Barnard; M.D. 1932, New York 
University. [1939; 1951]) 

JOHN W. DRAPER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). Associate 
Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Visiting Surgeon in Charge 
of Urological Service, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1927, Dartmouth; M.D. 1931, 
Cornell. [1932; 1949]) 

WILLIAM H. DUNN, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attend- 



* On leave of absence. 



FACULTY 13 

ing Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, Rochester; M.D. 1927, Harvard. 
[1932; 1947]) 

HENRY S. DUNNING, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). As- 
sociate Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1927, M.D. 1930, Cor- 
nell. [1932; 1948]) 

JOHN H. ECKEL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending Sur- 
geon, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 
1929, New York University; M.D. 1933, Cornell. [1934; 1946]) 

GARY EGGLESTON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Consulting Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital; Consulting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (M.D. 1907, 
Cornell. [1911; 1939]) 

JOHN A. EVANS, Associate Professor of Radiology. Radiologist-in-Chief, New 
York Hospital. (B.S. 1931, New York University; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1937; 
1952]) 

CLAUDE E. FORKNER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1922, M.A. 1923, University of California; 
M.D. 1926, Har^'ard. [1938; 1946]) 

RICHARD H. FREYBERG, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.D. 1930, M.S. 1934, Uni- 
versity of Michigan. [1945]) 

KRISTIAN G. HANSSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Physical Med- 
cine). Director of Physical Medicine, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1920, M.D. 1923, 
Cornell. [1925; 1948]) 

JAMES D. HARDY, Associate Professor of Physiology. (A.B. 1924, A.M. 1925, 
Mississippi; Ph.D. 1930, Johns Hopkins. [1937; 1947]) 

EDWIN T. HAUSER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1916, College of the City of New York; M.D. 
1922, Cornell. [1925; 1949]) 

EDWARD J. HEHRE, Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. (A.B. 
1934, M.D. 1937, Cornell. [1938; 1949]) 

GEORGE W. HENRY, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Attending Psychi- 
atrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1912, Wesleyan; M.D. 1916, Johns Hopkins. 
[1928; 1932]) 

CRANSTON W. HOLMAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate At- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Assistant Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hos- 
pital. (A.B. 1927, M.D. 1930, Stanford. [1932; 1946]) 

CARL T. JAVERT, Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Attending 
Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1932, Buffalo. [1937; 
1949]) 

MORTON C. KAHN, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Med- 
icine. (B.S. 1916, Ph.D. 1924, Cornell: A.M. 1917, Columbia; ScD. 1938, 
Havana. [1919; 1934]) 

HENRY D. LAUSON, Associate Professor of Physiology; Associate Professor of 
Physiology in Pediatrics. Assistant Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. 
(B.S. 1936, Ph.D. 1939, M.D. 1940, University of Wisconsin. [1950; 1951]) 

FREDERICK L. LIEBOLT, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
Attending Surgeon in Charge of Orthopedics, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1925, 
LL.D. 1928, University of Arkansas; M.D. 1930, Washington University; Sc.D. 
1937, Columbia. [1939; 1946]) 

MARY E. H. LOVELESS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Allergy). As- 
sistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1921, M.D. 1925, Stanford. 
[1939; 1948]) 

JOHN MacLeod, Associate Professor of Anatomy; Assistant Professor of Physi- 
ology. (A.B. 1934, M.Sc. 1937, New York University; Ph.D. 1941, Cornell. [1941; 
1949]) 



14 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

GERVAIS W. McAULIFFE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngol 
ogy). Attending Surgeon (Otolaryngology), New York Hospital. (M.D. 1920 
Long Island College Hospital. [1926; 1942]) 

HOWARD S. McCANDLISH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynec 
ology. Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1917 
University of Virginia. [1921; 1949]) 

WALSH McDERMOTT, Associate Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1930, Princeton; M.D. 1934, Columbia. [1935; 1946]) 

CHARLES M. McLANE, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital; Assistant Attend 
ing Radiologist (Obstetrics and Gynecology), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1924 
M.D. 1928, Johns Hopkins. [1932; 1949]) 

ALLISTER M. McLELLAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology) 
Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Attending Urologist, New 
York Hospital, Westchester Division. (M.D. 1924, McGill. [1932; 1948]) 

VICTOR F. MARSHALL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). At- 
tending Surgeon in Charge of Urology, New York Hospital; Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (M.D. 1937, University of Virginia. [1938; 1946]) 

HAYES E. MARTIN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1911, M.D. 1917, Iowa. [1941; 1950]) 

DONALD B. MELVILLE, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1936, M.S. 
1937, Ph.D. 1939, University of Illinois. [1944; 1948]) 

ADE T. MILHORAT, Associate Professor of Medicine in Psychiatry; Associate Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Psychiatry. Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1924, Columbia; M.D. 1928, Cornell. [1933; 1951]) 

JAMES A. MOORE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology) . At- 
tending Surgeon in Charge of Otolaryngology, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1930, 
Davidson College; M.D. 1934, Harvard. [1941; 1948]) 

S. W. MOORE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, New 
York Hospital; Assistant Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1926, David- 
son; M.D. 1930, Harvard. [1932; 1946]) 

CARL MUSCHENHEIM, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, M.D. 1931, Columbia. [1933; 1946]) 

JOSEPH N. NATHANSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecol- 
ogy. Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. CM. 
1919, McGill. [1926; 1951]) 

WILLIAM F. NICKEL, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant At- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hos- 
pital. (A.B. 1930, M.D. 1934, Johns Hopkins. [1935; 1950]) 

THEODORE W. OPPEL, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.A. 1927, Wisconsin; M.D. 1929, Penn- 
sylvania. [1923; 1951]) 

GEORGE T. PACK, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1920, Ohio State; M.D. 1922, Yale. [1935; 1950]) 

HAROLD E. B. PARDEE, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1906, M.D. 1909, Columbia. [1917; 
1926]) 

RUSSEL H. PATTERSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate At- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 
1914, Georgia; M.D. 1918, Harvard. [1921; 1946]) 

E. COOPER PERSON, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant At- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hos- 
pital. (A.B. 1931, University of North Carolina; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1936; 
1946]) 

RALPH F. PHILLIPS, Associate Professor of Radiology. Associate Attending Radia- 



FACULTY 15 

tion Therapist, Memorial Hospital. (B.S.M.B. 1928, M.S. 1930, University of 
London; D.M.R.E. 1933, Royal College of England. [1950; 1951]) 

JULL\N R. RACHELE, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. (B.A. 1934, M.S. 
1935, Ph.D. 1939, New York University. [1940; 1948]) 

HENRY B. RICHARDSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1910, 
M.D. 1914, Harvard. [1924; 1932]) 

WALTER F. RIKER, Associate Professor of Pharmacology. (B.S. 1939, Columbia; 
M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1941; 1950]) 

SIDNEY ROTHBARD, Associate Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Colgate; M.D. 1935, Rochester. [1951]) 

ROBERT S. SHERMAN, Associate Professor of Radiology. Attending Roentgenol- 
ogist, Memorial Hospital. (Ph.B. 1931, Brown; M.D. 1935, Harvard. [1947; 
1951]) 

EPHRAIM SHORR, Associate Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician, New 
York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, M.D. 1922, Yale. [1926; 1942]) 

DONALD J. SIMONS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Neuro-Phychiatrist, Belle- 
vue Hospital. (A.B. 1927, Brown; M.D. 1931, Harvard. [1939; 1948]) 

CARL H. SMITH, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.A. 1915, College of the City of New York; 
M.A. 1917, Columbia; M.D. 1922, Cornell. [1928; 1947]) 

FRANK R. SMITH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital; Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1917, Yale; M.D. 1921, Harvard. [1932; 
1950]) 

RICHMOND STEPHENS, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attending Orthopedic 
Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (B.S. 1911, M.D. 1913, Columbia. [1951]) 

HAROLD J. STEWART, Associate Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1915, M.D. 1919, A.M. 1923, Johns Hopkins. [1932]) 

PHILIP M. STIMSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1910, Yale; M.D. 1914, Cornell. 
[1919; 1942]) 

JOHN Y. SUGG, Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. (B.S. 1926, 
Ph.D. 1931, Vanderbilt. [1932; 1943]) 

HENRY J. TAGNON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attend- 
ing Physician, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1931, Liege; M.D. 1936, Brussels. [1947; 
1948]) 

T. CAMPBELL THOMPSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ortho- 
pedics). Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attending Or- 
thopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (A.B. 1924, RolHns; M.D. 1928, 
Johns Hopkins; M.Sc.D. 1936, Columbia. [1951]) 

EDWARD TOLSTOI, Associate Profesor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, Yale; M.D. 1923, Cornell. [1927; 1947]) 

RALPH R. TOMPSETT, Associate Professor of Medicine. Associate Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1934, M.D. 1939, Cornell. [1947; 1952]) 

JANET TRAVELL, Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (A.B. 1922, 
Wellesley; M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1930; 1947]) 

PRESTON A. WADE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1922, M.D. 1925, Cornell. [1927; 1946]) 

LEWIS C. WAGNER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). At- 
tending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attending Orthopedic Sur- 
geon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (A.B. 1916, Georgetown; M.D. 1920, Johns 
Hopkins. [1951]) 



16 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

JAMES H. WALL, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Medical Director, 
New York Hospital, Westchester Division. (M.D. 1927, Jefferson Medical College. 
1933; 1946]) 

ROBERT F. WATSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1934, University of Virginia. [1946; 1950]) 

BRUCE P. WEBSTER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (M.D.C.M. 1925, McGill. [1932; 1947]) 

LIVINGSTON WELCH, Associate Professor of Psychology. (A.B. 1931, M.A. 
1932, Ph.D. 1935, Columbia. [1947; 1952]) 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

HAROLD B. ADAMS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1917, Columbia; M.D. 1920, Cornell. 
[1934; 1944]) 

ANDREW J. AKELAITIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 
Assistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital; Clinical Assistant Visiting 
Neuro-Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1925, M.D. 1929, Johns Hopkins. 
[1947]) 

SILVIO BAEZ, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (B.S. 1936, M.D. 1943, 
National Asuncion Medical School, Paraguay. [1948; 1952]) 

IRVIN BALENSWEIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). At- 
tending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1915, College of the 
City of New York; M.D. 1918, Cornell. [1920; 1934]) 

LEONA BAUMGARTNER, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine; Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. (A.B. 1923, M.A. 1925, Kan- 
sas; Ph.D. 1932, M.D. 1934, Yale. [1935; 1940]) 

SAMUEL R. BERENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Pre- 
ventive Medicine; Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. (A.B. 1931, Amherst; 
M.D. 1935, University of Vermont, [1947; 1951]) 

BEATRICE B. BERLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. (A.B. 1923, Vassar; M.A. 1924, Columbia; M.D. 1938, New York Uni- 
versity. [1946; 1950]) 

KEEVE BRODMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (B.S. 1927, College 
of the City of New York; M.D. 1931, Cornell. [1938; 1950]) 

IRWIN D. J. BROSS, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, 
(Vital Statistics). (B.A. 1942, University of North CaroHna; M.S. 1948, North 
Carolina State College; Ph.D. 1949, University of North Carolina. [1952]) 

JACOB BUCKSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Visiting Roentgen- 
ologist, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1911, College of the City of New York; M.D. 
1915, Cornell. [1927; 1940]) 

HARRY W. BURNETT, Assistant Professor of Radiology. Associate Attending 
Radiologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1940, Miami University; M.D. 1943, 
Northwestern University. [1948; 1949]) 

KATHARINE BUTLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital; Assistant Visiting Physician, Bellevue 
Hospital. (A.B. 1920, Mt. Holyoke; M.A. 1926, Columbia; M.D. 1935, Cornell. 
[1938; 1951]) 

HENRY A. CARR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Princeton; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1947; 
1950]) 

ANNE C. CARTER, Assistant Professor of Medicine. (A.B. 1941, Wellesley; M.D. 
1944, Cornell. [1945; 1952]) 

WILLIAM H. GARY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
(M.D. 1905, Syracuse. [1937; 1946]) 



FACULTY 17 

AARON D. CHAVES, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine; Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1931, William and Mary; M.D. 1935, New York 
University. [1946; 1951]) 

CLEMENT B. P. COBB, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1922, Williams; M.D. 1926, Har- 
vard. [1934; 1944]) 

JOHN R. COBB, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). Associate 
Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital. Attending Orthopedic 
Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (A.B. 1925, Brown University; M.D. 
1930, Yale; Med.Sc.D. 1936, Columbia. [1951]) 

EUGENE J. COHEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (B.A. 1933, M.S. 1934, Wisconsin; M.D. 1938, 
Cornell. [1940; 1952]) 

JOHN T. COLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Associ- 
ate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1936, 
Duke; M.D. 1940, University of Maryland. [1941; 1951]) 

ARTHUR D. CONSOLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery) . 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Neurosurgery), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1937, 
Cornell; M.D. 1941, Cornell. [1944; 1951]) 

WILLLAM COOPER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). As- 
sociate Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics) New York Hospital; Attending Ortho- 
pedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (B.S. 1929, New York University; 
M.D. 1933, Long Island College [1951]) 

FRANK E. CORMLA., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatology) . 
Assistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1926, M.D. 1930, Uni- 
versity of Vermont. [1946; 1948]) 

ROBERT L. CRAIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 
1923, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1932; 1949]) 

MARGARET DANN, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. Associate Attending Pedia- 
trician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, Oberlin; M.S. 1925, IlHnois; Ph.D. 1932, 
Cornell; M.D. 1937, Yale. [1938; 1945]) 

MICHAEL R. DEDDISH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate At- 
tending Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1933, M.D. 1937, Ohio State Univer- 
sity, [1942; 1951]) 

HENRY D. DIAMOND, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital; Associate Attending Physician, Memorial Hos- 
pital. (A.B. 1941, M.D. 1944, University of Louisville. [1947; 1952]) 

PAUL F. DE GARA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics (Allergy). Assistant 
Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D, 1926, University of Heidel- 
berg; M.D. 1927, University of Padua. [1941 ; 1950]) 

PETER G. DENKER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology) . As- 
sociate Visiting Neuro-Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1923, College of the 
City of New York; M.D. 1927, Cornell. [1932; 1941]) 

JAMES A. DINGWALL, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant At- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 
1936, Dartmouth; M.D. 1940, Cornell. [1941; 1946]) 

ROBERT O. Dubois, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1915, M.D. 1919, Columbia. [1923; 
1940]) 

EDWARD A. DUNLAP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Ophthalmology), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1932, 
Westminster; M.D. 1935, Western Reserve. [1945; 1948]) 

HOWARD A. EDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 



18 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1938, University of Wisconsin; M.D. 1942, 
M.P.H., 1945, Harvard. [1950]) 

HERBERT R. EDWARDS, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. (M.D. 1918, College of Medical Evangelists. [1942]) 

GEORGE F. EGAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Dental Surgery). At- 
tending Dental Surgeon in Charge, New York Hospital. (D.M.D. 1931, Harvard. 
[1933: 1948]) 

HELENE ELLA.SBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1919, University of Berhn. [1943; 
1948]) 

JOHN T. ELLIS, Assistant Professor of Pathology; Assistant Professor of Pathology 
in Surgery. Assistant Attending Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1942, Uni- 
versity of Texas; M.D. 1945, Northwestern. [1948; 1950]) 

RALPH L. ENGLE, Jr., Assistant Professor of Medicine. (B.S. 1942, University of 
Florida; M.D. 1945, Johns Hopkins. [1949; 1952]) 

NATHAN EPSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. (B.S. 1922, M.I.T.; 
Ph.D. 1928, Columbia; M.D. 1934, Munich. [1946; 1952]) 

JOSEPH H. FARROW, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1926, M.D. 1930, University of Virginia. 
[1950; 1951]) 

AARON FEDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1938, University of Maryland. [1941; 
1950]) 

GEORGE A. FIEDLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Urology). Associ- 
ate Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1923, Wisconsin; 
M.D. 1925, Pennsylvania. [1950]) 

WILLIAM F. FINN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1936, Holy Cross; M.D. 1940, Cornell. [1942; 1948]) 

ELIZABETH F. FOCHT, Assistant Professor of Radiology {Physics). Associate 
Attending Physicist, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1935, Barnard. [1947; 1951]) 

WILLIAM T. FOLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1933, Columbia; M.D. 1937; Cornell. 
[1946; 1951]) 

FRANKLIN M. FOOTE, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Med- 
icine. (B.S. 1930, M.D. 1933, D.P.H. 1935, Yale. [1941]) 

LEWIS M. FRAAD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1935, University of Vienna. [1945; 
1949]) 

JOHN E. FRANKLIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. Assistant Attending Pediatrician, Memorial 
Hospital. (B.S. 1928, Notre Dame; M.D. 1932, Harvard. [1947; 1948]) 

ALAN W. ERASER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Assistant Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1939, Bard; M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1944; 
1952]) 

EDGAR L. FRAZELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1929, M.D. 1931, University of Texas. 
[1950]) 

CONSTANCE FRIESS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attend- 
ing Physician, New York HospitaL (A.B. 1928, Barnard; M.D. 1932, Cornell. 
[1933; 1944]) 

RALPH W. CAUSE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. As- 
sociate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, 
University of Texas; M.D. 1930, Harvard. [1935; 1947]) 

HAROLD GENVERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 



FACULTY 19 

Surgeon, New York Hospital. (D.D.S. 1932, Pennsylvania; M.D. 1936, Yale. 

[1937; 1950]) 
WILLIAM A. GEOHEGAN, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. (E.E. 1929, M.D. 

1941, Cornell. [1941; 1944]) 
RANDOLPH GEPFERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 

1929, University of Georgia. [1941; 1951]) 
JOHN C. A. GERSTER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. (A.B. 1902, M.D. 

1905, Columbia. [1913; 1919]) 
HELENA GILDER, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (A.B. 1935, Vassar; M.D. 

1940, Cornell. [1947; 1950]) 

WILLIAM P. GIVEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 

1941, Harvard, M.D., Cornell. [1946; 1952]) 

OSCAR CLASSMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. As- 
sociate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, 
University of Utah; M.D. 1925, New York University. [1946; 1951]) 

MARTIN J. GLYNN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Fordham; M.D. 1935, Long Island 
College. [1939; 1943]) 

HENRY P. GOLDBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1932, M.D. 1936, Johns Hop- 
kins. [1946; 1950]) 

DAN M. GORDON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Ophthalmology), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1929, 
M.D. 1932, Michigan. [1945; 1948]) 

WILLIAM J. GRACE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1938, St. Peter's College; M.D. 1942, 
Cornell. [1944; 1950]) 

ARTHUR V. GREELEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecol- 
ogy. Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. 
(B.S. 1925, Yale; M.D. 1929, Johns Hopkins. [1932; 1949]) 

SIDNEY GREENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Visit- 
ing Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1925, M.D. 1928, Cornell. [1934; 1950]) 

THEODORE C. GREENE, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. (A.B. 1920, M.D. 
1924, Harvard. [1951]) 

THEODORE H. GREINER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (M.D. 
1947, Washington University. [1948; 1952]) 

SUSAN J. HADLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (A.B. 1941, Wis- 
consin; M.D. 1944, Cornell. [1946; 1952]) 

FRANCIS J. HAMILTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate 
Attending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, St. Joseph's College; 
M.D. 1933, Jefferson. [1940; 1949]) 

LAWRENCE W. HANLON, Assistant Dean, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
(A.B. 1935, M.D. 1938, Cornell. [1946; 1948]) 

JAMES Q. HARALAMBIE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant 
Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Oberhn; M.D. 1935, 
Yale. [1939; 1949]) 

HELEN HARRINGTON, Assistant Profesor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B., M.A. 1916, University of Den- 
ver; M.D. Johns Hopkins. [1933; 1944]) 

RICHARD L. HARRIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. (M.D. 1920, 
University of Georgia. [1951]) 

W. HALL HAWKINS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 



20 - CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

(A.B. 1906, Central University of Kentucky : M.D. 1911, Johns Hopkins. [1932; 
1941]) 

MILTON HELPERN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Visiting 
Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1922, College of the City of New York; 
M.b. 1926, Cornell. [1931; 1940]) 

NORMAN L. HIGINBOTHAM, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate 
Attending Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (M.D. CM. 1926, McGill. [1940; 1950]) 

LAWRENCE E. HINKLE, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (A.B. 
1938, University of North Carolina; M.D. 1942, Harvard. [1947; 1951]) 

EVELYN HOLT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assisting Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, Wellesley; M.A. 1921, M.D. 1924, 
Cornell. [1926; 1952]) 

GUSTAVUS A. HUMPHREYS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urol- 
ogy). Assistant Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Associate 
Visiting Surgeon (Urology), Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1927, Princeton; M.D. 
1932, Columbia. [1937; 1946]) 

FREDERICK C. HUNT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1924, Western Ontario .[1932; 
1940]) 

GERALD R. JAMEISON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1918, Albany Medical College. [1933; 
1936]) 

GEORGE JASPIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. Associate Attending 
Radiologist in Charge of School of Radiology, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1932, 
Columbia; M.D. 1936, Michigan. [1945; 1948]) 

D. REES JENSEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1925, Columbia. [1928; 1949]) 

DONALD G. JOHNSON, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Asso- 
ciate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.A. 1936, 
Maine; M.D. 1940, Yale. [1942; 1948]) 

EDMUND N. JOYNER, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant 
Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1927, Virginia Military Insti- 
tute; M.D. 1932, Cornell. [1934; 1948]) 

GEORGE L. KAUER, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate 
Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1933, New York University; M.D. 

1937, Cornell. [1938; 1949]) 

BENJAMIN H. KEAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine {Tropical Med- 
icine). Assistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1933, Califor- 
nia; M.D. 1937, Columbia. [1952]) 

SAMUEL F. KELLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology) . 
Attending Surgeon (Otolaryngology), New York Hospital. (M.D. 1921, Uni- 
versity of Texas. [1926; 1943]) 

AARON KELLNER, Assistant Professor of Pathology. Associate Attending Path- 
ologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1934, Yeshiva University; M.S. 1935, Co- 
lumbia; M.D. 1939, University of Chicago. [1946; 1950]) 

CHARLES J. KENSLER, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. (A.B. 1937, M.A. 

1938, Columbia; Ph.D. 1948, Cornell. [1946; 1950]) 

ANN P. KENT, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 

1930, George Washington University: M.D. 1933, University of Maryland; 

M.P.H. 1939, Johns Hopkins. [1950; 1951]) 
SEYMOUR G. KLEBANOFF, Assistant Professor of Psychology. (A.B. 1937, 

M.S. 1939, Yale; Ph.D. 1947, Northwestern. [1950]) 
MARGARET KLUMPP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assisting At- 



FACULTY 21 

tending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1928, Tufts; M.D. 1932, Cornell. 
[1950; 1951]) 

HEDWIG KOENIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1918, Barnard; M.A. 1920, Columbia; 
M.D. 1929, Johns Hopkins. [1935; 1944]) 

RICHARD N. KOHL, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. Assistant Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1938, M.D. 1942, University of Cin- 
cinnati. [1945; 1950]) 

BARBARA M. KORSCH, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1941, Smith; M.D. 1944, Johns Hop- 
kins. [1947; 1952]) 

ELMER E. KRAMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist. New York Hospital. (B.S. 
1935, M.D. Tulane. [1946; 1952]) 

MILTON L. KRAMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.D. 1929, Columbia. 
[1935; 1949]) 

JOHN S. LaDUE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. Associate Attending Physician, Memorial Hos- 
pital. (B.S. 1932, M.S. 1940, Ph.D. 1941, University of Minnesota; M.D. 1936, 
Harvard. [1947; 1948]) 

NORVELLE C. LaMAR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate At- 
tending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1921, M.D. 1925, Indiana. 
[1932; 1942]) 

ERNEST W. LAMPE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery; Assistant Professor 
of Clinical Anatomy. Assistant Attending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Visiting 
Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1920, University of Minnesota; M.D. 1923, 
Rush Medical School. [1941; 1945]) 

RICHARD W. LAWTON, Assistant Professor of Physiology. (A.B. 1942, Dart- 
mouth, M.D. 1944, Cornell. [1948; 1951]> 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON LEIGHTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psy- 
chiatry. Assistant Attending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, 
Princeton; M.A. 1934, Cambridge; M.D. 1936, Johns Hopkins. [1947]) 

LEON I. LEVINE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 
1918, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1922, Cornell. [1924; 1939]) 

MILTON I. LEVINE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1923, College of the City of New 
York; M.D. 1927, Cornell. [1933; 1944]) 

SOL S. LICHTMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1918, College of the City of New 
York; M.D. 1921, Cornell. [1943; 1947]) 

E. HUGH LUCKEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. Director, Second Medical Division, Bellevue 
Hospital. (B.S. 1940, Union; M.D. 1944, Vanderbilt. [1948; 1950]) 

FRANK J. McGOWAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, M.D. 1921, Columbia. [1932; 
1950]) 

FREDERICK C. McLELLAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Attending Urol- 
ogist, New York Hospital, Westchester Division. (B.S. 1929, M.D. 1933, Dal- 
housie; M.S. 1936, Michigan. [1941; 1948]) 

GORDON P. McNEER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate At- 
tending Surgeon, Memorial Hospital, (M.D. 1931, University of Pennsylvania. 
[1950; 1951]) 



22 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

ABRAHAM MAZUR, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine. (B.S. 
1932, College of the City of New York; M.A. 1934, Ph.D. 1938, Columbia. 
[1941; 1949]) 

CURTIS L. MENDELSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. 
(A.B. 1934, Michigan; M.D. 1938, Cornell. [1947]) 

MARY E. MERCER, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics; Assistant Professor of Pe- 
diatrics in Psychiatry. Associate Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. 
(B.S. 1932, Simmons; M.D. 1943, Colorado. [1945, 1948]) 

LAURENCE MISCALL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Visiting Surgeon, 
Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.D. 1930, Cornell. [1942; 1947]) 

WALTER MODELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (B.S. 1928, 
College of the City of New York; M.D. 1932, Cornell. [1932; 1949]) 

CHARLES T. OLCOTT, Assistant Professor of Pathology. Associate Attending 
Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1911, Princeton; M.D. 1916, Cornell. 
[1926; 1943]) 

PHILIP OLLSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preven- 
tive Medicine. (M.D. 1927, Long Island College of Medicine. [1944; 1950]) 

CHARLES H. O'REGAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate 
Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, St. Francis Xavier; 
M.D. 1928, McGill. [1932; 1944]) 

WARD D. O" SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant At- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1938, Fordham; M.D. 1942, Cor- 
nell. [1943; 1951]) 

RALPH S. OVERMAN, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine. (A.B. 
1938, University of Illinois; M.S. 1941, University of Wisconsin; Ph.D. 1942, 
University of Wisconsin [1947; 1951]) 

HERBERT PARSONS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery) . 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Neurosurgery), New York Hospital; Associate 
Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Yale; M.D. 1935, Harvard. 
[1938; 1949]) 

ROBERT L. PATTERSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthope- 
dics). Associate Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attend- 
ing Orthopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery, (A.B. 1928, University of 
Georgia; M.D. 1932, Harvard. [1951]) 

MARY ANN PAYNE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1935, Hood; M.A. 1941, Ph.D. 1943, 
Wisconsin; M.D. 1945, Cornell. [1946; 1952]) 

T. ARTHUR PEARSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. Assistant 
Attending Radiologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1930, Gustavus Adolphus; 
M.A. 1934, M.D. 1935, University of Minnesota. [1948; 1949]) 

NORMAN PLUMMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital ; Associate Visiting Physician, Bellevue 
Hospital. (A.B. 1922, University of California; M.D. 1926, ' Cornell. [1928; 
1941]) 

JOHN L. POOL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1930, Princeton; M.D. 1934, Columbia. 
[1948]) 

CURTIS T. PROUT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Assistant Medical 
Director and Clinical Director, New York Hospital, Westchester Division. 
(A.B. 1921, M.D. 1924, Cornell; M.S. 1930, University of Michigan. [1948; 
1951]) 

GEORGE C. READER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1940, M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1946; 
1950]) 



FACULTY 23 

PETER C. RIZZO, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Orthopedics). Asso- 
ciate Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attending Ortho- 
pedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. [M.D. 1926, Bellevue]) 

FRED V. ROCKWELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate At- 
tending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, M.D. 1936, Rochester. 
[1939; 1946]) 

MEYER ROSENSOHN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 
1901, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1909, Columbia. [1932; 1941]) 

NELSON B. SACKETT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 
1917, Princeton; M.D. 1923, Columbia. [1932; 1948]) 

JOHN G. SCHMIDT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Orthopedics). Asso- 
ciate Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1925, Wil- 
liams; M.D. 1930, Harvard. [1939; 1946]) 

JOHN F. SEYBOLT, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. (B.S. 1938, Yale: M.D. 1943, 
Cornell. [1947; 1951]) 

J. JAMES SMITH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Visiting 
Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1934, St. Peters; M.D. 1938, Cornell. [1939; 
1946]) 

STUART S. SNYDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Ophthalmology). 
Assistant Attending Physician (Ophthalmology), New York Hospital. (B.Sc. 
1941, York College; M.D. 1944, University of Nebraska. [1947 ; 1951]) 

RICHARD B. STARK, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Plastic Surgery). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Plastic Surgery), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1936, 
Stanford; M.D. 1941, Cornell. [1950; 1952]) 

ISRAEL STEINBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine; Assistant Professor 
of Clinical Radiology. Assistant Attending Radiologist (Angiocardiography), New 
York Hospital. (B.S. 1924, M.D. 1928, Harvard. [1940; 1949]) 

ARTHUR M. SUTHERLAND, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant 
Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1932, Yale; M.D. 1936, Colum- 
bia. [1937; 1951]) 

JOHN E. SUTTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B, 
1915, A.M. 1917, M.D. 1920, Cornell. [1923; 1950]) 

ALPHONSE E. TIMPANELLI, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant 
Attending Physician, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Physician, Bellevue 
Hospital. (A.B. 1932, Columbia; M.D. 1936, Cornell. [1938; 1949]) 

JOHN H. TRAVIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. (M.B. 1911, Univer- 
sity of Toronto. [1941; 1945]) 

NORMAN L. TREVES, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1915, A.M. 1916, Wabash College; M.D. 
1920, Johns Hopkins. [1948; 1950]) 

FRANCIS P. TWINEM, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Urology). Asso- 
ciate Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1917, Wooster 
College; M.A. 1919, Princeton; M.D. 1925, Harvard. [1950]) 

JAMES S. TYHURST, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. (B.Sc, M.D. CM. 
1944, McGill. [1951]) 

F. STEPHEN VOGEL, Assistant Professor of Pathology; Assistant Professor of 
Pathology in Surgery. Assistant Attending Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1941, Villanova; M.D. 1944, Western Reserve. [1948; 1950]) 

WILLIAM L. WATSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Sur- 
geon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1922, M.D. 1925, Cornell. [1940; 1950]) 

WILLIS M. WEEDEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 



24 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Medicine. Assistant Attending Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1916, M.D. 
1919, Cornell. [1922; 1950]) 

EXIE E. WELSCH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Assistant Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1930; M.D. 1932, University of Indiana. 
[1949]) 

JOHN P. WEST, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending Sur- 
geon, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1927, Alabama Polytechnic Institute; M.D. 1932, 
Cornell. [1938; 1949]) 

LOUIS E. WEYMULLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.Sc. 1923, M.D. 1925, University of 
Nebraska. [1936; 1949]) 

MARJORIE A. WHEATLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant 
Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, Vassar; M.D. 1929, Co- 
lumbia. [1931; 1945]) 

CHARLES H. WHEELER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital; Assistant Attending Physician, Memorial 
Hospital. (B.S. 1931, Princeton; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1936; 1944]) 

STEPHEN WHITE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. Associate Attending 
Radiologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1920, College of the City of New York; 
M.D. 1924, Cornell. [1931; 1944]) 

WILLET F. WHITMORE, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1938, Rutgers; M.D. 1942, Cornell. [1943; 
1948]) 

HAROLD N. WILLARD, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Med- 
icine. (A.B. 1939, Yale; M.D. 1943, Johns Hopkins. [1951]) 

BYARD WILLIAMS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital; Attending Physician, New York Hospital, West- 
chester Division; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1926, Williams; 
M.D. 1930, Columbia. [1933; 1949]) 



General Statement 



HISTORY 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY Medical College was established by the 
Board of Trustees of Cornell University on April 14, 1898, when they 
elected Dr. William M. Polk Director of the College and Dean of the 
Medical Faculty and appointed six professors. The Medical College was 
made possible by the munificence of Colonel Oliver H. Payne, who pro- 
vided the funds for the erection of the original building, located at 28th 
Street and First Avenue, and who pledged his support to the new institu- 
tion. For several years he provided funds for the annual support of the 
college and later placed the institution on a secure foundation by making 
generous provision for its permanent endowment by a gift of over four 
million dollars. 

In October, 1898, instruction began in temporary quarters. As the 
Medical College admitted a number of students to advanced standing, 
Cornell University granted the degree of Doctor of Medicine for the 
first time in 1899. 

The Cornell University Medical College from its foundation has 
undertaken to carry out two allied activities: the development of phy- 
sicians of the best type and the extension of medical knowledge by 
means of research. The Medical Faculty has held from the beginning 
of its existence the attitude that these two functions are necessary as 
constituting a true university school. It is committed not only to conduct 
teaching of high order but also to study disease and the sciences under- 
lying medicine with the purpose of adding to medical knowledge. 



THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL-CORNELL 
MEDICAL COLLEGE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University Medical College and the New York Hospital 
have been cooperating for a long time in an arrangement for medical 
teaching. In September, 1932, however, the two institutions took up 
occupancy in the same plant. 

The New York Hospital was founded by Royal Charter on June 13, 
1771, in the reign of King George HI, and has stood throughout the life 
of the nation as one of the foremost hospitals in the United States, as 
an institution rendering service to the sick and injured, and as a center 
of medical education. For a number of years the Hospital and the Medi- 

25 



26 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

cal College had been partially affiliated. In June, 1927, an agreement 
was entered into between Cornell University and the New York Hospi- 
tal by which the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical College Associa- 
tion was formed for the purpose of bringing together their facilities and 
cooperating in the care of patients, in medical education, and in medical 
research. In order to harmonize the interests of the Hospital and of the 
Medical College, the Joint Administrative Board was formed, consisting 
of three representatives of each institution and a seventh member elected 
by the Hospital and by the University. 

Additional endowment was secured by each institution. A group of 
buildings was erected along the East River between 68th and 71st Streets, 
adjoining the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. The new plant 
affords separate buildings for each of the various laboratory' departments 
and includes approximately 1,182 hospital beds. Provision is made for 
medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, and psychiatry 
in five distinct clinical units. 

The Faculty of the Medical College and the professional staff of the 
Hospital are organized so as to form one body established on a university 
basis. 

The new plant affords very favorable conditions for the conduct of 
medical education, for the pursuit of medical research, and for the care 
of patients in all phases of medical practice. 

FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

From the point of view of medical instruction, the facilities provided 
by the plant of the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical College Associa- 
tion are in many respects unexcelled. The plant consists of eleven build- 
ings, joined either directly or by underground passages. These provide 
ample accommodations for the care of hospital patients, for the teaching 
of the clinical branches, and for the various activities connected with the 
work of the preclinical departments of the medical college. 

CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE. Instruction in the medical sciences 
is conducted in a group of buildings extending along York Avenue from 
68th to 70th Streets, centering in a court at the end of 69th Street where 
the entrance to the Medical College is located. This group comprises four 
units facing on York Avenue, each of which is five stories high. The 
extreme northern and southern buildings connect with the central group 
by means of two-story structures. In this series of buildings the one to 
the north (unit A) is devoted entirely to the department of anatomy; 
the one next to this on the south (unit B) to bacteriology and immun- 
ology; the third (unit D) to physiology; the fourth (unit E) to bio- 
chemistry and pharmacology. A seven-story building (unit C) joins the 
buildings B and D in the center, and in this are the offices of the Medical 
College, the library, and the department of pathology. This central 
building of the College is joined on all floors with the central hospital 



GENERAL STATEMENT 27 

building. Certain of the laboratories of the department of public health 
and preventive medicine are located in the two-story building which ad- 
joins the bacteriology unit to the north, but the major part of this de- 
partment is comprised in the Kips Bay-Yorkville Health Center building 
of the City of New York, located half a block west from the Medical 
College on 69th Street. 

In the main buildings of the Medical College, student laboratories and 
lecture rooms are provided on the second and third floors, and extensive 
facilities for research by staff and students are available on other floors. 
Locker rooms are provided for the use of students. A cafeteria under the 
direction of the chief dietitian of the New York Llospital is maintained 
for students and Faculty. 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL. Clinical instruction is given in the five sepa- 
rate clinics forming the New York Hospital. The medical and surgical 
clinics occupy the central hospital building, while the women's clinic, 
the pediatric clinic, and the psychiatric clinic extend from north to 
south, overlooking the East River. Each cHnic contains, besides provision 
for bed patients, its own out-patient department, lecture rooms, and 
laboratories for routine study and for clinical research. Special provision 
has also been made for the laboratory work of students. The medical 
clinic occupies the second to fourth floors of the central hospital build- 
ing, with six pavilions for bed patients, three floors for its outpatient 
department, and extensive laboratories for chemical, physiological, and 
biological research. The surgical clinic occupies the pavilions from the 
fifth to the ninth floor, with outpatient and other facilities for the 
various surgical specialists. The operating rooms are on the tenth and 
eleventh floors. Above are six floors containing one hundred rooms for 
private patients, while the living quarters for the resident staff are on 
the six floors at the top of the building. The entire hospital has a capacity 
of approximately 1,182 beds. 

The head of each clinic, responsible for the care of patients and the 
conduct of professional services of the hospital, is also professor in charge 
of the corresponding department of the Medical College. Each clinical 
department is staffed in part by teachers and clinicians, including the 
professor in charge, who devote their entire time to the service of the 
College and Hospital, while other members of these departments devote 
part of their time to private practice. 

OTHER HOSPITALS FOR CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

Although the clinical teaching is conducted largely in the New York 
Hospital, advantage is also taken of special facilities afforded by other 
hospitals. In some of these hospitals the staff appointments are controlled 
by the Medical College, while in others the teaching privileges have 
been granted to the members of the staffs who are also members of the 
Medical College Faculty. 



28 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL. Bellevue is the central hospital of the New 
York City Department of Hospitals. It contains 3,325 beds and is devoted 
to the treatment of acute diseases. It is organized in four divisions, one 
of which has been placed at the disposal of the Faculty of Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College for medical instruction. The services conducted 
by the College include a medical service and a surgical service, each of 
90 beds, a urological service and a neurological service of approximately 
60 beds. The staffs of these services are nominated by the College from 
among the members of its Faculty and teaching stafT, and the Medical 
College is responsible for the professional conduct of these services. 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL. Through the generosity of the late Dr. 
James Douglas, who provided the hospital with an endowment for the 
study and treatment of cancer and allied diseases, the Memorial Hospital 
became affiliated in 1914 with Cornell University Medical College. The 
agreement between the Memorial Hospital and the College requires that 
the professional staff be named by the Council of the Medical College 
subject to the approval of the board of managers of the hospital. The 
facilities of the hospital, which are of exceptional value in the field of 
cancer, are available for study in this field by the members of the hospital 
staff, and unusual opportunities are afforded for instruction in the path- 
ology, diagnosis, and treatment of neoplastic diseases. 

MANHATTAN STATE HOSPITAL {WARD'S ISLAND). This hos- 
pital for the care and treatment of mental diseases accommodates over 
5,000 patients. Through the courtesy of the superintendent, the depart- 
ment of psychiatry is enabled to utilize this clinical material for bedside 
study of patients and for the instruction of students. 

WILLARD PARKER HOSPITAL. Instruction in infectious diseases is 
conducted at the Willard Parker Hospital, where staff positions are held 
by members of the Faculty and teaching staff who have the privilege of 
conducting medical instruction. 

LINCOLN HOSPITAL. This unit of the New York City Department of 
Hospitals has a bed capacity of 469 and facilities for handling cases in 
all divisions of clinical work. Through cooperative arrangements made 
possible by members of our teaching staff holding assignments on the 
hospital staff, a certain part of the teaching of medicine in the second 
year course is carried out on the wards of Lincoln Hospital. The abund- 
ance of clinical material and the type of disease met with in this institu- 
tion afford a valuable adjunct to the work in this part of the medical 
course. 

THE RUSSELL SAGE INSTITUTE OF PATHOLOGY 

The Institute has been associated with Cornell University Medical 
College since 1913. At first it was affiliated with the Second Medical 
(Cornell) Division of Bellevue Hospital, but since 1932 it has been in 



I 



GENERAL STATEMENT 29 

the New York Hospital. The Institute has supported work in metabolism 
which has been conducted by the members of the departments of medi- 
cine and physiology. The respiration calorimeter which was operated for 
a number of years by Dr. DuBois at Bellevue Hospital has been trans- 
ferred by the directors of the Institute of the New York Hospital and 
sufficient funds have been provided for carrying on the important meta- 
bolic studies by members of the staff. The medical director of the Insti- 
tute is Dr. David P. Barr, Professor of Medicine. 

THE LOOMIS LABORATORY 

Founded in 1886 and located at 414 East 26th Street this institution 
served the purpose of undergraduate instruction in the Medical College 
and provided facilities for original research in the various departments of 
laboratory investigation. The present Medical College building contains 
space dedicated to the original Loomis Laboratory and its established 
objectives. 

THE LIBRARY 

The reading room of the library is situated on the second floor of the 
central group of laboratoiy buildings, directly over the entrance of the 
Medical College. The current journals are kept in racks around three 
sides of the room. The book stacks are directly behind and open to the 
reading room, extending down to the subbasement with six floors of 
stacks and accommodations for about 100,000 volumes. There are also 
a library seminar room and several rooms for the library staff. 

The library contains at present over 41,000 volumes, largely made up 
of complete sets of important journals in the fields of clinical medicine 
and the medical sciences, in English, German, and French. There are 
also well-selected collections of monographs, textbooks, and reprints. 

Several of the departments of the Medical College have libraries con- 
taining journals, monographs, and textbooks pertaining especially to the 
subject matter of the departments. These serve to supplement in a useful 
way the scope of the main library. 

The library is under the direction of a committee of the Faculty and 
in charge of a trained librarian who gives instruction to students on the 
proper methods of using the library and of searching medical literature. 

A special fund, maintained in memory of Alfred Moritz Michaelis, 
M.D. 1925, Cornell, who died the year after his graduation, is used for 
the purchase of books of cultural and historic values in medicine. 

In addition to the college library, students may obtain certain priv- 
ileges at the library of the New York Academy of Medicine, Fifth Ave- 
nue and 103rd Street, the second largest medical library in the United 
States. 



Requirements for Admission 
and Graduation 



THE FACULTY of Cornell University Medical College, in defining the 
qualifications for admission to the medical profession, attaches particular 
importance to the liberal culture and general education implied by the 
acquisition of a college degree. Because of the acceleration of college 
training under the Army and Navy programs during the war, the degree 
requirement was suspended. A return to the college degree as a prerequi- 
site for acceptance has now been adopted by Faculty and Trustee action, 
and only the following candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
will be admitted to Cornell Medical College. 

1. Graduates of approved colleges or scientific schools; or 

2. Seniors in good standing in Cornell University or in any other 
approved college or scientific school whose faculty will permit them to 
substitute the first year of the professional course for the fourth year in 
arts and sciences, and who will confer upon them the Bachelor's degree 
upon the satisfactory completion of the first year of the course in the 
Cornell University Medical College. Students from institutions other than 
Cornell University seeking admission under this clause must have a 
statement from the Dean of their college signifying approval of this plan 
for fulfilling the requirements for the degree. Any student failing to 
receive his degree under this arrangement will not be admitted to the 
second year of the medical course. 

3. Persons who, while not possessing a Bachelor's degree, give evidence 
by examination that they have acquired an equivalent education and a 
training sufficient to enable them to profit by the instruction offered in 
the Medical College. This rule is intended to apply to students of foreign 
universities. 

The basic premedical requirements which all students must fulfill to 
qualify for admission to the study of medicine in New York State are set 
forth in the "Regulations of the Commissioner of Education," the pert- 
inent part of which is as follows: "A candidate shall present evidence of 
having satisfactorily completed two years of study toward a liberal arts 
degree registered by the Department; or its equivalent as determined by 
the Commissioner. The required two years of college study shall include 
at least 6 semester hours each in English, physics, biology or zoology, 
and general chemistry, and 3 semester hours in organic chemistry." 

Although the requirements outlined above form the basis of eligibility 

30 



i 



ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 31 

for admission to the medical course, they should be considered as repre- 
senting the irreducible minimum. The list contains a total of twenty- 
seven credit points which probably represents sufficient time to enable 
the student to obtain a basic preparation in these diflerent fields. In 
many colleges, however, additional credits in one or more of these de- 
partments are required of the candidate in order to satisfy major require- 
ments for the degree. In making the choice of elective courses, consider- 
ation should be given to the principle that thorough training in the 
sciences is essential. On the other hand, choosing too many elective 
courses in these departments may not provide the most acceptable prep- 
aration for medicine, since it tends to limit the time available for study 
in other departments offering work of a broad educational value. 
Students planning to study medicine should bear in mind that bacteri- 
ology, immunology, human physiology, and abnormal psychology are 
properly subjects of the medical and not of the premedical curriculum. 
In planning premedical work students are advised to elect subjects which 
will lay a broad foundation for medical study rather than to anticipate 
courses required as a part of the medical curriculum. 

Each year the Admissions Committee selects an entering class of about 
85 students from a group of more than 1,500 applicants. The members of 
the committee are keenly aware of their serious responsibility in selecting 
students who have the native ability, traits of character, soundness of per- 
sonality, and adequate financial responsibility that will enable them to 
finish satisfactorily their course in the Medical College. A serious obliga- 
tion to society is also acknowledged by a medical school. It must graduate 
only those persons who can be expected, with reasonable certainty, to do 
creditable work in some field of medicine after graduation. The Admis- 
sions Committee selects from all the applicants those who seem best to 
fulfill such requirements. 

In selecting a relatively small class from a large group of well qualified 
applicants, the Committee is mindful of the sound and liberal traditions 
of Cornell University. They attempt to select well qualified students with 
varied backgrounds — from various geographic areas, from different socio- 
economic groups, and from vaiying types of educational institutions. As to 
grade averages, the Committee needs to satisfy itself that the applicant's 
scholastic record, both as to courses taken and grades received, gives 
reasonable assurance that the individual can do the medical curricular 
work without undue difficulty. Grading systems vary so much from school 
to school that no specific grade can be categorically stated as minimally 
acceptable. To be accepted for admission a student must have a satisfac- 
tory scholastic record. Beyond that, grades are considered less important 
than the personal attributes — emotional stability, sound character, healthy 
personality, intellectual maturity, strong motivation, and ability to co- 
operate. The Medical College Admission Test results are helpful in 



32 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

appraising an applicant's academic ability. No one pattern of extra- 
curricular activities is considered more meritorious than another. The 
Admissions Committee looks at each applicant as a total individual, inso- 
far as that is possible with the information obtainable. Those applicants 
are considered acceptable who have the qualities, abilities, and capabili- 
ties considered necessary in a person who hopes to become a physician. 
As a general rule the courses given in professional schools of pharmacy, 
veterinary medicine, optometry, and agriculture and the like are not 
considered as fulfilling adequately the admission requirements. 

APPLICATIONS FOR ADMISSION 

All requests for application forms and inquiries regarding dates for 
submitting applications should be addressed to the Committee on Admis- 
sions, 1300 York Avenue, New York City. In making application for 
admission, the regular form issued for this purpose must be filled out and 
submitted to the Office of Admissions. Candidates are accepted for only 
one class in advance. With the large number of students making appli- 
cation in recent years, it has been necessary to assign a definite period 
for distributing application forms. For a class entering in September of 
a certain year, the application forms may be obtained on request begin- 
ning August 1 of the previous year. Applications should be completed 
during the fall, and no application will be accepted after January 15. 

A charge of $5 is made for submitting an application. This fee should 
be made payable to Cornell University Medical College in the form of 
a check or money order and is not returnable. 

Applications are passed upon by the Committee on Admissions after 
all credentials have been filed. As soon as the Committee takes favorable 
action upon an applicant, a letter of acceptance is immediately forwarded 
to him, and the accepted applicant is required to make a deposit of $50 
within a specified time. This deposit is not returnable but is credited 
toward the first tuition payment. If the accepted student fails to make 
this deposit within the stipulated time, he forfeits his place on the class 
roll. 

It is impossible for the Committee on Admissions to hold personal 
conferences with all candidates for admission as the number is too great, 
but selected individuals from the group of applicants receive an in\'ita- 
tion to appear before members of the Committee. 

A student who has previously attended another medical school and 
has been dropped for poor scholarship or unfavorable conduct is not an 
acceptable candidate for admission to any class in Cornell Medical Col- 
lege. It is inadvisable, therefore, for one with this background to go 
through the formality of submitting an application. 



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ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 



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34 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

When vacancies occur, students may be admitted to advanced standing. 

Application for a place in one of the upper classes should be filed 
according to the procedure described for admission to the first year class. 
Accepted applicants are required to make the deposit of $50. Applicants 
must not only furnish acceptable evidence of having satisfactorily com- 
pleted in an approved medical school all of the work required of students 
of the class they wish to enter, but also of having completed the condi- 
tions of admission to the first year class at Cornell University Medical 
College. They must present a certificate of honorable dismissal from the 
medical school or schools they have attended, and they may be required 
to take examinations in any of the medical courses taken at another 
school. 

Although a certain number of students are regularly admitted from 
other institutions to enter the third year class at Cornell University Medi- 
cal College, rarely have there been acceptances made of students to enter 
the fourth year on the basis of work at another medical school. Candi- 
dates seeking admission to the fourth year are required to come before 
the clinical departments for a thorough examination before final action 
is taken on their applications. 

Persons who have received the degree of Doctor of Medicine at an- 
other institution will not be accepted as candidates for this degree at 
Cornell University Medical College. Likewise, persons who have finished 
all or part of the course in dentistry and seek a transfer to medicine are 
discouraged from making application here since Cornell does not have 
a department of dentistry and makes no provision for adapting the teach- 
ing in this subject to the medical curriculum. 

ADVANCEMENT AND EXAMINATION 

The entire medical curriculum is arranged in four courses, or academic 
years, and the student advances in steps of an academic year at a time. 
It is necessary that he complete all the subjects listed in a given academic 
year before taking up the next succeeding group of subjects, and to be 
readmitted to the Medical College in one of the advanced years (second, 
third, or fourth) he must be approved for promotion by the Faculty. 

Any student who by quality of work or conduct indicates an unfitness 
to enter the profession of medicine may, at the discretion of the Faculty, 
be required at any time to withdraw from the Medical College. 

At the close of the academic year examinations are given in all subjects 
except those extending through a part of the year only, in which exam- 
inations may be held at the close of the course in the hours allotted there- 
to. In making up a student's rating in a given course, all work covered 
in that subject during the year is taken into account and due weight 
assigned to the effort he puts in his work, his seriousness of purpose, and 



ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 35 

his scholastic resourcefulness, as well as the results of the final examina- 
tion. 

A final rating is made for each student at the end of the academic 
year, based on the results of his performance in all courses in the cur- 
riculum of that year. These final ratings of students are made on the 
recommendations of the Committee on Promotion and Graduation; then 
they are reviewed and formally acted on by the Faculty. The Faculty 
ratings classify all students of the medical course under one of four 
groups as follows: 

1. Students with no encumbrances in any subject are recorded as 
"passed." This rating confers eligibility for readmission into the Medical 
College in the next higher class, unless by reason of conduct the Faculty 
considers the student unsuited for the medical profession. 

2. Students with an unsatisfactory rating in 40 per cent or more of 
the required hours in a given year are recorded as "not passed." A rating 
of "not passed" carries ineligibility for readmission into the Medical 
College. 

3. Students with an unsatisfactory rating in less than 40 per cent of 
the required hours of a given year are recorded as "conditioned." A 
"conditioned" student has failures in certain required courses, and he 
may be reexamined in these subjects, but only after pursuing additional 
work under the direction of the head of the department in ^vhich a 
failure has occurred. Students who fail on reexaminations are ineligible 
for readmission into the Medical College, unless under special circum- 
stances they are permitted by the Faculty to repeat courses in which their 
work is deficient. 

4. Students with uniformly low grades in most subjects of the course 
for two years or more are subject to special review by the Faculty, and 
any student with a record of this kind may be deemed unqualified to 
enter the medical profession. A rating in this group carries ineligibility for 
readmission into the Medical College. 

It is a well-established policy of the Medical College to make no an- 
nouncement to students of grades received in any subject of the medical 
course. At the close of each academic year, however, students are in- 
formed of the quarter of the class in which their weighted average score 
places them in the order of class standing. 

A transcript of the Medical College record of a student or graduate 
will be mailed on his request to accredited hospitals and to educational 
or other well-recognized institutions as credentials in support of his ap- 
plication for a position or promotion. All transcripts are marked "con- 
fidential" and carry the instructions that they are not to be turned over 
to the candidate. This ruling is for the purpose of avoiding possible loss 
and fraudulent use of an official document of the Medical College. The 
Medical College makes no charge for sending out transcripts of record. 



36 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine must have at- 
tained the age of twenty-one years and be of good moral character. 

They must have completed successfully four full courses of at least 
eight months each as regular matriculated medical students, the last of 
which must have been in Cornell University Medical College. They must 
have satisfactorily completed all the required work of the medical cur- 
riculum and must have passed all prescribed examinations. At the end 
of the fourth year every student who has fulfilled these requirements will 
be recommended to the President and Trustees of Cornell University for 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

EXAMINATIONS FOR MEDICAL LICENSURE 

Graduates of Cornell University Medical College are admitted uncon- 
ditionally to the examinations for license to practice medicine in all 
states of the United States. 

Students and graduates of Cornell University Medical College are ad- 
mitted to the examinations of the National Board of Medical Exam- 
iners, whose certificate is recognized by the respective authorities of Eng- 
land, Scotland, and Ireland. Although national in scope and organized 
under the laws of the District of Columbia, the National Board of Med- 
ical Examiners is not be confused as a federal government agency. For 
information write to the National Board of Medical Examiners, 225 
South Fifteenth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



General Information 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

ALL FEES for instruction and other charges are paid at the Business 
Office of the Medical College, Room F-106, 1300 York Avenue, New 
York21, N.Y. 

Veterans receiving federal or state educational benefits are required 
to report to the Veterans Affairs Office, Room A-131, immediately after 
registering. 

The Board of Trustees of Cornell University reserves the right to 
change the schedule of fees of the Medical College when deemed expe- 
dient. 

APPLICATION FEE 

A charge made for reviewing an application . . . . $ 5.00 

ACCEPTANCE DEPOSIT 50.00 

Each student admitted is given notice of favorable action on 
his application and a limited time (usually two weeks) in 
which to decide if he will enroll in the entering class. His name 
is not placed on the class list until the acceptance fee is paid. 
The fee is credited toward the tuition charge and is not return- 
able if the student fails to enter. 

M^r/?/C^L^r/OA^F£'£ (payable only once) 10.00 

TUITION FEE, for academic year 900.00 

This charge is payable at the beginning of the academic year, 
or in three equal parts, the first of which must be made at 
registration. For fourth year students in the academic year of 
1952-53, the first installment will be due on or before Septem- 
ber 14. No refund or rebate will be made in any instance. 

STUDENT HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE, for calen- 
dar year 19.20 

This insurance is carried through the Associated Hospital Serv- 
ice (Blue Cross plan) and may be extended to wives and fam- 
ilies of married students at additional cost. This compulsory 
insurance plan assures a limited period of care to all students 
during the time they are members in good standing in the 
Medical College. 

37 



38 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

BREAKAGE DEPOSIT 10.00 

This deposit is required of first and second year students at the 
beginning of each academic year and will be returned, less the 
amount charged for breakage, at the end of the second year. 

GRADUATION FEE 25.00 

This charge is payable two months before graduation. 

BOOKS AND INSTRUMENTS, EXCLUSIVE OF MICROSCOPES 

The average cost is approximately $110 a year, distributed as follows: 
first year, $140; second year, $215; third year, $50; fourth year, $30. 

MICROSCOPES 

Each student is required to provide himself with a microscope of an 
approved type. The College Book Store handles all makes, and students 
placing their orders here are given every consideration in the purchase 
price on the instrument they select. 

RESIDENCE AND LIVING EXPENSES 

Accommodations are available for 220 students in temporary quarters 
pending completion of a student residence. In these facilities the rooms 
are ample in size, and each provides space to accommodate two students. 
The location is within one block of the Medical College. The rental rate 
is $200.00 per academic year per student, payable in three equal parts. 
Applications may be made for room reservations at the time of accept- 
ance to enter the Medical College. 

Cafeterias in the Medical College and the New York Hospital afTord 
facilities for students to obtain well-balanced meals at a conservatively 
low price in comparison with New York City costs. 

For students planning to take up the study of medicine, the problem 
of financing the course is often a difficult one to solve. Although experi- 
ence in the undergraduate college may suggest the possibility of supple- 
menting resources by carrying on outside work during the medical course, 
there is ample evidence to show that a student's entire time and undi- 
vided attention are required for study. It is unwise, therefore, to depend 
upon earning any part of one's expenses during the college year. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Members of the first year class and students transferred to advanced 
standing from other colleges are required to have a physical examination 
by a member of the Student Health Staff. In addition, each student in 
the Medical College must report once a year for an X-ray examination 
of the lungs. All members of the fourth year class are called for a reex- 
amination and a careful check of the findings made with those presented 
at the time the student entered. Students pay no fee for the yearly X-ray 



GENERAL INFORMATION 39 

examination, nor for the services of the Student Health Staff, but they 
are charged for any special X-ray studies. Office hours are held from 
twelve to two o'clock daily by the Student Health Staff. Health records 
are kept and students advised concerning their physical condition and 
general health. All cases of illness must be reported to the College office. 
Students may have in attendance physicians of their own choice, but a 
reasonable amount of cooperation between such physicians and the Col- 
lege's Health Service is expected. 

PRIZES 

1. FOR GENERAL EFFICIENCY. In commemoration of John Met- 
calfe Polk, an instructor in this college who was graduated from Cornell 
University Medical College June 7, 1899, and died on March 29, 1904, 
prizes will be presented at each commencement to the three students 
having the highest standing for the four years' work. Only those who 
have taken the full course of study at Cornell University Medical College 
are eligible. The first prize is $250, the second $100, and the third $50. 

2. FOR EFFICIENCY IN OPHTHALMOLOGY. Two prizes, the 
first of $50, and the second of $25, are offered by Professor Bernard Samuels 
to the two students of the graduating class who make the best records in 
ophthalmology. 

3. FOR EFFICIENCY IN OTOLARYNGOLOGY. Two prizes, the 
first of $50, and the second of $25, are offered by members of the staff of 
otolaryngology to the two students of the graduating class who make 
the best record in this specialty. 

4. FOR EFFICIENCY IN OBSTETRICS. Two prizes, the first of 
$50, the second of $25, have been endowed by an anonymous donor in 
recognition of the work of Dr. Gustav Seeligman, in obstetrics, to be 
given to the two students of the graduating class who have made the best 
records in obstetrics. 

5. FOR EFFICIENCY IN GENERAL MEDICINE. The income 
from $1,000 is offered as a prize for general efficiency in the department 
of medicine, in commemoration of Alfred Moritz Michaelis, who was 
graduated from Cornell University Medical College on June 11, 1925, 
and who died during his internship at Mt. Sinai Hospital, April 24, 1926. 
Presented at each commencement to a member of the graduating class 
who has pursued the full course at Cornell University Medical College. 

6. THE MARY ALDRICH FUND. In memory of William Mecklen- 
burg Polk, M.D., LL.D., first dean of the Medical College, two prizes 
are offered for proficiency in research to regularly matriculated students 
of the Cornell University Medical College, the first of $150, and the 
second of $50. Members of all classes are eligible for these prizes. 

The awards are made at the end of each academic year for the best 
report presented in writing of research work done by students, or for 
valuable reviews and logical presentations on medical subjects not to 



40 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

be found fully considered in a single text or reference book. If the papers 
submitted are not considered worthy of special commendation the prizes 
will be withheld. 

Papers are submitted in quadruplicate in a sealed envelope marked 
"Dean William Mecklenburg Polk Memorial Prize Committee" and 
must be in the Administration Office not later than three weeks prior to 
the end of each academic year. 

The committee of awards for this prize consists of two members of 
the Faculty from laboratory departments and two from clinical depart- 
ments. 

For 1952 the William Mecklenburg Polk Prize awards for research 
were: first prize: George Seamon Shields; second prize: Peter Peter 
Poulos and John Rudolf Langstadt. 

7. THE WILLIAM C. THRO MEMORIAL FUND. Established in 
memory of William C. Thro of the class of 1901 whose all-absorbing 
interest in and devotion to clinical pathology found expression in the 
teaching and practice of this subject in his alma mater continuously from 
1910 to 1938. This prize award is to be given to the student showing the 
best record in the course in clinical pathology. The candidate for the 
prize is to be recommended by the professor of clinical pathology and 
the award made by the Committee on Prizes and Scholarships. 

8. THE HERMAN L. JACOBIUS PRIZE IN PATHOLOGY. Es- 
tablished in 1945 by a gift from Dr. Lawrence Jacobius and his friends 
in memory of his son who was killed in action in the Netherlands on 
September 28, 1944. Dr. Herman L. Jacobius was a member of the class 
of 1939. The income of the fund is available annually to the student of 
the third or fourth year class who, in the opinion of the staff of the de- 
partment of pathology, merits recognition for high scholastic attainments 
and outstanding performance in the subject of pathology. If in any year 
no student merits the distinction the award will be withheld. 

9. THE BORDEN UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH AWARD. 
The terms of this grant by The Borden Company Foundation, Inc., pro- 
vide for awards of $500 during any one calendar year for a period of 
five years. The award will be made under the following terms and con- 
ditions : 

1. All persons in the graduating class of the Medical College of Cornell Univer- 
sity who, during any year while enrolled in the College, have carried out under- 
graduate research in the medical field shall be eligible for the Borden Undergrad- 
uate Research Award in Medicine. The award shall be presented at the time of 
his graduation to that eligible person whose research has been determined by the 
Medical College to be the most meritorious performed by all similarly eligible 
persons. Originality and thoroughness of research shall be of primary consideration. 

2. In the event that the Dean shall find it inappropriate to make the award in 
any one year, the award may be deferred to a further year. Only one award, 
however, will be made during any one calendar year. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 41 

Papers submitted for this prize should be in triplicate and must be in 
the Administration Office not later than three weeks before the end of 
the term. 

The Borden Prize for Research for the year 1952 was awarded to 
John Weldon Bellville. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

1. THE JOHN METCALFE POLK SCHOLARSHIP. A gift under 
the will of William Mecklenburg Polk, the first Dean of the Medical 
College, is awarded annually by the Faculty. The scholarship amounts 
to about $200 a year. 

2. THE THORNE SHAW SCHOLARSHIP FUND. This fund pro- 
vides three scholarships designated as: 

First: A scholarship of approximately $400 available to students after 

at least two years of study in the Medical College. 
Second: Two scholarships of approximately $200 each available to 

students after at least one year of study in the Medical College. 
These scholarships are awarded by the Faculty upon nomination by 
the Committee on Scholarships and Prizes. They are awarded annually 
in June and are for one year only. Students receiving the scholarships are 
notified of the award at the end of the session. 

3. MARY F. HALL SCHOLARSHIP. The income, amounting to 
about $180 annually, from a fund established by bequest of Miss Mary F. 
Hall, is available to any woman student in Cornell University Medical 
College who needs its aid and who is a bona fide resident of the State of 
New York and was such prior to admission to the College. 

4. THE 1936 JOHN AND KATHERINE MAYER SCHOLARSHIP 
FUND. A five thousand dollar fund established in 1936, the income from 
which is annually available to meritorious students who need its aid, and 
who have completed one or more years of the regular medical course. 
The award is for one year only, but tenable for a second or third year 
providing the qualifications of the candidate merit a reaward. If during 
any year the income from the fund is not used as stated above, then it 
may be used for such research work, or otherwise, as in the judgment of 
the Faculty (or Trustees) may be deemed best. 

5. THE 1939 JOHN AND KATHERINE MAYER SCHOLARSHIP 
FUND. A five thousand dollar fund established in 1939, the income from 
which is annually available to meritorious students who need its aid, and 
who have completed one or more years of the regular medical course. 
The award is for one year only, but tenable for a second or third year 
providing the qualifications of the candidate merit a reaward. If during 
any year the income from the fund is not used as stated above, then it 
may be used for such research work, or otherwise, as in the judgment of 
the Faculty (or Trustees) may be deemed best. 



42 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

6. THE JEREMIAH S, FERGUSON SCHOLARSHIP. Established 
in memory of Jeremiah S. Ferguson, who throughout his long connection 
with the Medical College, of somewhat more than forty years, devoted 
much effort to helping students with their individual problems and pro- 
moting their professional careers. The fund amounts to $5000, the income 
from which, approximately $200 a year, is awarded annually by the Com- 
mittee on Scholarships and Prizes to a student or students in the third 
and fourth year classes in the Medical College who are in need of finan- 
cial aid and who by conduct and scholarship have proved worthy invest- 
ments. 

7. THE CHARLES RUPERT STOCK ARD SCHOLARSHIP. A ten 
thousand dollar fund was established in 1939 by a friend of the late 
Charles Rupert Stockard, Professor of Anatomy in the Cornell Univer- 
sity Medical College, 1911-39. The interest of this fund is to be awarded 
either to one student (approximately $400) or to two students (ap- 
proximately $200 each) who have shown promise in the work in the de- 
partment of anatomy and who are desirous of doing advanced work in 
this department. The scholarships are to be awarded by the Executive 
Faculty upon nomination by the head of the department of anatomy. 

8. THE DR. JOHN A. HEIM SCHOLARSHIPS. Established under 
the will of John A. Heim of the class of 1905 to provide such number of 
scholarships in the Medical College as there shall be funds available for 
that purpose. The awards are to be made to regularly matriculated med- 
ical students who are in need of financial assistance, as provided for in 
the terms of the bequest. 

First year students are eligible, provided they meet the standards pre- 
scribed. 

9. THE DR. CHARLES I. HYDE '10 AND EVA HYDE SCHOL- 
ARSHIP FUND. Established in memory of their daughter, Anita Shirley 
Hyde. The terms of this endowment provide that the income be available 
annually to meritorious students who have completed one year of the 
regular medical course and are in need of assistance. It is further stipu- 
lated by the donors that the scholarship be available at once; that they 
propose to subscribe $75 annually for this purpose until such time as the 
terms of the bequest become effective; and that if during any year the 
income from the fund shall not be used for scholarship purposes, the 
same may be used for research work or otherwise as may be determined 
by the Board of Trustees after consultation by the President of the Uni- 
versity and the Dean of the College. 

10. THE DR. JACQUES SAPHIER SCHOLARSHIP FUND. Es- 
tablished in memory of Dr. Jacques Conrad Saphier (Lieutenant, j.g., 
USNR) of the class of 1940, who was killed in action on August 21, 
1942, at Guadalcanal while in the performance of his duty. The income 
from this fund shall be awarded annually to a meritorious student of the 






GENERAL INFORMATION 43 

Cornell University Medical College who has completed at least one 
year of work, who needs its aid, and who, in the opinion of the Faculty 
merits the recognition for which this scholarship was established. 

11. THE ELISE STRANG UESPERANCE SCHOLARSHIP. This 
award is maintained by the personal contributions of Dr. EHse Strang 
L'Esperance, whose interests in the educational advancements of the 
Medical College have continued for many years. The value of this schol- 
arship is $1,000, and the award is to be given annually to the most out- 
standing woman medical student in the fourth year class in Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College. The selection of the recipient of this scholarship 
is to be made by the Dean in consultation with persons suggested under 
the original donation. 

12. THE SAGAN FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP. An annual 
scholarship of $500 to be awarded to a student in Cornell University 
Medical College, to be selected by the College on the basis of scholarship 
and need, without reference to race, color, sex, or creed. In the event the 
Foundation should discontinue the award, at least one year's notice shall 
be given the Medical College. A special blank issued by the Sagan Foun- 
dation should be obtained from the Dean's Office by students making ap- 
plication for this scholarship. 

13. RUTH HOLLOHAN SCHOLARSHIP FUND. This fund was 
established by the terms of the will of Jessie L. Hollohan in memory of 
Ruth Hollohan. The income is to be used for scholarships for students 
in the Medical College, with first consideration to be given to entering 
students of good scholarship who are in need of financial assistance. 

14. PFIZER SCHOLARSHIP FUND FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS. 
This scholarship fund, amounting to $1,000, has been established by 
Charles Pfizer & Co., Inc. This fund may be divided among no more than 
three students to help defray the cost of tuition, books, and living ex- 
penses. It is to be awarded to first or second year students. 

BURSARY FOR WOMEN STUDENTS 

THE MARIE AND JOHN ZIMMERMAN FUND. A sum from this 
fund will be available this year to certain women students as a memorial 
to Marie Zimmerman, Sr. The candidates will be chosen in accordance 
with the purposes of the donor as set forth in the following terms: 

"It is the desire of the Fund that Dr. Connie M. Guion and the As- 
sistant Dean assign the proceeds of the donations to one or more women 
medical students who are financially in need of assistance and whose 
academic standing leads them to believe that the recipients of the awards 
will make a success in their profession.'* 

The objectives and method of assigning these awards will follow the 
principles accompanying the donations received during the present year. 



44 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

LOAN FUNDS 

L THE 1923 LOAN FUND. The income from this fund amounts to 
$350 a year and is available as a loan to students needing financial assist- 
ance, preferably to a third year student. 

2. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION LOAN FUNDS. The Alumni Associa- 
tion of the Medical College is able to aid a few students in meeting their 
expenses by the Jessie P. Andresen Memorial Fund and the Class Student 
Loan Funds. The loans made from these funds will be administered by 
the Board of Directors of the Alumni Association. The Medical College 
is consulted in making these awards. Students in the upper classes will be 
given preference. 

3. STUDENT LOAN FUND. A revolving fund contributed through 
different sources including The Kellogg Foundation, The Charles Hay- 
den Foundation, and the Student Book Store is available to students in 
all classes who are in need of assistance. Every effort is made within the 
limitations of the financial structure of the institution to help students 
who by reason of unforeseen circumstances get into money difficulties. A 
special committee considers each case on its individual merits. A student 
having indebtedness to the Medical College in other ways than formal 
loans is ineligible for graduation. 

ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA 

Alpha Omega Alpha is a nonsecret Medical College Honor Society, 
membership in which is based upon scholarship, moral qualifications be 
ing satisfactory. It was organized at the College of Medicine of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, Chicago, August 25, 1902. A.O.A. is the only order of 
its kind on this continent. 

Elections are made from students who have fully completed two years 
of a four year curriculum, by unanimous vote of the active members 
acting on recommendations made by Faculty advisers. Not more than 
one-sixth of any class may be elected. As aspects of and indispensable to 
true scholarship are included open-mindedness, individuality, originality, 
demonstration of studious attitude, and promise of intellectual growth. 

The Cornell Chapter of A.O.A. was organized May 2, 1910. A large 
number of the Faculty are members. The Chapter sponsors an annual 
open lecture delivered in the Medical College Auditorium on a cultural 
or historical phase of medicine. 

The members elected from the graduating class of 1952 are the follow- 
ing: Julius J. Baber, Louis Bove, John W. Bromley, William Cooper, 
James C. Gammill, Leston L. Havens, Martin D. Keller, Thomas Killip, 
III, David N. Niceberg, Burton Rubin, Edwin Sevringhaus, Lewis Shenk- 
er, Peter E. Stokes. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 45 

SIGMA XI 

Sigma Xi, a national honorary society devoted to the encouragement 
of scientific research, was founded at Cornell University at Ithaca in 
1886. An active branch of the Cornell Chapter is maintained at the Med- 
ical College. Many members of the Faculty and research staff are mem- 
bers of Sigma Xi and share in the activities of the Cornell Chapter. 
Medical students are eligible for election to membership in Sigma Xi on 
the basis of proved ability to carry on original medical research and on 
nomination by active members of the Cornell Chapter. As part of its 
program for the encouragement of medical research, the Cornell Chapter 
sponsors an annual lecture to the staff and student body by an outstand- 
ing investigator in the field of medical science. 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Officers 

Nelson W. Cornell, '21 President 

Irving S. Wright, '26 Vice President 

Mary Ann Payne, '45 Secretary 

Henry A, Carr, '25 Treasurer 

Directors 
Three Year Term: Paul Reznikoflf, '20; Connie M. Guion, '17. 
Two Year Term: William H. Cassebaum, '31; Alphonse E. Tim- 
panelli, '36. 

One Year Term: Horace S. Baldwin, '21; Edward V. Denneen, '25. 

Alumni Quarterly 
David N. Barrows, '12 Editor 

Willis M. Weeden, '19 Associate Editor 

Edward F. Stanton, '35 Associate Editor 

Miss Mary E. Gleason Executive Secretary 

Each graduate of Cornell University Medical College is automatically 
considered a member of the Alumni Association, and the dues are $5 a 
year. The activities of the Association include a quarterly publication, an 
annual banquet, student and faculty parties, student loan funds, and an 
employment bureau. The Association maintains an office at 1300 York 
Avenue. 

An annual appeal for funds for the use of the Medical College is made 
to members of the Association. 



Educational Policies 
and Plan of Instruction 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE is divided into twelve major departments, 

seven of which are primarily concerned with the sciences underlying 
clinical medicine. They are anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, bacteriol- 
ogy and immunology, pathology, pharmacology, and public health and 
preventive medicine. Five departments have as their major functions the 
study, treatment, and prevention of human diseases, and maternity care. 
These are medicine, surgery, pediatrics, psychiatry, and obstetrics and 
gynecology. 

The heads of these major departments, together with the President of 
the University and the Dean, constitute the Executive Faculty, which is 
responsible for the educational policies of the College. 

Courses required to be completed by each student before the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine is conferred by Cornell University are offered by each 
department. These courses are arranged, in their sequence and duration, 
to develop logically the knowledge and training of students and to build 
up gradually the requirements needed for graduation as Doctor of Medi- 
cine. The various departments also offer courses and opportunities for 
special study open to regular medical students, to candidates for ad- 
vanced degrees in the Graduate School of Cornell University, and to 
qualified advanced students of medicine not candidates for degrees. 

Medical knowledge is so extensive that only a small part of that needed 
for a successful career in medicine can be acquired during the time de- 
voted to medical study by the medical college curriculum. The time de- 
voted by the prospective physician to his preparation for the practice of 
medicine includes at least one and often many more years of graduate 
medical education as intern or resident of a hospital, either in clinical or 
laboratory work or both. The required period of study at Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College extends over four academic years of at least 
thirty-three weeks each. 

As medical science and medical practice may be pursued in a variety 
of ways, it is the policy of the College to encourage the student to vary 
his course of study according to his special interests and particular talents 
as far 35 is consistent with meeting the requirements for the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. 

A thesis is not required for the degree of Doctor of Medicine, but 
students are encouraged to engage in individual work as far as their time 

46 



POLICIES AND INSTRUCTION 47 

permits, with the hope that they may accomplish results worthy of publi- 
cation. It is desirable, therefore, for some students to devote all their free 
time to a single subject in which they have a special interest. 

The development of technical and scientific proficiency in the various 
special fields of chnical medicine is not encouraged during the regular 
medical course but must await adequate training after graduation. 

The first year of study is devoted to anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, 
bacteriology, and psychobiology. 

In the second year, the subjects of physiology and bacteriology are 
completed, and the student takes up work in parasitology, pathology, 
pharmacology, physical diagnosis, psychiatry, neurology, clinical path- 
ology, public health, ophthalmology, radiology, and surgery. 

During the third and fourth years, students are divided into small 
groups for practical work in the various clinics and for elective work. 
The third year class meets at noon each day for clinical lectures and 
demonstrations. 

Time for elective work is provided in the fourth year, after students 
have had opportunities to acquire some knowledge of the medical sci- 
ences and of clinical medicine. Students are advised to consult informally 
members of the Faculty in regard to the use of their time for elective 
work. It is deemed best not to establish a formal advisory system. 

The Faculty expressly reserves the right to make alterations in the 
curriculum whenever advisable and without previous notice to students. 



Description of Courses 



ANATOMY 

JOSEPH C. HINSEY, Professor of Anatomy. 

CHARLES V. MORRILL, Professor of Anatomy. 

CHARLES M. BERRY, Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

JOHN MacLeod, Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

WILLL\M A. GEOHEGAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Anatomy. 

THEODORE C. GREENE, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

LAWRENCE W. HANLON, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

ERNEST W. LAMPE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Anatomy. 

JOHN F. SEYBOLT, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

DAVID ANDERSON, Instructor in Anatomy. 

WILBUR D. HAGAMEN, Instructor in Anatomy. 

IRENA KOPROWSKA, Research Fellow in Anatomy. 

EMBRYOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY ... The work in embryology pre- 
supposes a general knowledge of the subject, particularly that of the 
early development of the chick. It embraces a thorough study of the de- 
velopment of the mammalian embryo in the light of our knowledge of 
the evolution of the human body. Malformations resulting from develop- 
mental disturbances are broadly considered. The course is closely cor- 
related with that of gross anatomy. 

The work in histology includes the histogenesis and microscopic struc- 
tures of all organs of the human body with the exception of the central 
nervous system (see Neuroanatomy). Emphasis is laid on relation of 
structure to function. 

The tissues are studied principally by means of stained sections and 
practice is given in rapid identification of their diagnostic features. Dem- 
onstrations of living material are made, and opportunities are offered for 
acquiring the essentials of histological technique. 

Laboratory and lectures, 180 hours, first and second terms. Required 
of all first year students. 

NEUROANATOMY ... A laboratory course on the gross and micro- 
scopic anatomy of the human nervous system. Special emphasis is laid 
on the more important pathways and their functions. 

Laboratory and demonstrations, 84 hours. Required of all first year 
students during the second term. 

GROSS ANATOMY OF THE HUMAN BODY . . . This is taught by 
means of laboratory exercises and dissections. The required work in- 

48 



ANATOMY 49 

eludes: (a) dissection of the part; (b) demonstrations, study, and dis- 
cussion upon dissected and prepared specimens. 

Total laboratory hours, 374. First and second terms of the first year. 
Required of all first year students. 

ELECTIVE COURSES . . . Subject to the approval of the department 
of anatomy, its equipment is available to medical students wishing to 
pursue advanced work or research in anatomical subjects. Members of 
the staff will direct the progress of such undertakings. Schedules to fit 
individual cases will be arranged for a limited number of third and 
fourth year students who may devote the major part or all of their elec- 
tive time in this department. Such elective time may be devoted to one 
of the following: (1) a review of dissection; (2) dissection of a foetus; 
(3) microscopic anatomy; (4) embryology; (5) special research prob- 
lems. 

COURSES OPEN TO SPECIAL STUDENTS 

GROSS ANATOMY ... A limited number of graduates in medicine 
will be provided with material for dissection of the human body. Fee, 
$50 for a term of ten weeks; or for entire dissection, $100. 

COURSE IN SURGICAL ANATOMY . . . This course consists of an 
extensive review of surgical anatomy with demonstrations and dissections. 
It is specially designed for candidates for the American Board of Surgery 
and is in charge of Dr. Ernest W. Lampe. The fee for the course, which 
includes matriculation, registration charges, and tuition, is $200, and 
the course will be for a period of four weeks. The size of the class is 
limited to 25 persons. Inquiries may be directed to Office of the Dean, 
Cornell University Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York 21, 
N.Y. 

COURSE IN CYTOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS OF CANCER . . . This 
course consists of training in the technique and interpretation of smears 
prepared from various body fluids, with discussions and laboratory work. 
It is designed for qualified physicians and laboratory workers. The teach- 
ing is done by Dr. George N. Papanicolaou and associates. The fee for 
the course, including tuition, matriculation, and administration charges, 
is $300. One course of three months will be given this year, beginning in 
March. The size of the classes is limited to 15 persons. Inquiries may be 
directed to Dr. John F. Seybolt, Cornell University Medical College, 
1300 York Avenue, New York 21, N.Y. 

ANATOMICAL RESEARCH . . . Subject to special arrangement with 
the head of the department. 



BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 

JAMES M. NEILL, Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. 
EDWARD J. HEHRE, Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. 
JOHN Y. SUGG, Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. 
, Instructor in Bacteriology and Immunology. 

The course is given in the third term of the first year and in the first 
term of the second year. Emphasis is placed upon the aspects of micro- 
biology and immunology that are pertinent to an understanding of the 
infectious diseases. 

FIRST YEAR . . . The laboratory work includes a survey of represent- 
ative morphological groups of pathogenic bacteria, a study of the mi- 
crobial flora of the upper respiratory and lower intestinal tracts of 
healthy persons, and experiments on the mechanisms involved in antigen- 
antibody reactions. The lectures are directed toward the establishment 
of general concepts, particularly the principles involved in microbial 
growth, the principles underlying active immunization, and the factors 
that enter into host-parasite relationships. 
Lectures and laboratory: 55 hours. 

SECOND YEAR ... In this term a more intensive study is made of the 
agents of specific infections, including fungi, spirochetes, rickettsiae, and 
viruses, as well as bacteria. General concepts introduced in the first term 
are further developed by applying them to the specific diseases. Labora- 
tory work with material from patients is inckided, not only to acquaint 
the student with the technical procedures, but to illustrate the applica- 
tion of fundamental principles to practical methods. The action of chem- 
otherapeutic agents, especially those of microbial origin, are considered. 
Lectures, laboratory, and conference: 88 hours. 

ELECTIVE COURSES . . . The department will arrange a schedule 
of work for fourth year students who wish to devote their elective time 
to microbiology and immunology. 



I 



50 



BIOCHEMISTRY 

VINCENT Du VIGNEAUD, Professor of Biochemistry. 
ROY W. BONSNES, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 
DONALD B. MELVILLE, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 
JULIAN R. RACHELE, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 
HELENA GILDER, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 
DOROTHY S. GENGHOF, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 
CHARLOTTE RESSLER, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 
CARLTON W. ROBERTS, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 
MARY ELIZABETH WRIGHT, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 
STERLING TAYLOR, Instructor in Biochemistry. 
WILLIAM J. CATHEY, Fellow in Biochemistry. 
LAURANCE D. GOODWIN, Fellow in Biochemistry. 
SAMUEL GORDON, Assistant in Biochemistry. 
EDWARD J. KUCHINSKAS, Assistant in Biochemistry. 
R. CLAIRE LAWLER, Assistant in Biochemistry. 
CHARLES C. OTKEN, Assistant in Biochemistry. 

The instruction in biochemistry is concentrated in the first year and 
is arranged upon the assumption that the student is already thoroughly 
grounded in the principles of chemistry and physics. The object is to 
impart that fundamental knowledge of biochemistry which is necessary 
to the comprehension of the bearings of chemistry upon medicine. 

The schedule during the first and second terms is devoted to an inten- 
sive course in general biochemistry by means of lectures, demonstrations, 
and conferences. During the third term the instruction is centered largely 
in the laboratory and the conference room where the knowledge gained 
in the first two terms is consolidated and amplified. Considerable empha- 
sis is laid upon quantitative rather than qualitative laboratory procedures. 
Throughout these lectures the application of biochemistry to the study of 
disease and metabolic disturbances is stressed. Collateral reading in bio- 
chemical literature is encouraged. 

FIRST AND SECOND TERM . . . Lecture and conference course deal- 
ing with the chemistry and intermediary metabolism of proteins, fats, 
carbohydrates, and purines; enzymes, digestion, intestinal putrefaction, 
and feces; the composition of the tissues, blood, milk, and urine; hor- 
mones and vitamins; the elements of physical chemistry as applied to 
biology and medicine, with emphasis on the fundamental properties of 
electrolytes and colloids. 

33 hours, first term. 

33 hours, second term. 

THIRD TERM . . . Laboratory course with lectures and conferences- 
extending the work of the first two terms. 
154 hours, third term. 

51 



52 



CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 



ELECTIVE COURSES 

ADVANCED LABORATORY WORK OR RESEARCH ... By special 
arrangement. 

COURSES OPEN TO SPECIAL STUDENTS 
BIOCHEMISTRY . . . Fee, $25 a term. 

BIOCHEMICAL LITERATURE . . . Seminar course on the current 
literature in biochemistry, mainly for graduate students, but open to a 
limited number of specially qualified medical students. Hours to be ar- 
ranged. Professors du Vigneaud, Melville, and Rachele. 

BIOCHEMICAL PREPARATIONS ... A laboratory course dealing 
with the isolation, synthesis, and analysis of selected compounds of bi- 
ological importance. Hours, credits, and fees to be arranged. The Staff. 



RESEARCH IN BIOCHEMISTRY 

of the department. 



By arrangement with the head 



MEDICINE 

DAVID P. BARR, Professor of Medicine. 

LLOYD F. GRAVER, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

LOUIS HAUSMAN, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 

GEORGE M. LEWIS, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatology). 

ASA L. LINCOLN, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

PAUL REZNIKOFF, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

LEWIS D. STEVENSON, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 

HAROLD G. WOLFF, Professor of Medicine (Neurology). 

IRVING S. WRIGHT, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

THOMAS P. ALMY, James Ewing Associate Professor of Neoplastic Diseases 
(Medicine). 

HORACE S. BALDWIN, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

ANTHONY C. CIPOLLARO, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Derma- 
tology). 

*JOHN E. DEITRICK, Associate Professor of Medicine. 

HENRY S. DUNNING, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

GARY EGGLESTON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

CLAUDE E. FORKNER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

RICHARD H. FREYBERG, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

EDWIN T. HAUSER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

MARY E. H. LOVELESS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Allergy). 

WALSH McDERMOTT, Associate Professor of Medicine. 

ADE T. MILHORAT, Associate Professor of Medicine in Psychiatry. 

CARL MUSCHENHEIM, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

THEODORE E. OPPEL, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

HAROLD E. B. PARDEE, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

HENRY B. RICHARDSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

SIDNEY ROTHBARD, Associate Professor of Medicine. 

EPHRAIM SHORR, Associate Professor of Medicine. 

DONALD J. SIMONS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

HAROLD J. STEWART, Associate Professor of Medicine. 

HENRY J. TAGNON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

EDWARD TOLSTOI, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

RALPH TOMPSETT, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

ROBERT F. WATSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

BRUCE P. WEBSTER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

ANDREW J. AKELAITIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 

SILVIO BAEZ, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

KEEVE BRODMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

JACOB BUCKSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

KATHARINE BUTLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

HENRY A. CARR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

ANNE C. CARTER, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

AARON D. CHAVES, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

EUGENE J. COHEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

FRANK E. CORMIA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatology). 

PETER G. DENKER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 

*On leave of absence. 

53 



54 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

HENRY D. DIAMOND, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

HOWARD A. EDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

RALPH L. ENGLE, Jr., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

AARON FEDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

WILLIAM T. FOLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

CONSTANCE FRIESS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

WILLIAM J. GRACE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

SIDNEY M. GREENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

SUSAN J. HADLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

MILTON HELPERN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

LAWRENCE E. HINKLE, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

EVELYN HOLT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

GEORGE L. KAUER, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

B, H. KEAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Tropical Medicine), 

MARGARET KLUMP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

MILTON L. KRAMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

JOHN S. LaDUE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

LEON I. LEVINE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

SOL S. LICHTMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

E. HUGH LUCKEY, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

ABRAHAM MAZUR, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine. 

RALPH S. OVERMAN, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine. 

MARY ANN PAYNE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

NORMAN PLUMMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

GEORGE G. READER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

J. JAMES SMITH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

ISRAEL STEINBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

ARTHUR M. SUTHERLAND, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

ALPHONSE E. TIMPANELLI, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

CHARLES H. WHEELER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

BYARD WILLIAMS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

BEATRICE BERLE, Research Associate in Medicine. 

ERWIN SHEPPARD, Research Associate in Medicine. 

CLARA TORDA, Research Associate in Medicine. 

ABRAHAM A. ANTOVILLE, Instructor in Medicine. 

SAM C. ATKINSON, Instructor in Medicine. 

RUTH P. BERKELEY, Instructor in Medicine. 

LOUIS BERLIN, Instructor in Medicine. 

VERONICA C. BROWN, Instructor in Medicine. 

GRAFTON E. BURKE, Instructor in Medicine. 

EDWARD A. BURKHARDT, Instructor in Medicine. 

JEFF DAVIS, Instructor in Medicine. 

MARION DAVIS, Instructor in Medicine. 

MONROE T. DIAMOND, Instructor in Medicine. 

JOHN W. DOUGHERTY, Instructor in Medicine. 

MURRAY DWORETZKY, Instructor in Medicine. 

ROBERT E. ECKARDT, Instructor in Medicine. 

ALBERT J. ERDMANN, Jr., Instructor in Medicine. 

EMIL A. FALK, Instructor in Medicine. 

LAWRENCE FARMER, Instructor in Medicine. 

JOHN M. GIBBONS, Instructor in Medicine. 

ELSIE A. GIORGI, Instructor in Medicine. 

OSCAR E. GOLDSTEIN, Instructor in Medicine. 

KEITH O. GUTHRIE, Jr., Instructor in Medicine. ; 

LOUIS A. HAUSER, Instructor in Medicine. 



MEDICINE 55 



RICHARD J. HAVEL, Instructor in Medicine. 
DAVID S. HAYS, Instructor in Medicine. 
LEONARD L. HEIMOFF, Instructor in Medicine. 
HERMAN G. HELPERN, Instructor in Medicine. 
LAWRENCE B. HOBSON, Instructor in Medicine. 
♦EUGENE L. HORGER, Instructor in Medicine. 
ROBERT D. HUEBNER, Instructor in Medicine. 
LEIF Y. JACOBSEN, Instructor in Medicine. 
SCOTT JOHNSON, Instructor in Medicine. 
WILLIAM H. KAMMERER, Instructor in Medicine. 
LAWRENCE I. KAPLAN, Instructor in Medicine. 
HENRY B. KIRKLAND, Instructor in Medicine. 
J. VERNON KNIGHT, Instructor in Medicine. 
HERBERT KOTEEN, Instructor in Medicine. 
MICHAEL LAKE, Instructor in Medicine. 
ROGER F. LAPHAM, Instructor in Medicine. 
HAROLD L. LEDER, Instructor in Medicine. 
RICHARD E. LEE, Instructor in Medicine. 
CHARLES A. LeMAISTRE, Instructor in Medicine. 
DOROTHEA LEMCKE, Instructor in Medicine. 
ALLYN B. LEY, Instructor in Medicine. 
JERROLD S. LIEBERMAN, Instructor in Medicine. 
ROBERT M. LINTZ, Instructor in Medicine. 
♦ROBERT O. LOEBEL, Instructor in Medicine. 
DANIEL S. LUKAS, Instructor in Medicine. 
A. PARKS McCOMBS, Instructor in Medicine. 
RICHARD R. McCORMACK, Instructor in Medicine. 
JOHN F. MARCHAND, Instructor in Medicine. 
HERBERT L. MARTIN, Instructor in Medicine. 
KIRBY MARTIN, Instructor in Medicine. 
ROBERT H. MELCHIONNA, Instructor in Medicine. 
RAYMOND E. MILLER, Instructor in Medicine. 
L. MARY MOENCH, Instructor in Medicine. 
WILLIS A. MURPHY, Instructor in Medicine. 
WARREN B. NESTLER, Instructor in Medicine. 
RICHARDSON K. NOBACK, Instructor in Medicine. 
MARJORIE B. PATTERSON, Instructor in Medicine. 
R. A. REES PRITCHETT, Instructor in Medicine. 
CHARLES H. RESSLER, Instructor in Medicine. 
EDGAR A. RILEY, Instructor in Medicine. 
JACOB ROBBINS, Instructor in Medicine. 
WILLIAM C. ROBBINS, Instructor in Medicine. 
JULIUS L. ROGOFF, Instructor in Medicine. 
ALBERT L. RUBIN, Instructor in Medicine. 
JOSEPH F. SABBATINO, Instructor in Medicine. 
THERESA SCANLAN, Instructor in Medicine. 
CHARLES SHEARD, Instructor in Medicine. 
EDWARD M. SHEPARD, Instructor in Medicine. 
AARON D. SPIELMAN, Instructor in Medicine. 
WILLIAM D. STUBENBORD, Instructor in Medicine. 
JAMES T. SUTTER, Instructor in Medicine. 
KATHARINE W. SWIFT, Instructor in Medicine. 
DOUGLAS P. TORRE, Instructor in Medicine. 



*On leave of absence. 



56 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

MAURICE TULIN, Instructor in Medicine. 

J. RUSSELL TWISS, Instructor in Medicine. 

MARIAN TYNDALL, Instructor in Medicine. 

FREDERICK E. G. VALERGAKIS, Instructor in Medicine. 

FREDERICK C. WEBER, Jr., Instructor in Medicine. 

CHARLES A. WERNER, Instructor in Medicine. 

ERWIN A. WERNER, Instructor in Medicine. 

HAROLD N. WILLARD, Instructor in Medicine. 

FELIX WROBLEWSKI, Instructor in Medicine. 

SEYMOUR ZUCKER, Instructor in Medicine. 

JORGE ARAUJO, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

CARL A. BERNTSEN, Jr., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

KENNETH C. BOYCE, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

DONALD G. W. BROOKING, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

DOUGLAS J. BUCHAN, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

PHILIPPE V. CARDON, Jr., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

RONALD K. DOIG, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

DuMONT F. ELMENDORF, Jr., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

HELEN GOODELL, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

JOEL GRIBETZ, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

OTTO HERRMANN, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

BASIL S. HETZEL, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

HOWARD H. HIATT, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

MARY E. HOPPER, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

EDWARD G. KIDD, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

FREDERIC THEODORE KIRKHAM, Jr., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

ROBERT M. McCUNE, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

LOUISE H. ORMOND, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

PETER ROGATZ, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

WILLIAM W. SCHOTTSTAEDT, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

SELMA M. SHULTZ, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

EUGENE P. SIMON, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

HARRY A. SINCLAIRE, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

MARVIN H. SLEISENGER, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

A. HARELL STEINBERG, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

HERMAN STEINBERG, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

CARL R. STEVENSON, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

HERTHA H. TAUSSKY, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

ALEXANDER TAYLOR, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

VINCENT A. TOSCANI, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

JOHN A. TULLOCH, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

MARK ZBOROWSKI, Research Fellow of Anthropology in Medicine. 

JEAN H. ABEL, Assistant in Medicine. 

SEYMOUR ADVOCATE, Assistant in Medicine. 

FRANK N. BILISOLY, III, Assistant in Medicine. 

WARREN S. BRAVEMAN, Assistant in Medicine. 

THOMAS E. BRITTINGHAM, Assistant in Medicine. 

CAROLYN H. DIEHL, Assistant in Medicine. 

PIERRE M. DREYFUS, Assistant in Medicine. 

MARK EISENBUD, Assistant in Medicine. 

ESTHER M. FINCHER, Assistant in Medicine. 

PAUL J. FURLONG, Assistant in Medicine. 

FRANCIS J. GILROY, Assistant in Medicine. 

EDWARD I. HONIG, Assistant in Medicine. 



MEDICINE 57 

WILLIAM H. JEFFREYS, Assistant in Medicine. 
ERNEST T. LIVINGSTONE, Assistant in Medicine. 
ELLEN McDEVITT, Assistant in Medicine. 
DAVID W. MOLANDER, Assistant in Medicine. 
PATRICK J. MULROW, Assistant in Medicine. 
CARL K. NEEDY, Assistant in Medicine. 
DEWEY A. NELSON, Assistant in Medicine. 
THOMAS G. PENNINGTON, Assistant in Medicine. 
FRANCIS S. PERRONE, Assistant in Medicine. 
DAVID M. ROSEMAN, Assistant in Medicine. 
BERTON P. SMITH, Assistant in Medicine. 
LAWRENCE S. SONKIN, Assistant in Medicine. 
SUCCJO SUH, Assistant in Medicine. 
LAWRENCE SWEENEY, Assistant in Medicine. 
HARTWELL G. THOMPSON, Jr., Assistant in Medicine. 
PAUL R. voM EIGEN, Assistant in Medicine. 
LILA A. WALLIS, Assistant in Medicine. 
CARL WIERUM, Assistant in Medicine. 
MARY M. WILBER, Assistant in Medicine. 
EUGENE I. ZINS, Assistant in Medicine. 

WILLIAM G. C. MUNROE, Lecturer in Medicine (Tuberculosis). 
IGNAZ W. OLJENICK, Lecturer in Medicine (Neurology). 
ROBERT L. YE ACER, Lecturer in Medicine (Tuberculosis). 

Students begin their course in medicine in the second term of the 
second year with physical diagnosis under Dr. Stewart. They are intro- 
duced to this subject in the second term (two afternoons a week) by 
means of lectures, demonstrations, and practical work on normal sub- 
jects and patients. In the third term they spend two mornings a week 
with the patients either in the pavilions of New York Hospital or on the 
wards of Bellevue, Memorial Hospital, or Lincoln Hospital. 

An introductory course in neurologic diagnostic methods is given under 
the direction of Dr. Wolff in the third term of the second year. The 
work consists of demonstrations and intensive training in the discipline 
of neurological examination. The students in groups of three are assigned 
to an instructor on the neurology service at Bellevue Hospital. This 
work coincides in time with the other training in physical diagnosis. 

An introductory required course in clinical pathology is given in the 
third term of the second year, under the direction of Dr. Kellner. It 
consists of lectures and laboratory work. Among the topics discussed 
are the theory, practice, and application of methods for the examination 
of urine, blood, sputum, exudates, transudates, spinal fluid, gastric con- 
tents, and feces. The methods studied include chemical, morphological, 
serological, and animal inoculation methods which are of value as diag- 
nostic procedures. Discussion of the clinical signification of findings is 
included. In addition, certain allergic phenomena are presented in lec- 
ture and demonstration and their clinical relationship is discussed. 

In each of the terms of the third year, one third of the class act as 
clinical clerks in medicine in the pavilions of the New York Hospital. 



58 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

The medical wards of the New York Hospital under the supervision of 
Dr. Barr comprise five public pavilions totaling 126 beds. The service 
includes patients with diseases of the nervous system and of the skin. 
These are under the care of subdepartments which are organized for 
teaching and clinical research as well as the management of patients. 
They are, therefore, analogous to independent departments of derma- 
tology and neurology as seen in other hospitals. An active pulmonary 
service is functioning in close cooperation with the surgical service and 
pediatric service. Beds on the fourth floor are used for the study and 
treatment of infectious diseases, including tuberculosis, the exanthemata, 
and syphilis. The syphilis service (Medicine L) is organized for the study 
of all phases of the disease as well as for its epidemiological control. There 
is close cooperation with the department of psychiatry in the study of the 
neuroses and early manifestations of psychoses found in the wards and 
dispensary. 

The third year clinical clerkship at the New York Hospital is under 
the direction of Drs. Barr, Wolff, and Grace. The backbone of the 
student's training as a clinical clerk is believed to be his own experience 
with patients as amplified by reading and by contact with members of 
the hospital and teaching staff. He is given as much responsibility as 
is practical, namely, the recording, in the hospital records, of his own 
histories and laboratory examinations. These, together with his physical 
examinations, are supervised by tutors, each of whom has responsibility 
for the supervision of a small group of students. Additional teaching 
consists of rounds with the visiting and house staff and more formal 
conferences once a week in which the clerks present cases for criticism 
and discussion. In these it is attempted to cover the more important 
fields of internal medicine. The work of the clerkships is supplemented 
by frequent clinical conferences which are held throughout the academic 
year. During the clinical clerkship the students receive further training 
in the evaluation of signs and symptoms of disease of the nervous system. 
Twice a week the clinical clerks discuss the personality and psychiatric 
problems of their patients with a member of the department of psychi- 
atry. Two teaching visits a week at the New York Hospital are dedicated 
to neurological problems. This work supplements that of the second year 
by placing special emphasis upon etiology and therapeusis in diseases of 
the nervous system. 

The instruction of senior students is conducted in the outpatient de- 
partment with the intent of offering experience in general medicine, 
neurology, dermatology, and other medical specialties. Other departments 
of the clinic such as physiotherapy and dietotherapy provide demonstra- 
tions. Practical work with patients is supplemented by seminars, demon- 
strations, and conferences and by presentation of subjects by the students. 

This course for seniors has been fused with the Medical Comprehensive 



MEDICINE 59 

Care and Teaching Program, description of which will be found on page 
61. 

Clinical-pathological conferences organized by the department of 
pathology in conjunction with the clinical departments occur weekly 
throughout the year. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

CLINICAL CLERKSHIP AT BELLEVUE HOSPITAL .. .Br. E. 
Hugh Luckey and staff. For periods of one month. Maximum registra- 
tion, eight students. Work will include case assignments, ward rounds, 
frequent conferences with Dr. Luckey and members of his staflf. 

ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM .. .Br. Ephraim Shorr 
and staff. For periods of two months. Maximum registration, two stu- 
dents. The work will consist of assignments to diabetic clinic, endocrine 
clinic, metabolism ward, and participation in applicable laboratory 
methods. 

INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND CHEMOTHERAPY .. .Dr. Walsh 
McDermott and Dr. Ralph Tompsett. For periods of one or two months. 
Maximum registration, two students. Work will include assignments to 
infectious disease ward for the study of tuberculosis, participation in 
clinical and research projects under way in this subdepartment. 

NEUROLOGY ... Dr. Harold G. Wolff and staff. For periods of one 
month or two months. Maximum registration, three students. For the 
shorter period, the work will include participation in clinical activities, 
on the neurological outpatient department and ward. For the longer 
period, it will include also participation in investigative problems. 

CARDIOLOGY ... Dr. Harold J. Stewart and staff. For period of two 
months. Maximum registration, one student. The work will consist of 
participation in the cardiac clinic and wards, and the reading of electro- 
cardiograms, and assignments to research problems. 

HEMATOLOGY ... Dr. Paul Reznikoff and staff. For periods of one 
month or two months. Maximum registration, two students. The work 
will include participation in clinical activities in the outpatient depart- 
ment, ward, and hematology laboratory, together with possible assign- 
ment to investigate problems. 

NEUROANATOMY . . . This course, given by Dr. Louis Hausman, 
will cover the development and anatomy of the nervous system and 
laboratory work on the reconstruction of the nervous system. Each stu- 



60 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

dent makes his own model. The anatomical background of the diseases 
of the nervous system is considered. Hours to be arranged with the 
instructor. 

FORENSIC MEDICINE . . . 

(a) A series of 30 lectures given by Dr. Milton Helpern. The subject 
matter is illustrated with material derived from cases investigated by 
the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the Borough of Manhattan. 

This course covers the following topics: the obligations and rights of 
physicians; relations of the physician to government agencies; functions 
of the office of medical examiner and of coroner; investigation and de- 
termination of the cause of sudden, suspicious, and violent deaths; the 
medicolegal necropsy; identification, signs of death, changes in the body 
after death; sudden natural death; relationship of disease and trauma; 
suicidal, accidental, and homicidal violent deaths; blunt force injuries, 
stab and bullet wounds, traumatic asphyxia, rape, abortion, infanticide; 
toxicology, especially the indications of poisoning and the selection of 
organs for chemical analysis; examination of blood stains, seminal stains, 
and hair, forensic application of blood grouping; occupational injuries 
and diseases. 

Monday afternoon, 5-6 p.m. 
(b) Practical course. An opportunity will be afforded to learn the 
circumstances surrounding and to observe at first hand the autopsy find- 
ings in numerous and varied cases of sudden, unexpected, suspicious, 
and violent deaths which are continuously being brought to the attention 
of the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the Borough of Man- 
hattan for investigation. 

Course to be given at the City Mortuary, 400 East 29th Street. 

Applicants should arrange their time with Dr. Helpern. 

OTHER ELECTIVES . . . 

Other special electives may be arranged through conference with the 
head of the department. 



MEDICAL COMPREHENSIVE CARE AND TEACHING 

PROGRAM 

The course in comprehensive medicine occupies the major attention of 
half of the senior class during each of the two semesters. It is designed 
as a synthesis of the many disciplines to which the medical student has 
been exposed and as such may be considered a laboratory course in 
patient management. 

This represents a new departure from the previous fourth year cur- 
riculum only in that reorganization of fourth year courses in medicine, 
pediatrics, preventive medicine, and psychiatry into a continuum of 



I 



MEDICINE 61 

22!/2 weeks' duration permits a longer and more adequate study of 
problems in ambulatory medicine. 

Both the Medical and Pediatric Clinics have been designated as Com- 
prehensive Care Clinics in which, through the use of consultants, the 
diagnosis and treatment of patients will be attempted with minimal 
referral to other clinics. In this exercise senior students will play an im- 
portant role. In addition, each student will serve as a family physician 
to a selected family and will see adult members of the family in the 
General Medical Clinic and children in the General Pediatric Clinic by 
appointment. Under appropriate circumstances the student may make 
supervised house calls on members of his Comprehensive Care family to 
diagnose and treat illness. 

Teaching of preventive medicine will be emphasized through Dr. Har- 
old N. Willard, who will represent the department of public health and 
preventive medicine in the program. 

Emotional aspects of disease will be stressed through the participation 
of Dr. Francis Kane of the Department of Psychiatry in the care of 
Comprehensive Care patients. In addition, the student will carry out the 
treatment of individual psychiatric patients in the Payne Whitney Psychi- 
atric Clinic under the direction of Dr. Francis Hamilton. 

Dr. George Holswade of the department of surgery and Dr. Myron 
Buckman of the department of obstetrics and gynecology will provide 
appropriate consultation services in their specialties to the Comprehensive 
Care Clinics. 

Part-time electives in medical and pediatric subspecialties, psychiatry, 
and preventive medicine will be offered each student under the program 
in addition to the regular clinic work. 

Dr. George G. Reader will supervise the program and will be assisted 
by Dr. Richardson K. Noback of the department of medicine and the 
staff of the medical outpatient department and by Dr. Florence Marshall 
of the department of pediatrics and the staff of the pediatric outpatient 
department. 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 

R. GORDON DOUGLAS, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

BYRON H. GOFF, Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

ROY W. BONSNES, Associate Professor of Biochemistry in Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

EDWARD H. DENNEN, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

CARL T. JAVERT, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

HOWARD S. McCANDLISH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

CHARLES M. McLANE, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

JOSEPH N. NATHANSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

FRANK R. SMITH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WILLIAM H. CARY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

JOHN T. COLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

ROBERT L. CRAIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WILLIAM F. FINN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

RALPH W. CAUSE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

RANDOLPH GEPFERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

WILLIAM P. GIVEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

OSCAR CLASSMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

ARTHUR V. GREELEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

W. HALL HAWKINS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

DONALD G. JOHNSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

ELMER E. KRAMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

CURTIS L. MENDELSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

MEYER ROSENSOHN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

NELSON B. SACKETT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. 

THOMAS L. BALL, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

PERRY S. BOYNTON, Jr., Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

MYRON I. BUCHMAN, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

CHRISTIAN DeWINTER, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

HUGH HALSEY, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

ANN P. KENT, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

ROBERT LANDESMAN, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

VIRGINIA K. PIERCE, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

GEORGE SCHAEFER, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

CHARLES T. SNYDER, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

EDWARD F. STANTON, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

STANLEY J. BIRNBAUM, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WILLIAM H. BURKE, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WILLIAM DAVIS, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

THOMAS F. DILLON, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

62 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 63 

IRVING H. DREISHPOON, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
SAMUEL I. ETZ, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
WILLIAM D. McLARN, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
FRANCIS X. MOFFITT, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
KENNETH G. NICKERSON, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
ERWIN FLETCHER SMITH, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
WILLIAM J. SWEENEY, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
E. HENRY VALENTINE, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
JEROME A. WEINBAUM, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

The Lying-In Hospital, a division of the New York Hospital, provides 
116 paviHon beds for teaching purposes in obstetrics and gynecology. In 
addition, the private service consists of a total of 91 beds. Students are 
given practical instruction in the outpatient department clinics of both 
obstetrics and gynecology and in the various special clinics operated for 
the more intensive study and care of patients w^ith unusual problems. 
The students are given every opportunity to benefit from the clinical 
work as carried on and demonstrated on the wards and in the operating 
and delivery rooms. 

There are approximately 5,000 admissions to the obstetrical service 
and about 2,000 to the gynecological service each year. 

THIRD YEAR 

COURSE I. THE THEORY AND PRINCIPLES OF OBSTETRICS 
AND GYNECOLOGY . . . The content of this course consists of lectures 
and demonstrations covering the anatomy and physiology of the female 
reproductive system; the physiology and pathology of pregnancy, labor, 
and puerperium; and the etiology, pathology, and diagnosis of the dis- 
eases of the pelvic structures. 

The entire class meets for these sessions on Tuesdays and Saturdays 
12-1 p.m. throughout the year. Professors Douglas, Javert, Finn, John- 
son, McLane, and staff. Total hours, 66. 

COURSE II. PRACTICAL INSTRUCTION . . . This work is given 
to one-sixth of the class for periods of one-half of a trimester (5V2 weeks) 
on Tuesdays and Thursdays 9-11 a.m. The course deals especially 
with abdominal palpation, pelvic examination, and manikin exercises. 
Professors Douglas, Dennen, Kramer, and staff. 

COURSE III. SEMINAR... Tuesdsiys and Thursdays 11-12 a.m. 
Professors Douglas, Given, Johnson, Kramer, and staff. 

COURSE IV. PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATION . . . This course com- 
prises instruction in obstetrical and gynecological bacteriology and path- 
ology. A considerable amount of this time is used in the study of pelvic 
neoplasms. Mondays 9-12 a.m. for one trimester. Professors Douglas, 
Javert, Finn, Ball, and staff. Total hours, 66 for Courses II, HI, and IV. 



64 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 



FOURTH YEAR 



MAJOR PRACTICAL OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY . . . This 
course comprises practical work in obstetrics and gynecology and is the 
sequel to the theoretical instruction offered to the third year students. 
Each student will live in the Lying-in Hospital for a period of VA weeks 
during which time he will act as a clinical assistant to the obstetrical and 
gynecological departments, hospital wards, delivery and operating rooms, 
and clinics. He will be provided with sleeping accommodations but not 
with board. 

The practical work includes the prenatal care of many patients, at- 
tending them in labor and delivery as well as following them throughout 
the course of the puerperium. Facilities are also provided for the student 
to examine gynecological patients and to observe these patients through 
diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. 

Because of the nature of the service, night and week-end work is re- 
quired. Minimum hours allotted to the course, 264. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

PRACTICAL OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY ... A certain 
number of students will be accepted to serve as assistants in the clinic. 

Courses can be arranged in the chemical, bacteriological, and patho- 
logical laboratories for the study of specific research problems. The 
special clinics provide teaching facilities for clinical investigation in car- 
cinoma, endocrinology, heart disease. X-ray pelvimetry, infertility, and 
other allied sciences. The various rounds and staff conferences can be 
attended. 

Encouragement is given original work according to the departmental 
facilities and the student's capabilities and in general will be designed to 
meet the student's qualifications. 



PATHOLOGY 

JOHN G. KIDD, Professor of Pathology. 
JOHN M. PEARCE, Professor of Pathology. 
LEWIS D. STEVENSON, Associate Professor of Pathology. 
JOHN T. ELLIS, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
AARON KELLNER, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
CHARLES T. OLCOTT, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
F. STEPHEN VOGEL, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
GOETZ W. RICHTER, Research Associate in Pathology. 
CLAUDE IAN HOOD, Instructor in Pathology. 
MARTHA K. CAIRES, Assistant in Pathology. 
ARTHUR S. CARLSON, Assistant in Pathology. 
ROBERT HAUSMAN, Assistant in Pathology. 
CHIEN-YUAN KAO, Assistant in Pathology. 
CAREY STANTON, Assistant in Pathology. 
GORDON J. STOPPS, Assistant in Pathology. 
DAVID STUBINGTON, Assistant in Pathology. 

PAUL F. DE GARA, Lecturer in Pathology. 
JULES FREUND, Lecturer in Pathology. 
MILTON HELPERN, Lecturer in Pathology. 
THEODORE ROBERTSON, Lecturer in Pathology. 

GENERAL PATHOLOGY 

FACILITIES . . . The department of pathology occupies three floors 
of the central part of the College building, conveniently located above 
the library and in immediate contact with the Hospital, the autopsy 
room being in the connecting wing between College and Hospital. The 
teaching is largely concentrated on the third floor, where the autopsy 
room, demonstration room for pathological anatomy, anatomical mu- 
seum, and classrooms are found. The fourth and fifth floors are chiefly 
unit laboratories for staff members and graduate students and for tech- 
nical preparation. In addition, animal quarters and facilities for experi- 
mental work are on the fifth, sixth, and seventh floors. 

The museum contains a carefully selected collection of specimens, 
representing most of the common and many of the more unusual patho- 
logical lesions. It is especially rich in lesions of bones and in tumors. 
In addition to this mounted collection, there is available a very consider- 
able amount of constantly changing gross material for student study. 

The postmortem service of the New York Hospital affords abundant 
opportunity for study of pathological anatomy and its relation to clinical 
medicine. The systematic records of autopsies performed at the New 
York Hospital have been preserved since 1851, and in recent years pro- 
tocols and microscopic slides have been carefully indexed and filed. 

65 



66 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

INSTRUCTION . . . The course of instruction is given in the second 
and third terms of the second year. Gross and histological lesions are 
studied and their pathogenesis and correlation with disturbed function 
is considered. Lectures and classroom demonstrations are supplemented 
by studies at the autopsy table. The course begins with the degenera- 
tions, inflammation, and repair and proceeds with the various specific 
infections and tumors. The latter part of the course is devoted to special 
systematic pathology including an introduction to neuropathology. 

GENERAL AND SPECIAL PATHOLOGY . . . Required in the second 
and third terms of the second year. 

Professors Kidd, Pearce, Olcott, and staff. 275 hours. 

NEUROPATHOLOGY . . . The pathology of the nervous system is 
studied, and altered structure and function are correlated. Professor Stev- 
enson. 33 hours. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGICAL CONFERENCES . . . These confer- 
ences are held in cooperation with the staffs of the clinical departments 
of the Hospital and Medical College each week throughout the year. 
Observations concerning the clinical course and diagnosis of diseases are 
correlated with changes found at autopsy. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

A student may undertake the investigation of some problem in 
pathology or may pursue advanced courses in any of several fields to 
be determined by consultation with the head of the department. Research 
or elective courses will ordinarily require the entire time of the student 
for a period of one to three months, and may be continued into the 
summer. 



PEDIATRICS 

SAMUEL Z. LEVINE, Professor of Pediatrics. 

MAY G. WILSON, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

ARTHUR F. ANDERSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HENRY L. BARNETT, Associate Professor of Pediatrics. 

HAROLD W. K. DARGEON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, 

HENRY D. LAUSON, Associate Professor of Physiology in Pediatrics. 

CARL H. SMITH, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

PHILIP M. STIMSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HAROLD B. ADAMS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

LEONA BAUMGARTNER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

SAMUEL R. BERENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

CLEMENT B. P. COBB, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MARGARET DANN, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

PAUL F. DE GARA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics in Allergy. 

ROBERT O. Dubois, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HELENE ELIASBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

NATHAN EPSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

LEWIS M. FRAAD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

JOHN E. FRANKLIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MARTIN J. GLYNN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HENRY P. GOLDBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

JAMES Q. HARALAMBIE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HELEN HARRINGTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

FREDERICK C. HUNT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

EDMUND N. JOYNER, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HEDWIG KOENIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

BARBARA M. KORSCH, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

MILTON I. LEVINE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MARY E. MERCER, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in Psychiatry. 

CHARLES H. O'REGAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

LOUIS E. WEYMULLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MARJORIE A. WHEATLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

OTTO E. BILLO, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

WALTER T. CARPENTER, Jr., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MURRAY DAVIDSON, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MARY A. ENGLE, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MARVIN J. GERSH, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

HELEN N. HELPER, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

PHYLLIS H. KOTEEN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

FLORENCE N. MARSHALL, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MARION McILVEEN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

ROWLAND L. MINDLIN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

IRVING SCHULMAN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

BEATRICE S. SLATER, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

LOIS M. SMEDLEY, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MARTHA L. SMITH, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MAXWELL STILLERMAN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

DORIS S. WHITNEY, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

STANLEY S. ZIPSER, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

JEAN T. BEASLEY, Fellow in Pediatrics. 

HEINZ F. EICHENWALD, Assistant in Pediatrics. 

67 



68 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

MARION E. ERLANDSON, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
MARGARET M. KUGLER, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
HENRY H. PRIDE, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
LAWRENCE T. TAFT, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
JANE E. WELLEMEYER, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
HELEN McNAMARA, Research Assistant in Pediatrics. 
ELIZABETH V. NEW, Research Assistant in Pediatrics. 

THIRD YEAR ... A clinical lecture once a week throughout the entire 
school year presents the subjects of normal growth and development in 
infants and children, principles of nutrition with their application to 
infant feeding, and patients illustrating the peculiarities of disease in 
early life. Students serve as clinical clerks in pediatrics for a period of 
five and one-half weeks on the pavilions of the New York Hospital. They 
are assigned new cases in rotation and gain experience in the manage- 
ment of sick children requiring hospital residence. They are on duty in 
rotation at night and week ends. The work of the clinical clerkship in- 
cludes attendance at well-baby and prophylactic clinics, rounds, and 
seminars. Instruction in contagious diseases is given at the Willard 
Parker Hospital. Total hours, 165. 

FOURTH YEAR . . . The clinical lectures are continued through part 
of the fourth year. Students are assigned to the outpatient department 
in the mornings where they are given, under supervision, responsibility 
for the management of ambulatory pediatric patients. They take histo- 
ries, make physical examinations, and prescribe treatment. A daily 
therapeutic conference supplements the clinical work. A series of seminars 
for case presentation will be held under the supervision of senior staff 
members. An effort is made to bring back to the outpatient department 
certain patients seen by the students in their third year for follow-up 
during their fourth year term in pediatrics. Emphasis is placed on the 
handling of psychosomatic problems and on the measures which can be 
taken to promote proper growth and development. Students will be given 
the opportunity for longitudinal follow-up on individual patients so as to 
become familiar with normal growth and development of infants and 
children and the natural history of disease processes. Home visits and 
trips to inspect community resources will be planned in relation to patient 
referrals so as to furnish students with understanding of home and com- 
munity influences on the patient. Students will be assigned to the well- 
baby clinic. Cooperation with the Department of Obstetrics will make 
possible contacts with mothers during the ante partum and lying-in 
period. Total hours, 66. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Elective courses are open to fourth year students. These include the 
general pediatric clinic, emergency unit, some special pediatric clinics, 
afternoon seminars, nursery school experience, and research. Substitute 
internships are offered at times during the year. 



PHARMACOLOGY 

McKEEN CATTELL, Professor of Pharmacology. 

HARRY GOLD, Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. 

WALTER F. RIKER, Jr., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 

JANET TRAVELL, Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. 

THEODORE H. GREINER, Assistant Professor of CHnical Pharmacology. 

CHARLES J. KENSLER, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. 

WALTER MODELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. 

FRANK C. FERGUSON, Jr., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

SOLOMON GARB, Instructor in Pharmacology. 

NATHANIEL T. KWIT, Instructor in Pharmacology. 

GEORGE C. READER, Instructor in Pharmacology (Therapeutics). 

JOSEPH F. REILLY, Instructor in Pharmacology. 

SEYMOUR H. RINZLER, Instructor in Pharmacology. 

EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY . . . Laboratory work, demon- 
strations, conferences, and lectures given during the first term of the 
second year. The experiments are designed to illustrate a wide range 
of pharmacologic effects, the more important drugs being considered 
with reference to their action on different structures and their behavior 
in the organism. In conference, the laboratory data obtained by the 
class are assembled and discussed in relation to each other and to ex- 
periments reported in the literature. This course also includes elementary 
pharmacy and toxicology, with a consideration of crude drugs, practice 
in the making of pharmacopoeial preparations, and toxicological analysis. 
121 hours. 

APPLIED PHARMACOLOGY . . . This course is given during the 
third trimester of the second year and is a continuation of the course in 
experimental pharmacology. It is intended to fill a gap between experi- 
mental pharmacology and the clinical use of drugs, and it deals with 
substances the pharmacological action of which can best be demon- 
strated on clinical material. This course includes practice in prescription 
writing. Emphasis is placed on evidence bearing directly on the human 
subject in health and diseases. 22 hours. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

CONFERENCES ON THERAPY . . . Weekly informal conferences on 
treatment arranged by the departments of pharmacology and medicine 
in collaboration with other departments. These serve as a forum for 
the exchange of views and evaluation of evidence concerning drugs and 
other measures used in the treatment of disease, with open discussion 
by students, members of the College and Hospital staff, and visitors. 

69 



70 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

RESEARCH . . . Arrangements are made for individuals or groups to 
participate in original investigations with a view to learning the methods 
of pharmacological research. Special opportunities are afforded for work 
on enzyme systems, muscle-nerve, autonomic nervous system, and the 
cardiovascular system. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOPHYSICS 

ROBERT F. PITTS, Professor of Physiology. 

JAMES D. HARDY, Associate Professor of Physiology. 

HENRY D. LAUSON, Associate Professor of Physiology. 

RICHARD W. LAWTON, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

JOHN MacLeod, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

ROY C. SWAN, Instructor in Physiology. 

DAVID D. THOMPSON, Instructor in Physiology. 

PHILIP J. DORMAN, Fellow in Physiology. 

MARTIN LIPKIN, Fellow in Physiology. 

MELVILLE G. MAGIDA, Fellow in Physiology. 

W. JAMES SULLIVAN, Fellow in Physiology. 

MARTHA J. BARRETT, Assistant in Physiology. 

ALICE M. STOLL, Assistant in Physiology. 

ROBERT A. WOLBACH, Assistant in Physiology. 

FIRST YEAR . . . Lectures, conferences, laboratory experiments, and 
demonstrations. Physiology of muscle and nerve, gland secretion, diges- 
tion, the central nervous system, special senses, and endocrine organs. 
The laboratory work one full day a week includes experiments on these 
subjects. 110 hours. 

SECOND YEAR . . . Lectures, conferences, laboratory experiments, and 
demonstrations. Physiology of respiration, blood, heart, circulation, 
kidney, and metabolism. Laboratory exercises one full day a week. 121 
hours. 

The course of instruction in physiology is directed toward an under- 
standing of the principles involved in the functioning of the human 
body and the integration of its various systems. The lectures are sup- 
plemented by references to the current literature. The department is 
fortunate in having housed on the fourth floor of its building the Graham 
Lusk Library of Physiology, a gift to the department from its late Pro- 
fessor Graham Lusk. This includes bound volumes of complete sets of 
the important physiological and biochemical literature, monographs, 
handbooks, and textbooks, and is being supplemented by some of the 
current journals and monographs. In addition to the College library, 
the facilities of this library are at the disposal of the students of medicine. 

The laboratory work includes a number of human experiments, 
emphasizes mammalian physiology, and is directed toward quantitative 
determinations. The laboratory experiments are chosen to illustrate 
fundamental principles in the respective fields of physiology and are 
correlated with lectures by means of conferences. The demonstrations 
include instruction in specialized techniques, experimental preparations, 
and presentation of clinical cases. These are facilitated by the participa- 

71 



72 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

tion and cooperation of staff members of various departments in the 
Medical College and the New York Hospital. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

The department will arrange a schedule of work for fourth year 
students who wish to devote their elective time to physiology. 

COURSES OPEN TO SPECIAL STUDENTS 

L PHYSIOLOGY. Fee, $100 for each term. 

2. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESEARCH. Subject to special arrangement 
with head of the department. 



PSYCHIATRY 

OSKAR DIETHELM, Professor of Psychiatry. 

PHYLLIS GREENACRE, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

THOMAS A. C. RENNIE, Professor of Psychiatry (Social Psychiatry). 

CARL A. BINGER, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

J. LOUISE DESPERT, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

WILLIAM H. DUNN, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

GEORGE W. HENRY, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

ADE T, MILHORAT, Associate Professor of Medicine in Psychiatry. 

JAMES H. WALL, Associate Professor of Chnical Psychiatry. 

LIVINGSTON WELCH, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

HAROLD G.. WOLFF, Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

ALAN W. FRASER, Assistant Professor of Chnical Psychiatry. 

FRANCIS J. HAMILTON, Assistant Professor of Chnical Psychiatry. 

RICHARD L. HARRIS, Assistant Professor of Chnical Psychiatry. 

GERALD R. JAMEISON, Assistant Professor of Chnical Psychiatry. 

SEYMOUR G. KLEBANOFF, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

RICHARD N. KOHL, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

NORVELLE C. LaMAR, Assistant Professor of Chnical Psychiatry. 

ALEXANDER H. LEIGHTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

MARY E. MERCER, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in Psychiatry. 

CURTIS T. PROUT, Assistant Professor of Chnical Psychiatry. 

FRED V. ROCKWELL, Assistant Professor of Chnical Psychiatry. 

JOHN H. TRAVIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

JAMES S. TYHURST, Assistant Professor of Chnical Psychiatry. 

EXIE E. WELSCH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

HARRY ALPERT, Research Associate in Psychiatry. 

MILTON FARBER, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

ANNE MILMAN, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

EMIL OBERHOLZER, Research Associate in Psychiatry. 

EDWARD B. ALLEN, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

VALER BARBU, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

JULIAN I. BARISH, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

SARA A. BONNETT, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

ALBERT N. BROWNE-MAYERS, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

A. LOUISE BRUSH, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

HOWARD N. COOPER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

JOHN M. COTTON, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

ELEANOR CRISSEY, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

HELEN DANIELLS, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

M. FREILE FLEETWOOD, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

MARTIN J. GERSON, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

STEPHEN GOODYEAR, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

DONALD C. GREAVES, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

THOMAS F. HENLEY, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

FRANCIS D. KANE, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

PRICE A. KIRKPATRICK, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

CHARLES A. KNEHR, Instructor in Psychology. 

HELEN P. LANGNER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

LEON L. RACKOW, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

73 



74 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

ARNOLD A. SCHILLINGER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

MARY J. SHERFEY, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

ALBERT C. SHERWIN, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

DONALD J. SIMONS, Instructor in Psychiatr>\ 

LEONARD R. STRAUB, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

JOSEPH D. SULLIVAN, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

HANS SYZ, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

WILLIAM D. VOORHEES, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

MORTON WADSWORTH, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

NATHANIEL WARNER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

FREDERICK J. WERTZ, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

WALTER D. WOODWARD, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

HAROLD S. WRIGHT, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

IRWIN M. WEINSTOCK, Research Fellow in Biochemistry. 

I. WILLIAM BRILL, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

ALEXANDER CARLEN, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

ERIC T. CARLSON, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

EDWARD V. EVARTS, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

JOHN GUSSEN, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

LAWRENCE J. HATTERER, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

WALTER W. KEMP, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

GUY Y. LaROCHELLE, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

JOHN F. McGRATH, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

PETER F. OSTWALD, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

ROBERT E. PECK, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

SHIRLEY SCHAFFER, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

JOSEPH S. WIELAWSKI, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

The department of psychiatry offers instruction during each of the 
four years. The understanding of development of the normal personality 
forms a necessary basis for future clinical training. A course in psycho- 
pathology in the second year orients the student in personality disorders 
and in the methods of their examination and study. In the third year, 
this preliminary training is utilized in the study of patients at the Payne 
Whitney Psychiatric Clinic and on the pavilions of the New York 
Hospital. In the psychiatric outpatient department, during the fourth 
year, the student participates in the study and treatment of the diverse 
problems presenting themselves in general psychiatric practice. The im- 
portance of personality problems in general medicine is taught in the 
pavilions of the New York Hospital and in the outpatient service of the 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic. Clinics are planned to unify these 
many activities and to offer in addition a broad understanding of treat- 
ment and investigation. 

FIRST YEAR: PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT . . . This course 
acquaints the student with the development and methods of study of the 
normal personality. Lectures, seminars, and selected films are utilized in 
presenting a dynamic orientation to the formation of personality from 
infancy through senescence. The significance of interpersonal relations is 
stressed, with particular emphasis on the patient-physician relationship. 



PSYCHIATRY 75 

Psychological, physiological, and sociological factors are considered. 
Total hours, 22. 

SECOND YEAR: PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND METHODS OF 
EXAMINATION . . . The outstanding psychopathological phenomena 
are demonstrated and their psychodynamics studied by the students on 
patients in the outpatient department of the Payne Whitney Psychiatric 
Clinic and at the Manhattan State Hospital. This course offers practical 
experience in interviewing and history taking and in the methods of 
psychiatric examination. Total hours, 33. 

THIRD YEAR: CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY ... In the inpatient de- 
partment of the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic various psychiatric 
illnesses are presented; in the medical and surgical pavilions of the New 
York Hospital, patients are studied in whom psychological and psycho- 
pathological factors are important. Total hours, 33. 

FOURTH YEAR: CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY ... In this course in the 
outpatient department of the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, the 
student carries out the treatment of individual patients. This course of- 
fers an opportunity to learn psychotherapy under close supervision and 
to understand the role of psychiatric social service and of psychological 
studies in the adjustment of these patients. Clinics with case presenta- 
tion, with emphasis on psychiatric treatment and review of literature, 
are given on Wednesday from 2 to 3 o'clock. Seminars deal with the 
psychopathology of childhood and the management of related difficulties. 
Total hours, 99. 

ELECTIVE WORK 

Opportunities for elective work are provided in the outpatient depart- 
ment and in the laboratories of the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 
and at the Westchester Division of the New York Hospital, White Plains, 

N.Y. 



PUBLIC HEALTH AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

WILSON G. SMILLIE, Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

EMERSON DAY, Associate Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

MORTON C. KAHN, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Med- 
icine. 

LEONA BAUMGARTNER, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

SAMUEL R. BERENBERG, Assistant Professor of CHnical PubHc Health and 
Preventive Medicine. 

BEATRICE B. BERLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Pre- 
ventive Medicine. 

IRWIN D. J. BROSS, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Med- 
icine (Vital Statistics). 

AARON D. CHAVES, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Pre- 
ventive Medicine. 

HERBERT R. EDWARDS, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

FRANKLIN M. FOOTE, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

ANN P. KENT, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

PHILIP OLLSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

WILLIS M. WEEDEN, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Med- 
icine. 

HAROLD N. WILLARD, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

NINE CHOUCROUN, Research Associate in Public Health and Preventive Med- 
icine. 

BERNARD D. DAVIS, Research Associate in Public Health and Preventive Med- 
icine. 

HUGH R. DeHAVEN, Research Associate in Public Health and Preventive Med- 
icine. 

DANIEL A. ALVAREZ, Instructor in Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

FRANCES H. BOGATKO, Instructor in Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

JAMES H. EWING, Instructor in Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

THOMAS G. RIGNEY, Instructor in Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

WALTER D. WOODWARD, Instructor in Public Health and Preventive Med- 
icine. 

SECOND YEAR: PARASITOLOGY . . . This course is assigned to the 
department of pubHc health and preventive medicine because the major 
interests of several members of the stafT He in the field of tropical medi- 
cine. Furthermore, the preventive aspects of diseases that are produced 
by parasites are of paramount importance in the control of these infec- 
tions. 

The course is given each Thursday afternoon during the first trimester 

76 



PUBLIC HEALTH & PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 77 

of the second year. The lectures are given from 2 to 3 and the laboratory 
work from 3 to 5 p.m. 

The important parasites of man are considered: the mode of trans- 
mission of each parasite is studied, as well as the life cycle and inter- 
mediate hosts. Particular emphasis is placed on the clinical aspects of 
the various diseases that may be produced by the parasites. Prevention 
and control of human parasitic diseases are given proper consideration, 
and the therapy of these conditions is discussed carefully. 

An abundance of material is used for demonstration purposes. Many 
of the parasites are studied in living stages. Clinical cases of the various 
diseases under study are presented from the hospital wards, outpatient 
clinics, and elsewhere, whenever suitable material is available. Total 
hours, 33. 

SECOND YEAR: PUBLIC HEALTH ... The course in public health 
begins in the second term of the second year. It is an introductory course 
in environmental sanitation, industrial hygiene, vital statistics, and the 
principles of public health. The students are assigned to this work every 
Monday afternoon for approximately eleven exercises. Laboratory assign- 
ments and field exercises make up the major part of the work. The es- 
sential material covered in this term relates to community health pro- 
tection, including the control of water supplies, sewage disposal, and the 
sanitation of food. Housing is studied in relation to its various social and 
hygienic aspects, as well as air-borne infection and the problems of in- 
dustrial hygiene. Four afternoons are devoted to vital statistics, includ- 
ing a consideration of the methods of statistical analysis and interpreta- 
tion; three afternoons are devoted to health promotion of the industrial 
worker. Field visits are made, usually in small groups, to demonstrate 
industrial sanitation, housing, the New York City Health Department's 
diagnostic laboratory service, and other pertinent matters. Total hours, 
33. 

THIRD YEAR: PREVENTIVE MEDICINE . . . Students are divided 
into small groups of about twelve each. These students are assigned to the 
department of preventive medicine every Friday all day for a five to six 
week period. The sections are subdivided into groups of about four stu- 
dents. These groups are then assigned to section work in the various ac- 
tivities of the Kips Bay-Yorkville Health Center. In addition, the stu- 
dents are given a full day's session with the Department of Workmen's 
Compensation and one half-day session at the Strang Cancer Prevention 
Clinic at Memorial Hospital. Each Friday at noon throughout the year 
the whole class assembles for a lecture or discussion. The subject matter 
of these exercises has, for the most part, been prepared by and is pre- 
sented by the students themselves. Total lectures and discussions, 33 
hours; total section work, 33 hours. 



78 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

FAMILY HEALTH ADVISERS ... A student may elect to serve as a 
"Family Health Adviser." Each of these students is assigned a family 
from the clientele of the New York Hospital. Under careful guidance, 
over a period of two years, he becomes the confidential adviser to the 
family on health matters. He observes the economic and social status of 
the family, their housing and nutrition. As opportunity offers, he aids the 
family in the utilization of the community resources that may be avail- 
able to meet the family health needs. 

COMMUNITY STUDY ... If the student prefers, he may select a 
"Community Study" instead of an assignment as Family Health Adviser. 
This study consists of a report upon a community of his own choice, giv- 
ing in detail the facilities provided by the community for care of illness 
and protection of community health. This report includes not only the 
activities of the community health and welfare departments, but also 
the hospital facilities, medical, nursing, and dental personnel, and all 
other phases of community activities that aid in providing adequate 
medical care. 

FOURTH YEAR: The teaching of preventive medicine in the fourth 
year is incorporated in the new plan for instruction of students in Com- 
prehensive Medical Care. This program is under the leadership of the 
department of medicine. One member of the stafT of public health and 
preventive medicine is assigned to the project, and it will be his function 
to aid in instruction concerning the incorporation of preventive medicine 
in clinical practice. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE ... An elective course is offered to students 
in the fourth year. Not more than four students will be accepted for any 
one period. Students will be assigned to the Kips Bay-Yorkville District 
Health Center and will participate in the various clinical and research 
activities of the Center. 

MEDICAL PARASITOLOGY . . . This course is intended to supple- 
ment and extend the required work in this field. Diagnosis, life histories 
of parasites and their vectors, and control measures are considered with 
special reference to tropical medicine. 

The department has been the recipient of the Marcelle Fleischmann 
Memorial Fund for the study of immunologic and allergic phenomena in 
tropical diseases. Third or fourth year students may associate themselves 
with one of the several research projects being carried out under this 
grant. 



RADIOLOGY 

JOHN A. EVANS, Associate Professor of Radiology and Radiologist-in-Ghief. 

HAROLD L. TEMPLE, Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

SYDNEY WEINTRAUB, Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

RALPH F. PHILLIPS, Associate Professor of Radiology. 

ROBERT S. SHERMAN, Associate Professor of Radiology. 

HARRY W. BURNETT, Assistant Professor of Radiology. 

ELIZABETH F. FOCHT, Assistant Professor of Radiology (Physics). 

GEORGE JASPIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

T. ARTHUR PEARSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

ISRAEL STEINBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology (Medicine). 

STEPHEN WHITE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

EDUARDO CACERES, Instructor in Radiology. 

FLORENCE CHIEN-HWA CHU, Instructor in Radiology. 

ANDRE S. CAPIDAGLIS, Instructor in Radiology. 

HERBERT G. KANTOR, Instructor in Radiology. 

ALFRED W. KANY, Instructor in Radiology. 

JOHN L. McCLENAHAN, Instructor in Radiology. 

IRVING SCHWARTZ, Instructor in Radiology. 

HENRY M. SELBY, Instructor in Radiology. 

JOHN J. SNODGRASS, Instructor in Radiology. 

RUTH E. SNYDER, Instructor in Radiology. 

JAMES M. KEEGAN, Assistant in Radiology. 

MARTIN S. WETCHLER, Assistant in Radiology. 

KENT F. WESTLEY, Assistant in Radiology. 

The teaching of radiology is conducted by didactic lectures, by section 
work with smaller groups in connection with clinical clerkships, and by 
presentation of the X-ray aspects of various cases at the regular confer- 
ences of the clinical departments. Moreover, elective courses given in the 
fourth year play an important part in supplementing these methods. A 
large film and lantern slide museum of cases carefully selected for their 
teaching value has been prepared. This is constantly added to from the 
abundant material passing through the department. Three floors of the 
L Building are assigned to X-ray work. In addition, equipment for special 
examinations is located in the Woman's Clinic, Urology, Psychiatry, and 
elsewhere in the Medical College and Hospital. 

During the first year, in collaboration with the department of anatomy, 
anatomical structures are visualized by radiographic and rotentgen- 
oscopic methods. 

The didactic work consists of a series of eleven lectures to the entire 
second year class. These include the fundamental principles of radiation 
physics. X-ray diagnosis, and X-ray and radium therapy, with the aim 
of making the student aware at this stage of the various uses of X-rays. 
The indications and limitations are stressed. 

Section work is conducted in the third year, while the students are 

79 



80 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

serving as clinical clerks. The departments of medicine, pediatrics, and 
surgery assign each group receiving instruction from them to the de- 
partment of radiology for regularly scheduled informal sessions. Specifi- 
cally related X-ray material is presented and correlated with the clinical 
and laboratory findings. These sessions total approximately thirty hours. 
Twenty lectures on roentgendiagnosis and radiation therapy are given 
to the fourth year class. 

ELECTIVES 

FOURTH YEAR . . . 

(1) X-ray Clinical Clerkships. A limited number of students are ac- 
cepted to observe, and assist where possible, in the routine activities of 
the department. The routine includes film interpretations, fluoroscopy, 
therapeutic irradiation, and attendance at radiology conferences. Two 
conferences are held daily (L-611) at which time the more interesting 
diagnostic and therapeutic problems are discussed. One conference is held 
from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. The second session, from 1 p.m. to 2 
p.m., is limited to a review of the current examinations of the gastroin- 
testinal tract. 

(2) Technique of Fluoroscopy. Two hours. Limited to six students. 
Arrangements to be made through department head. 

(3) Gastrointestinal Fluoroscopy and Film Interpretation. One month. 
Limited to six students at any one time. During the period of the elective, 
the students will be permitted to perform fluoroscopic examinations under 
supervision. Arrangements to be made through department head. 

(4) Angiocardiography and Cardiac Catheterization. Individual in- 
struction available for interested students. 



SURGERY 

FRANK GLENN, Professor of Surgery. 

ALEXANDER BRUNSCHWIG, Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

GUILFORD S. DUDLEY, Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

WILLIAM MacFEE, Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN M. McLEAN, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 

ARTHUR PALMER, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology). 

JOHN M. PEARCE, Professor of Pathology in Surgery. 

BRONSON S. RAY, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). 

PHILIP D. WILSON, Professor of CHnical Surgery (Orthopedics). 

FRANK E. ADAIR, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

JOSEPH F. ARTUSIO, Jr.^, Associate Professor of Surgery (Anesthesiology). 

WILLIAM A. BARNES, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

GEORGE E. BINKLEY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

CHARLES G. CHILD, III, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

BRADLEY L. COLEY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

HERBERT CONWAY, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery (Plastic Surgery). 

WILLIAM A. COOPER, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery. 

NELSON W. CORNELL, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery. 

JOHN W. DRAPER, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery (Urology). 

JOHN H. ECKEL, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery.' 

KRISTIAN G. HANSSON, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery (Physical 
Medicine) . 

CRANSTON W. HOLMAN, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery. 
FREDERICK L. LIEBOLT, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery (Ortho- 
pedics). 
VICTOR F. MARSH.\LL, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery (Urology). 
HAYES E. MARTIN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
GERVAIS W. McAULIFFE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surger>' (Otolaryng- 
ology). 
ALLISTER M. McLELLAN, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery (Urology). 
JAMES A. MOORE, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery (Otolaryngology). 
SAMUEL W. MOORE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surger>'. 
WILLIAM F. NICKEL, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
GEORGE T. PACK, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
RUSSEL H. PATTERSON, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery. 
E. COOPER PERSON, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
RICHMOND STEPHENS, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery '(Orthopedics). 
T. CAMPBELL THOMPSON, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery (Ortho- 
pedics). 
PRESTON A. WADE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
LEWIS C. WAGNER, Associate Professor of CHnical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
IRVIN BALENSWEIG, Assistant Professor of CHnical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
JOHN R. COBB, Assistant Professor of CHnical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
ARTHUR D. CONSOLE, Assistant Professor of CHnical Surgery (Neurosurgery). 
WILLIAM COOPER, Assistant Professor of CHnical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
MICHAEL R. DEDDISH, Assistant Professor of CHnical Surgery. 
JAMES A. DINGWALL, III, Assistant Professor of CHnical Surgery. 
EDWARD A. DUNLAP, Assistant Professor of CHnical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 
GEORGE F. EGAN, Assistant Professor of CHnical Surgery (Dental Surgery). 

81 



82 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

JOHN T. ELLIS, Assistant Professor of Pathology in Surgery. 

JOSEPH H. FARROW, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

GEORGE A. FIEDLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 

EDGAR L. FRAZELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

HAROLD GENVERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN C. A. GERSTER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

DAN M. GORDON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 

NORMAN L. HIGINBOTHAM, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

GUSTAVUS A. HUMPHREYS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urol- 
ogy). 

D. REES JENSEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

SAMUEL F, KELLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology). 

ERNEST W. LAMPE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

FRANK J. McGOWAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

FREDERICK C. McLELLAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 

GORDON P. McNEER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

LAURENCE MISCALL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Bellevue). 

WARD D. O'SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

HERBERT PARSONS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). 

ROBERT L. PATTERSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ortho- 
pedics). 

JOHN L. POOL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

PETER C. RIZZO, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 

JOHN G. SCHMIDT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

STUART S. SNYDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 

RICHARD B. STARK, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Plastic Surgery). 

JOHN E. SUTTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

NORMAN E. TREVES, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

FRANCIS P. TWINEM, Assistant Professor of CHnical Surgery (Urology). 

F. STEPHEN VOGEL, Assistant Professor of Pathology in Surgery. 

WILLIAM L. WATSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN P. WEST, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

WILLET F. WHITMORE, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 

HELENA GILDER, Research Associate in Surgery (Biochemistry). 

DOYLE JOSLIN, Research Associate in Surgery (Plastic Surgery). 

JACOB APPLEBAUM, Instructor in Surgery. 

WILLIAM H. AYRES, Instructor in Surgery. 

GEORGE B. BANISTER, Instructor in Surgery. 

IRVING BARAS, Instructor in Surgery. 

STANLEY J. BEHRMAN, Instructor in Surgery. 

ANNE M. BELCHER, Instructor in Surgery. 

FRANCIS A. BENEVENTI, Instructor in Surgery. 

LEMUEL BOWDEN, Instructor in Surgery. 

JOHN J. BOWE, Instructor in Surgery. 

CHARLES N. BREED, Jr., Instructor in Surgery. 

MALCOLM W. BULMER, Instructor in Surgery.' 

WILLIAM G. CAHAN, Instructor in Surgery. 

THOMAS I. CAREY, Instructor in Surgery. 

DANIEL CATLIN, Instructor in Surgery. 

EDWARD C. COATS, Instructor in Surgery. 

ELIZABETH F. CONSTANTINE, Instructor in Surgery. 

ALEXANDER CONTE, Instructor in Surgery. 

CARLTON M. CORNELL, Instructor in Surgery. 

WILLIAM W. DANIEL, Instructor in Surgery. 

ROBERT D. DEANS, Instructor in Surgery. 



I 



SURGERY 83 



J. EDWIN DREW, Instructor in Surgery. 
WADE DULEY, Instructor in Surgery. 
HOWARD S. DUNBAR, Instructor in Surgery. 
ARMANDO M. ESPINOSA, Instructor in Surgery. 
HOLLON W. FARR, Instructor in Surgery. 
FRANK W. FARRELL, Instructor in Surgery. 
AUSTIN I. FINK, Instructor in Surgery. 
EDGAR P. FLEISCHMANN, Instructor in Surgery. 
MILTON GABEL, Instructor in Surgery. 
THOMAS J. GARRICK, Instructor in Surgery. 
JAMES L. GREEN, Instructor in Surgery. 
EUGENE J. GUENARD, Instructor in Surgery. 
JAMES S. HARRISON, Instructor in Surgery. 
CHARLES C. HARROLD, Jr., Instructor in Surgery. 
BRUCE R. HEINZEN, Instructor in Surgery. 
JAMES M. HOLMAN, Instructor in Surgery. 
GEORGE R. HOLSWADE, Instructor in Surgery. 
RUSSELL H. HOOKER, Instructor in Surgery. 
SUZANNE A. L. HOWE, Instructor in Surgery. 
FRANK J. HYNES, Instructor in Surgery. 
ROBERT A. JOHNSON, Instructor in Surgery. 
RICHARD C. KARL, Instructor in Surgery. 
JOSEPH T. KAUER, Instructor in Surgery. 
EDWARD B. C. KEEPER, Instructor in Surgery. 
JAMES T. KELLY, Instructor in Surgery. 
JOHN S. LEWIS, Instructor in Surgery. 
LUGILE LOSEKE, Instructor in Surgery. 
BERNARD MAISEL, Instructor in Surgery. 
BENJAMIN E. MARBURY, Instructor in Surgery. 
ROY D. McCLURE, Jr., Instructor in Surgery. 
CHARLES T. MEACHAM, Instructor in Surgery. 
LEOPOLD MEHLER, Instructor in Surgery. 
CHARLES J. MILLER, Instructor in Surgery. 
THEODORE R. MILLER, Instructor in Surgery. 
OLIVER S. MOORE, Instructor in Surgery. 
JUAN NEGRIN, Instructor in Surgery. 
JOHN B. OGILVIE, Instructor in Surgery. 
EARL A. O'NEILL, Instructor in Surgery. 
ALBERT J. PAQUIN, Instructor in Surgery. 
MICHAEL RAPAK, Instructor in Surgery. 
ERIC C. RICHARDSON, Instructor in Surgery. 
GUY F. ROBBINS, Instructor in Surgery. 
ISABEL M. SCHARNAGEL, Instructor in Surgery. 
CARL J. SCHMIDLAPP, III, Instructor in Surgery. 
DAVID S. SPEER, Instructor in Surgery. 
MAUS W. STEARNS, Jr., Instructor in Surgery. 
LEE R. STRAUB, Instructor in Surgery. 
JOHN F. STRUVE, Instructor in Surgery. 
H. RANDALL TOLLEFSEN, Instructor in Surgery. 
RICHARD C. TROUTMAN, Instructor in Surgery. 
GEORGE K. TWEDDEL, Instructor in Surgery. 
JEROME A. URBAN, Instructor in Surgery. 
FREDERICK VomSAAL, Instructor in Surgery. 
WILLIS M. WEEDEN, Instructor in Surgery. 
PAUL C. WETZIG, Instructor in Surgery. 



84 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

JOSEPH R. WILDER, Instructor in Surgery. 
WILFRED D. WIXGEBACH, Instructor in Surgery. 
WILLIAM I. WOLFF, Instructor in Surgery. 
ARMAND ARSENAULT, Assistant in Surgery. 
DAVID BARR, Assistant in Surgery. 
DAVID S. BREEN, Assistant in Surgery. 
McHENRY S. BREWER, Assistant in Surgery. 
MITCHELL BRICE, Assistant in Surgery. 
ROBERT J. BYERS, Assistant in Surgery. 
GEORGE N. CORNELL, Assistant in Surgery. 
DANIEL W. DAVIS, Assistant in Surgery. 
CHARLES F. DYER, Assistant in Surgery. 
THOMAS J. FERRARO, Assistant in Surgery. 
EDWARD A. FREE, Assistant in Surgery. 
JAMES G. GRAY, Assistant in Surgery. 
CHARLES S. HARRISON, Assistant in Surgery. 
DANIEL M. HAYS, Assistant in Surgery. 
ALEXANDER HERSH, Assistant in Surgery. 
JACK HOLDEN, Assistant in Surgery. 
HENRY L. HOOD, Assistant in Surgery. 
THOMAS C. KERNS, Jr., Assistant in Surgery. 
JOSEPH P. LABBE, Assistant in Surgery. 
ANTONIO F. LaSORTE, Assistant in Surgery. 
JEROME LAWRENCE, Assistant in Surgery. 
VALENTINO D. MAZZIA, Assistant in Surgery. 
ROBERT J. McKENNA, Assistant in Surgery. 
EDWARD W. D. NORTON, Assistant in Surgery. 
S. FRANK REDO, Assistant in Surgery. 
THOMAS D. REES, Assistant in Surgery. 
ROBERT M. SPELLMAN, Assistant in Surgery. 
I. ROBERT SPIER, Assistant in Surgery. 
BJORN THORBJARNARSON, Assistant in Surgery. 
MARJORIE J. TOPKINS, Assistant in Surgery. 
GEORGE E. WANTZ, Jr., Assistant in Surgery. 
HOWARD WAY, Assistant in Surgery. 
DONALD L. WEEKS, Assistant in Surgery. 
PHILIP D. WILSON, Jr., Assistant in Surgery. 



GENERAL SURGERY 

SECOND YEAR . . . During the third term of the second year, two 
hours a week will be devoted to history taking and examination of sur- 
gical patients. Total hours, 22. 

THIRD YEAR ... In the third year, students spend the entire time for 
one term in the outpatient department, both for general surgeiy and the 
surgical specialties. During this time they gain experience in history tak- 
ing, physical examination, diagnostic work-up, and care of outpatients. 
Here, the students come in contact with patients exhibiting a wide vari- 
ety of surgical conditions. 

During this term, for four mornings and four afternoon sessions in the 



I 



SURGERY 85 

diagnostic clinic of general surgery and also in the minor surgery clinic, 
students work on patients, make differential diagnoses, and formulate 
treatment in conference with a senior instructor. One lecture each week 
is devoted to fractures, and, in addition, each student spends one after- 
noon a week in the fracture clinic. During the week, three conferences 
with the entire group and a senior instructor are held, at which time se- 
lected topics are presented and discussed. A course in operative surgery 
on animals, designed to emphasize the fundamental principles of surgery, 
occupies one morning each week. 

A surgical clinic is held at the noon hour for students of the third 
year, throughout the year. A weekly clinic pathological conference is 
held, attended by both the third and fourth year students. Time, 330 
hours. 

FOURTH YEAR . . . During the time assigned to surgery in the fourth 
year, the students spend their entire time on the surgical pavilions as 
clinical clerks. This allows the opportunity of following each patient to 
the operating room and also of following specimens in surgical pathology. 
In conjunction with this, a surgical symposium is held each week, at 
which time recent advances in surgery are discussed. A conference in 
surgical pathology is given weekly, in order to correlate all findings in 
regard to individual patients. One hour each day is devoted to a confer- 
ence in general surgery or one of the specialties, including neurosurgery, 
chest surgery, and plastic surgery. Both the third and fourth year classes 
attend the surgical grand rounds each week. Time, 264 hours. 

OPHTHALMOLOGY . . . During the third term of the second year, 
the entire class receives instruction in microscopy of the eye including 
the pathology of such important diseases as uveitis, glaucoma, intraocular 
tumors, tuberculosis, injuries, and sympathetic ophthalmia. Introduction 
to special diagnosis, techniques, and particularly use of the opthalmo- 
scope, is given at this time. Total hours, 22. 

In the term of the third year assigned to surgery, a series of lectures 
and clinical demonstrations is held one afternoon a week in which the 
commoner eye conditions encountered in the outpatient department and 
on the wards are covered. At the same time each student spends a limited 
period of time in the Ophthalmological Clinic. 

In the term of the fourth year assigned to surgery, the students are ro- 
tated in small groups through the outpatient department for examination, 
diagnosis, and treatment of patients under supervision. This is supple- 
mented by conferences and ward rounds. 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY . . . During each trimester in surgery of the 
third year, there is one lecture a week in orthopedic surgery which serves 
as an introduction to the clinical work on the orthopedic pavilion. Stu- 



86 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

dents work in the orthopedic outpatient clinic during the entire period 
of 1 1 weeks. 

In the fourth year a Hmited number of students serve as clinical clerks 
on the orthopedic pavilion. 

OTOLARYNGOLOGY ... In the surgical term of the third year, 
formal clinical lectures are given. The anatomy of the head is reviewed, 
and instruction in the examination of the ear, nose, and throat is given. 
Bronchoscopy and rhinoplasty are discussed. Students spend one after- 
noon each week in the otolaryngological outpatient department and have 
the opportunity to study cases on the pavilions as well. During this per- 
iod, special topics are presented to the section by various members of the 
teaching staff. 

Opportunity is offered during the elective term of the fourth year to 
spend additional time on this subject. 

UROLOGY . . . The teaching of urology is carried out by means of lec- 
tures and clinics during the surgical term of the third year, at which 
time patients suffering from a wide variety of urological conditions are 
presented. The teaching is supplemented by experience in the urological 
wards and outpatient department. 



i 



MILITARY MEDICINE 

DONALD G. W. BROOKING, Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

This is an elective course currently ofTered in seventy-seven medical 
schools throughout the country under the joint auspices of the U.S. 
Army and the U.S. Air Force. It is a progressive course extending 
through the four years and consisting of a one hour period each week 
and, in addition, one six weeks' summer training camp. Upon graduation 
from medical college each student who completes the course in military 
medicine is commissioned a First Lieutenant in the Medical Corps of 
the U.S. Army Reserve or the U.S. Air Force Reserve. 

Any male citizen who meets the physical and other requirements for 
commission in the Officers' Reserve Corps is eligible for enrollment in 
the course, and all other medical students are welcome to sit in on classes. 
Those who have reserve commissions in the Navy, Marine Corps, or 
Coast Guard may not be enrolled in the Advanced Course, which begins 
in the junior year, without first resigning such commissions. 

There are no financial considerations involved in the Basic Course ex- 
tending through the freshman and sophomore years, but during the 
Advanced Course each student is paid a commutation of subsistence 
amounting to approximately $265 a year in addition to the pay he re- 
ceives while in attendance at the summer camp and travel allowances to 
camp and return. Uniforms are worn only during the period of the Med- 
ical ROTC camp. 

Military medicine is essentially preventive medicine, and the course is 
designed to supplement the regular medical curriculum by providing such 
training as would enable the young physician to take his place and func- 
tion efficiently in the armed forces without additional time-consuming 
preliminary training, or to assume a position of medical leadership in a 
civilian catastrophe situation and the planning and organization in antic- 
ipation thereof. During the Basic Course the organization of the Army 
and the Air Force and their medical services, and the tactical employ- 
ment of the components thereof are explained. The fundamentals of 
military law and administration are taught together with map reading, 
emergency care, and evacuation of the wounded. 

During the Advanced Course, while orthodox clinical medicine, sur- 
gery, and psychiatry are being learned in the regular curriculum, military 
medicine presents the modifications necessitated by the catastrophe situ- 
ation. Preventive medicine in its many practical military applications 
receives the greatest attention, while additional subjects include field 
medicine and surgery, military psychiatry, the medical aspect§ of atomic, 

87 



88 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

chemical, and biological warfare, and military medical research and de- 
velopments. 

The principles of military medicine are the same principles that govern 
the successful management of civilian catastrophe situations, so in this 
atomic era it is urged that all medical students avail themselves of the 
increased preparedness afTorded by the medical ROTG program. 



i 



special Students 



ALL STUDENTS not registered in Cornell University Graduate School 
and not registered for the M.D. degree are Special Students. These are 
Special Students in the true sense of the word and must be especially 
qualified in preparation, ability, and objective in order to receive any 
consideration. They may or may not be graduate students in the sense 
of having completed work for a collegiate degree. They are admitted 
only by the consent of the head of the department and must be registered 
in the Administration Office of the Medical College and must pay their 
fees at the Business Office before being admitted to lectures or laboratory 
periods. They are required to carry and show on demand of the author- 
ities a permit of attendance. 

FEES 

Matriculation Fee $ 1 

Administration Fee $ 5 

Tuition fees vary depending upon the type of work taken. 

A breakage fee may be required. 



89 



Table of Kequired Hours 

First Second Third Fourth 
ANATOMY: ^ear Year Year Year Total 

Gross Anat. of the Human Body 374 

Histology and Embryology 180 

Neuroanatomy 84 638 

BIOCHEMISTRY 220 220 

BACTERIOLOGY 55 88 143 

PHYSIOLOGY 110 121 231 

PATHOLOGY 308 308 

PHARMACOLOGY 143 143 

MEDICINE: 

Physical Diagnosis 121 

Clinical Pathology 77 

Neurology 33 

Specialties, Clerkship & OPD . . 297 264 

Lectures 22 33 847 

*Medical Comprehensive Care . . 310 

SURGERY: 

Ophthalmology 22 

Introductory Surgery 22 

Specialties, Clerkship & OPD . . 297 264 

Lectures 33 638 

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY: 

Practical Instruction 66 264 

Lectures 66 396 

PEDIATRICS: 

Practical Instruction 132 66 

Lectures 33 231 

PSYCHIATRY: 

psychobiology 22 

Psychiatry 33 33 66 

Lectures 33 187 

PUBLIC HEALTH: 

Parasitology 33 

Field and Section 22 33 

Lectures 11 33 132 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 18 18 

RADIOLOGY 11 20 31 

ELECTIVE HOURS (264) 

Totals To45 To67 To74 1287 4473 

* The Medical Comprehensive Care Program is a joint project of all clinical departments and the 
department of public health. In addition to the 310 hours not assigned to any one department, this 
program embraces the assigned fourth year curricular hours of medicine and pediatrics and part of those 
of psychiatry. 

( ) Elective time not included in totals. 

90 



REQUIRED HOURS 

FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE 
1952-1953 



91 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Histology 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


10-11 


11-12 


12-1 














1-2 


Biochemistry 


Histology 


Free 


Biochemistry 


Biochemistry 




2-3 


Anatomy 


Histology 


Histology 


3-4 


4-5 






Mil. Med. 













Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 
10-11 


Neuroan- 
atomy 


Histology 


Anatomy 


Neuroan- 
atomy 




Neuroan- 
atomyt 
Histology 


Library 
Lectures* 


11-12 


12-1 












1-2 


Biochemistry 


Anatomy 




Biochemistry 


Biochemistry 




2-3 


Anatomy 


Free 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


3-4 


4-5 






Mil. Med. 













Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Biochemistry 


Physiology 


Biochemistry 


Physiology 


Biochemistry 


Physiology 


10-11 


Bacteriology 


11-12 






12-1 


Psychobiol. 


Psychobiol. 


1-2 














2-3 


Bacteriology 


Physiology 


Free 


Bacteriology 


Biochemistry 




3-4 


4-5 


Mil. Med. 







* When scheduled. 

t Five sessions histology and 6 neuroanatomy. 



92 



CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE 

1952-1953 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Pharmacology 


Physiology 


Physiology 


Pharmacology 


Physiology 


Physiology 


10-11 


Bacteriology 


Pharmacology 


11-12 


Pharmacology 


12-1 






1-2 










Bacteriology 


2-3 


Bacteriology 


Physiology 


Free 


Parasitology 


Bacteriology 


3-4 


4-5 


Mil. Med. 





Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Pathology 


Pathology 


Pathology 


Pathology 


Pathology 


Pathology 


10-11 


11-12 


12-1 




Mil. Med. 


1-2 






Free 








2-3 


Public 
Health 


Physical 
Diagnosis 


Physical 
Diagnosis 


Psychiatry 


3-4 


4-5 





Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


If 




Pathology 


^5 




It 


3.2^ 




bi 

3-2S 

2° 


Pathology 


10-11 




11-12 


12-1 


Appl. Pharm. 


Appl. Pharm. 


Introductory 
Medicine 


Neurology 


Introductory 
Medicine 




1-2 














2-3 


Clinical 
Pathology 


Clinical 
Pathology 


Free 


Introductory 
Surgery 


Clinical 
Pathology 




3-4 


4-5 


Ophthalmol- 
ogy 


Radiology 


Ophthalmol- 
ogy 




Mil. Med. 



















REQUIRED HOURS 

THIRD YEAR SCHEDULE 

1952-1953 



93 



Hours 


Monday \ Tuesday 


Wednesday \ Thursday \ Friday \ Saturday 


9-10 


Group A: Medicine (1) ; Ob.-Gyn., Ped., Psych., Pb. HI. (2) ; Surgery (3). 
Group B: Surgery (1); Medicine (2); Ob.-Gyn., Ped., Psych., Pb. HI. (3). 
Group C: Ob.-Gyn., Ped., Psych., Pb. HI. (1); Surgery (2); Medicine (3). 


10-11 


11-12 


12-1 


Pediatrics 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Surgery 


Medicine 


Pb. HI. 


Ob.-Gyn. 


1-2 














2-3 






Free 




3-4 


4-5 


C.P.C. 







DETAILED SCHEDULE— HALF TERM [bVi WEEKS) 
PEDIATRICS 



Hours 


Mondav 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Pediatrics 


10-11 


11-12 


12-1 


Pediatrics 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Surgery 


Medicine 


Pb.-Hl. 


Ob.-Gyn. 


1-2 














2-3 


Pediatrics 


Pediatrics 


Free 


Pediatrics 


3-4 


4-5 


C.P.C. 







DETAILED SCHEDULE— HALF TERM (5^/2 WEEKS; 

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY, PSYCHIATRY, 

PUBLIC HEALTH, CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Contag. 
Diseases 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Pb. HI. 


Free 


10-11 


11-12 


12-1 


Pediatrics 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Surgery 


Medicine 


Pb. HI. 


Ob.-Gyn. 


1-2 














2-3 




Psychiatry 


Free 


Psychiatry 


Pb. HI. 


3^ 


4-5 


C.P.C. 



94 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

FOURTH YEAR SCHEDULE 

1952-1953 

TWO SEMESTERS (SIX DIVISIONS) 22^/2 WEEKS EACH 
JUNE 23 to MAY 28 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-1 


1st Semester 2d Semester 
Medical [ A Elec. (1); Ob.-Gyn. (2); Surg. (3). 
Section I Comprehensive { B Surg. (1); Elec. (2); Ob.-Gyn. (3). 
Care [ C Ob.-Gyn. (1); Surg. (2); Elec. (3). 

D Elec. (1); Ob.-Gyn. (2); Surg. (3). 1 Medical 
Section II E Surg. (1); Elec. (2); Ob.-Gyn. (3). \ Comprehensive 
F Ob.-Gyn. (1); Surg. (2); Elec. (3). j Care 


1-2 














2-3 






Psychiatry 








3-4 














4-5 


C.P.C. 




Special Lect. 











DETAILED SCHEDULE 
MEDICAL COMPREHENSIVE CARE 




Morning : 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


Group 

Mi 


Pediatrics 
Medicine 

Seminar 
Sp'ty Elec. 


Medicine 
Pediatrics 

Sp'ty Elec. 
Seminar 


Pediatrics 
Medicine 

Seminar 
Medicine S 


All Groups 
(9:00-10:00) 

Lecture 
(10:00-11:30) 

Medical 

Grand Rounds 

(12:00-1:00) 

Radiology 


Medicine 

Sp'ty Elec. 
Seminar 


All Groups 

Special 
Conference 


Afternoon: 


/ Seminar 
\ Pediatrics 
Sp'ty Elec. 

Psychiatry 
Medicine 


Sp'ty Elec. 

Seminar 

Medicine 
Psychiatry 


All Groups 
(2:00-3:00) 
Psychiatry 
(3:00-4:00) 

Com.CareConf 
(4:00-5:00) 

SpecialLecture 


Seminar 

Sp'ty Elec. 

Psychiatry 
Medicine 


Sp'ty Elec. 

/ Seminar 
\ Pediatrics 

Medicine 
Psychiatry 
(4.00-5.00) 
All Groups 
Pediatric 
Grand Rounds 





Groups I and II switch at the end of eleven weeks. 



Sloan-Kettering Division 
of Cornell University lAedical College 



BY AGREEMENT DATED June 16, 1950, between Cornell University, 
Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, Memorial Center for 
Cancer and Allied Diseases, and the Society of the New York Hospital, a 
graduate division of Cornell University Medical College was established 
to be known as the Sloan-Kettering Division of Cornell University Medi- 
cal College. 

While each party to the above agreement continues under control and 
management of its respective Board of Trustees or Managers, there is 
established a Coordinating Board of eight members, of which two shall 
be chosen by each of the parties to this agreement. This Board will act 
as a clearing house of information and as a coordinator of those func- 
tions in which all of the parties to this agreement are interested and will 
make recommendations to the respective Boards of the parties to the 
agreement. 

The Coordinating Board of the Sloan-Kettering Division of Cornell 
University Medical College consists at present of the following members: 

Representatives of Memorial Center 
Reginald G. Coombe Mrs. Albert D. Lasker 

Representatives of Sloan-Kettering Institute 
Frank A. Howard Lewis L. Strauss 

Representatives of Cornell University 
Arthur H. Dean, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees 
Deane W. Malott, President of the University 

Representatives of the Society of the New York Hospital 
John Hay Whitney Henry S. Sturgis 

FACULTY 

PROFESSORS 

OSCAR BODANSKY, Professor of Biochemistry. Attending CHnical Biochemist, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1921, Ph.D. 1925, Columbia; M.D. 1938, University 
of Chicago. [1946; 1951]) 

GEORGE B. BROWN, Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1934, Illinois Wesleyan; 
M.S. 1936, Ph.D. 1938, University of Illinois. [1939; 1951]) 

JOSEPH H. BURCHENAL, Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician, Memo- 
rial Hospital. (M.D. 1937, University of Pennsylvania. [1949; 1952]) 

THOMAS F. GALLAGHER, Professor of Biochemistry. (A.B. 1927, Fordham 
University; Ph.D. 1931, University of Chicago. [1951]) 

JENS NIELSEN, Visiting Professor of Radiology. Medical Director, Radium 

95 



96 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Center, Copenhagen. (B.A. 1917, Cathedral School, Ribe; M.D. 1923, Univer- 
sity of Copenhagen Medical School. [1952]) 
JAMES J. NICKSON, Professor of Radiology. Attending Radiation Therapist, 

Memorial Hospital. (B.S, 1936, University of Washington; M.D. 1940, Johns 

Hopkins. [1949; 1951]) 
LIEXRY T. RANDALL, Professor of Surgery. Clinical Director and Chief of 

Surgical Services, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1937, Princeton: M.D. 1941, Med. 

Sc.D. 1950, Columbia. [1950; 1951]) 
RULON W. RAWSON, Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician, Memorial 

Hospital. (M.B. 1937, M.D. 1938, Northwestern. [1948; 1951]) 
CORNELIUS P. RHOADS, Professor of Pathology. Director, Memorial Center 

for Cancer and AlHed Diseases. (A.B. 1920, Bowdoin; M.D. 1924, Harvard. 

[1941]) 
FRED W. STEWART, Professor of Pathology. Attending Pathologist, Memorial 

Hospital; Attending Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1916, Ph.D. 1919, 

Cornell; M.D. 1924, Harvard. [1928; 1949]) 
C. CHESTER STOCK, Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1932, Rose Polytechnic 

Institute; Ph.D. 1937, Johns Hopkins University; M.S. 1941, New York Uni- 
versity. [1951]) 
GEORGE W. WOOLLEY, Professor of Biology. (B.S. 1930, Iowa State College; 

M.S. 1931, Ph.D. 1935, University of Wisconsin. [1951]) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

ARTHUR C. ALLEN, Associate Professor of Pathology. Associate Attending 
Pathologist, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1931, M.D. 1936, University of Cali- 
fornia. [1951]) 

HAROLD BEYER, Associate Professor of Biophysics. (A.B. 1934, Ph.D. 1943, Co- 
lumbia University. [1951]) 

JOHN J. BIESELE, Associate Professor of Biology. (A.B. 1939, Ph.D. 1942, Uni- 
versity of Texas. [1950; 1952]) 

FRANK W. FOOTE, Jr., Associate Professor of Pathology. Attending Pathologist, 
Memorial Hospital; Associate Attending Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1931, M.D. 1935, University of Virginia. [1949]) 

DAVID A. KARNOFSKY, Associate Professor of Medicine. Associate Attending 
Physician, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1934, University of California; A.M. 1936, 
M.D. 1940, Stanford. [1949; 1952]) 

ALICE E. MOORE, Associate Professor of Biology. (A.B. 1930, A.M. 1935, Ohio 
State University; M.D. 1942, New York University College of Medicine. [1951]) 

OLOF H. PEARSON, Associate Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Physi- 
cian, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1934, M.D. 1939, Harvard University. [1949; 
1952]) 

MARY L. PETERMANN, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. (A.B. 1929, Smith 
College; Ph.D. 1939, University of Wisconsin. [1951]) 

FREDERICK S. PHILIPS, Associale Professor of Pharmacology. (A.B. 1936, Co- 
lumbia; Ph.D. 1940, Rochester. [1948; 1951]) 

DAVID PRESSMAN, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1937, Cahfornia 
Institute of Technology; M.A. 1938, University of California at Los Angeles; 
Ph.D. 1940, California Institute of Technology. [1951]) 

HOWARD L. RICHARDSON, Associate Professor of Pathology. Assistant At- 
tending Pathologist, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1936, College of Puget Sound; 
M.A. 1940; M.D. 1940, University of Oregon Medical School. [1952]) 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 
AARON BENDICH, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1939, College of 
the City of New York; Ph.D. 1946, Columbia University. [1952]) 



SLOAN-KETTERING DIVISION 97 

LIEBE F. CAVALIERI, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1943, M.S. 
1944, Ph.D. 1945, University of Pennsylvania. [1952]) 

PATRICK FITZGERALD, Assistant Professor of Pathology. Assistant Attending 
Pathologist, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1936, University of Massachusetts; M.D. 
1940, Tufts College Medical School. [1952]) 

DAVID K. FUKUSHIMA, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (A.B. 1939, Whit- 
tier College; A.M. 1943, University of California at Los Angeles; Ph.D. 1946, 
University of Rochester. [1952]) 

LEON D. HELLMAN, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Clinical Assistant in 
Medicine, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1941, Columbia University; M.D. 1945, 
Long Island College of Medicine; Med. Sc.D. 1951, Columbia University. 
[1952]) 

ROBERT C. MELLORS, Assistant Professor of Biology. Fellow in Pathology, Me- 
morial Hospital. (A.B. 1937, A.M. 1938, Ph.D. 1940, Western Reserve Univer- 
sity; M.D. 1944, Johns Hopkins University. [1952]) 

WILLIAM L. MONEY, Assistant Professor of Biology. (A.B. 1943, Brown Uni- 
versity; Ph.D. 1947, Harvard University. [1949; 1951]) 

H. CHRISTINE REILLY, Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. (B.S. 1941, New 
Jersey College for Women; Ph.D. 1946, Rutgers University. [1952]) 

PAUL M. ROLL, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1936, University of 
Santa Clara; M.A. 1942, Ph.D. 1947, Stanford University. [1952]) 

CHESTER M. SOUTHAM, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1941, M.S. 1943, University of Idaho; 
M.D. 1947, Columbia University. [1951; 1952]) 

SOPHIE SPITZ, Assistant Professor of Pathology. Assistant Attending Pathologist, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1929, M.D. 1932, Vanderbilt University. [1952]) 

HELENE W. TOOLAN, Assistant Professor of Pathology. (B.S. 1929, University 
of Chicago; Ph.D. 1946, Cornell University Medical College. [1952]) 

HELEN Q. WOODARD, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. Associate Attend- 
ing Biochemist, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1920, Stetson University; Ph.D. 1925, 
Columbia University. [1952]) 

EDUCATIONAL PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The facilities of the Sloan-Kettering Graduate Division consist of a 
thirteen story laboratory unit (Sloan-Kettering Institute) in direct con- 
nection with two hospitals — Memorial Hospital, a voluntary institution 
of 280 beds, and the James Ewing Hospital, a unit of the New York City 
hospital system with 270 beds. The Strang Clinic, another building in the 
unit, houses the work in preventive medicine in cancer. 

The type of training offered in this Division of the Medical College 
is primarily for candidates who are working toward an advanced degree. 
The plan of organization for teaching and research affords ample oppor- 
tunities for direct participation in investigative work on cancer and allied 
diseases in recognized divisions of the physical and biological sciences but 
not in any of the clinical fields such as medicine, pediatrics, and surgery. 
In addition to the conventional disciplines of biochemistry, biophysics, 
and pathology, a new department has been organized under the heading 
of "Biology and Growth." This department presents lectures and labora- 
tory work in the field of normal and neoplastic growth, which do not fall 
in the usual curricular divisions. 



98 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

OSCAR BODANSKY, Professor of Biochemistry. 

GEORGE W. BROWN, Professor of Biochemistry. 

THOMAS F. GALLAGHER, Professor of Biochemistry. 

MARY L. PETERMANN, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 

DAVID PRESSMAN, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 

AARON BENDICH, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

LIEBE F. CAVALIERI, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

DAVID K. FUKUSHIMA, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

PAUL M. ROLL, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

HELEN Q. WOODARD, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

EARL BALIS, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

H. LEON BRADLOW, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

ESTELLA KATZENELLENBOGEN, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

LEONHARD KORNGOLD, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

THEODORE H. KRITCHEVSKY, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

NORMA LEEDS, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

ROBERT ROSENFELD, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

MAX SCHLAMOWITZ, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

MALCOLM SIEGEL, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

ROBERT E. NEUMAN, Instructor in Biochemistry. 

KATHLEEN R. ROBERTS, Instructor in Biochemistry. 

C. T. BEER, Research Fellow in Biochemistry. 

ATTALLAH KAPPAS, Research Fellow in Biochemistry. 

IVAN I. SALAMON, Research Fellow in Biochemistry. 

RUDOLF SCHNEIDER, Research Fellow in Biochemistry. 

ALBERT H. SOLOWAY, Research Fellow in Biochemistry. 

HERBERT WEINFELD, Research Fellow in Biochemistry. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Special work may be undertaken in the fields of electrolyte metabolism, 
enzymology, immunochemistry, protein and nucleoprotein chemistry and 
metabolism, and the chemistry and metabolism of steroids by arrange- 
ment with the appropriate member of the department. 

BIOLOGY AND GROWTH 

CORNELIUS P. RHOADS, Professor of Pathology. 

C. CHESTER STOCK, Professor of Biochemistry. 

GEORGE W. WOOLLEY, Professor of Biology. 

JOHN J. BIESELE, Associate Professor of Biology. 

ALICE E. MOORE, Associate Professor of Biology. 

FREDERICK S. PHILIPS, Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 

ROBERT MELLORS, Assistant Professor of Biology. 

WILLIAM L. MONEY, Assistant Professor of Biology. 

H. CHRISTINE REILLY, Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 

HELENE W. TOOLAN, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

CHARLOTTE FRIEND, Research Associate in Bacteriology. 

ROBERT GUTHRIE, Research Associate in Bacteriology. 

DONALD A. CLARKE, Instructor in Pharmacology. 

A. R. T. DENUES, Instructor in Biology. 

MARGARET HARLAND, Instructor in Anatomy. 

DORRIS J. HUTCHISON, Instructor in Bacteriology. 

JOHN A. JACQUEZ, Instructor in Biology. 

AUDREY FJELDE, Research Fellow in Bacteriology. 



SLOAN-KETTERING DIVISION 99 



ELECTIVE COURSES 



Investigative facilities are available for studies in pharmacology, mi- 
crobiology, endocrinology, genetics, and virology as related to the ini- 
tiation and grow^th of various types of cancer. Training will be given in 
the special procedures used in experimental cancer chemotherapy. Ar- 
rangements for the desired type of work may be made with the appropri- 
ate member of the department. 

BIOPHYSICS 
HAROLD BEYER, Associate Professor of Biophysics. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Facilities are available for training in radiologic physics (including 
high energy phenomena), radiobiology, tracer work (stable and radioac- 
tive), radioautography, soft X-ray absorption, electronics, and theory 
and practice of radiation detection. Arrangements may be made with the 
department head. 

MEDICINE 

RULON W. RAWSON, Professor of Medicine. 
JOSEPH H. BURCHENAL, Professor of Medicine. 
DAVID A. KARNOFSKY, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
OLOF H. PEARSON, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
LEON D. HELLMAN, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
CHESTER M. SOUTHAM, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
HARVEY S. COLLINS, Research Associate in Medicine. 
VINCENT P. HOLLANDER, Research Associate in Medicine. 
RAYMOND W. HOUDE, Research Associate in Medicine. 
HENRY J. KOCH, Jr., Research Associate in Medicine. 
CHARLES D. WEST, Research Associate in Medicine. 
ROSE-RUTH ELLISON, Instructor in Medicine. 
GEORGE C. ESCHER, Instructor in Medicine. 
M. LOIS MURPHY, Instructor in Medicine. 
MARTIN SONENBERG, Instructor in Medicine. 
MARGUERITE SYKES, Instructor in Medicine. 
DAVID V. BECKER, Research Fellow in Medicine. 
LEONARD D. HAMILTON, Research Fellow in Medicine. 
LOUIS A. LEONE, Research Fellow in Medicine. 
MORTIMER L. MENDELSOHN, Research Fellow in Medicine. 
JAMES W. POPPELL, Research Fellow in Medicine. 
DOROTHY WEBER SVED, Research Fellow in Medicine. 
SHIRLEY WEISENFELD, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Elective courses lasting two to four months are available for fourth 
year students to work in the sections of clinical investigation. The follow- 
ing courses are offered by the Division of Clinical Investigation: 

1. Hematology. A maximum of two students can be accepted. 

2. Isotopic technics in medicine. A maximum of two students can be 
accepted. 



100 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

3. Metabolic methods in clinical medicine. One student can be ac- 
cepted. 

4. Thyroid physiology. A maximum of two students can be accepted. 

5. A series of lectures on the natural history of various types of neo- 
plastic disease and on the medical management of cancer presented by 
the medical neoplasia and chemotherapy services. 

A maximum of four students can be accepted for training in the tech- 
nics of evaluating chemotherapeutic agents in cancer, through the care 
of the patients on the wards and in the outpatient department, and by 
participation in the weekly service conferences. 

PATHOLOGY 

FRED W. STEWART, Professor of Pathology. 
ARTHUR C. ALLEN, Associate Professor of Pathology. 
FRANK W. FOOTE, Jr., Associate Professor of Pathology. 
HOWARD RICHARDSON, Associate Professor of Pathology. 
PATRICK FITZGERALD, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
SOPHIE SPITZ, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
STEPHEN S. STERNBERG, Research Associate in Pathology. 
DOUGLAS SUNDERLAND, Research Associate in Pathology. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Fourth year medical students are accepted for elective work in tumor 
pathology for periods of one month or longer at any time through special 
arrangement. Such students are assigned to a graduate Fellow in path- 
ology who will serve as tutor. They shall observe and assist at autopsies 
and examination of gross surgical specimens, and microscopic diagnosis; 
they shall attend weekly clinicopathologic conferences and departmental 
conferences. Formal lectures are not offered. A microscope is required. 

RADIOLOGY 

JAMES J. NICKSON, Professor of Radiology. 
JENS NIELSEN, Visiting Professor of Radiology. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

1. Lectures in Radiation Therapy. Thursday afternoons, 5-6, January 
through April. 

2. Lectures in Radiological Physics. Wednesday afternoons, 5-6, Jan- 
uary through April. 

3. Lectures in Radiobiology. Monday afternoons, 5:30-6:30, January 
through April. 

In addition, elective students will be taken for a period of three months 
for half-time work in laboratory investigations of the effect of ionizing 
radiations on biological material. This course will be arranged after in- 
terview only. 



SLOAN-KETTERING DIVISION 101 

SURGERY 
HENRY T. RANDALL, Professor of Surgery. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Opportunities are available for clinical investigation in problems of 
metabolism, particularly in water and electrolyte metabolism and renal 
function as related to surgical problems. There are special facilities for 
animal studies in experimental surgery and surgical physiology pertain- 
ing to problems of major surgery in the cancer field. Arrangements may 
be made with the department head. 



Internship AppointmentSj 
Class of 1952 



DOCTORS OF MEDICINE, JUNE 11, 1952 



Irwin Alan Almenoff 
James Douglas Alway, Jr. 
Julius Joseph Baber 
John Hart Balise 
Gerald Samuel Barad 
John Weldon Bellville 
Irving Myron Blatt 
Louis Bove 
Robert Jay Moyer 
John Wickliff Bromley 
Norman Slingerland Buys 
Arthur Stephen Carlson 
William Anderson Coleman 
John Michael Connolly 
William Cooper 
William Lloyd Craver 
Raymond Joseph Donovan 
Lester Mahan Felton 
Peter Jay Fennel 
Charles Pennock Foote 
George William Frimpter 
James Clark Gammill 
Thomas Aquinas Gilday 
Roy Glasgow Gill 
David Goebel 
Waldo Greenspan 
J. Douglas Hallock 
Leon Irving Hammer 
Leston Laycock Havens 
William Norbert Hill, Jr. 
Russell Sherman Hoxsie 
Joseph Kantor Indenbaum 
William Arthur Jamison 
George Johnson, Jr. 
Theodore Inslae Jones 
Martin David Keller 
Thomas Killip, HI 
John Francis Kurtzke 
John Rudolf Langstadt 
John Unger Lanman 
Frederic William Lathrop, Jr. 
Robert Earl Lee 
Richard Lennihan, Jr. 



Montefiore Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Virginia Mason Hospital, Seattle, Wash. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn. 

Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Minneapolis General Hospital, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Kings County Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

State University Medical Center, Syracuse, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Maine General Hospital, Portland, Maine 

Kings County Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Walter Reed Hospital, Washington, D.C. 

Geisinger Hospital, Danville, Pa. 

Kings County Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

St. Luke's Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Montefiore Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn. 

Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, R.I. 

Los Angeles County Hospital, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Kings County Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

Kings County Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

City of Detroit Receiving, Detroit, Mich. 

Muhlenberg Hospital, Plainfield, N.J. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

University of Virginia Hospital, Charlottesville, Va. 

102 



INTERNSHIP APPOINTMENTS 



103 



Roy Hilty Lucas 
Keith McLoud 
Franklin Bruce Merrill 
Audrey Wilkins Mertz 
James Lawrence Mertcz 
John Andrew Mitchell 
Ralph Bryan Moore, Jr. 
David Marten Niceberg 
Sterling Wallace Obenour, 
Charles William Parton 
Russel Hugo Patterson, Jr. 
Walter Leon Peretz 
Richard Earl Perkins 
Clinton Burns Potter 
Peter Peter Poulos 
Arthur George Prangley, Jr, 
Ricardo Enrique Rengel 
Burton Rubin 
Herbert Simeon Sacks 
Willis Sanderson 
Edwin Colby Sevringhaus 
Lewis Shenker 
George Seamon Shields 
Stuart Robinson Silver 
Peter Edwin Stokes 
Frank Joseph Sullivan 
Bernard Edwin Swanson 
Frank Bell Throop 
James David Van Doren 
Alan Van Poznak 
Robert Morris Wagner 
Elizabeth Barrows Watson 
Virginia Davidson Weeks 
Richard Jay Weishaar 
Sidney Lee Werkman 
Robert Edward Wieche 
Herbert Ambrose Zaccheo 



University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio 

Albany Hospital, Albany, N.Y. 

Colorado General Hospital, Denver, Colo. 

St. Vincent's Hospital, Portland, Ore. 

St. Vincent's Hospital, Portland, Ore. 

University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio 

Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

Maimonides Hospital, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Jr. University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio 

University of Virginia Hospital, Charlottesville, Va. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, R.I. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, N.Y. 

Grace-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Conn. 

White Cross Hospital, Columbus, Ohio 

Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, N.Y. 

Indianapolis General Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bryn Mawr Hospital, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Norwegian Lutheran Hospital, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

University of Virginia Hospital, Charlottesville, Va. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Geisinger Hospital, Danville, Pa. 



I 



Register of StudentSj 1952-53 



FOURTH YEAR 

Charles Peter Albright, A.B. 1949, Allegheny College 

John Symington Aldridge, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Kenneth Collett Archibald, St. Lawrence University 

Frank Myrick Ash, A.B. 1949, Williams College 

Bennett Barton, A.B. 1949, Princeton University 

Barbara Bates, A.B. 1949, Smith College 

Stephen Lamar Bennett, B.S. 1949, Queens College 

Richard Harrod Blank, Emory University 

David Myron Bloom, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

David Albert Blumenstock, B.S. 1949, Union College 

John Benjamin Branche, B.S. 1949, Queens College 

Carl Hannibal Brennan, Jr., A.B. 1949, University of Maine 

Robert Woods Brown, A.B. 1949, DePauw University 

Frederick William Campbell, A.B. 1949, Yale University 

David Ignatius Canavan, A.B. 1949, St. Peter's College 

Arthur Chandler, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

George Tanner Conger, B.S. 1948, University of Akron 

Earnest M. Curtis, Jr., B.S. 1949, University of Alabama 

Elizabeth Vasihki Despina Coryllos, A.B. 1949, Barnard College 

Richard La Vern Dexter, B.S. 1949, Albright College 

John Phillips Dorst, Pomona College 

Robert Harrison Edwards, A.B. 1949, University of North Carolina 

Harold J. Ellner, A.B. 1950, Cornell University New York,' N.Y. 

Lawrence Mance Ervin, B.S. 1946, College of the City of New York New York, N.Y. 



Alexandria, Va, 

New York, N.Y. 

White Plains, N.Y. 

Ridgewood, N.J. 

Douglaston, N.Y. 

Auburn, N.Y. 

Queens Village, N.Y. 

Tampa, Fla. 

Binghamton, N.Y. 

South Orange, N.J. 

Jamaica, N.Y. 

Bangor, Maine 

Elkhart, Ind. 

Gross Pointe Farms, Mich. 

Ridgefield Park, N.J. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Akron, Ohio 

Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

New York, N.Y. 

Wellsboro, Pa. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 



Ames Lawrence Filippone, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Marvin Irving Fox, A.B. 1948, Cornell University; M.S. 1949 

University of Chicago 
Julia Louise Freitag, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
Catherine Bradford Friedrich, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
George Ripley Fuller, Swarthmore College 
John Donald Gallagher, B.S. 1949, Fordham College 
Aaron Ganz, A.B. 1949, New York University 
Robert DeForcst Gens, A.B. 1949, Hamilton College 
Stanley Erwin Goodman, B.S. 1947, Trinity College; 

M.A. 1949, University of Pennsylvania 
William Anthony Grattan, B.S. 1949, Union College 
Robert Sherman Grayson, A.B. 1950, Cornell Univ^ersity 
Richard Stuart Green, A.B. 1949, Swarthmore College 
Ward Orin GrifTen, Jr., A.B. 1948, Princeton University 
Peter Daniel Guggenheim, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
Charles Lee Heiskell, Jr., B.S. 1947, The Citadel 
William Howard Hover, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
Richard Hills James, B.S. 1949, Columbia University 
Ira Hartley Kaufman, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
William Thomas Kelly, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
Calvin Murray Kunin, A.B. 1949, Columbia University 

104 



Newark, N.J. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Hope Farm, N.Y. 

Red Wing, Minn. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Queens Village, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Floral Park, N.Y. 

Norwalk, Conn. 

Grafton, N.Y. 

Harrison, N.J. 

Flushing, N.Y. 

Pelham Manor, N.Y. 

Islip, N.Y. 

Pasadena, Calif. 

Montclair, N.J. 

Pelham, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Ithaca, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



105 



Norfolk, Va. 
Plattsburg, N.Y. 

Upper Montclair, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Zanesville, Ohio 

Charleston, W. Va. 

Poland, Ohio 

Florence, S.C. 

Richmond, Mass. 

Pocatello, Idaho 

Greenwich, Conn. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BaUinger, Texas 

Lynbrook, N.Y. 

Concordia, Kansas 

Niles, Ohio 

York, Pa. 



James Mendon Ludwig, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Milton Norman Luria, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
Charles Wright MacMiUan, Jr., A.B. 1950, 

Cornell University 
Peter Raoul Mahrer, A.B. 1949, Brooklyn College 
Charles Anthony Malone, A.B. 1949, Oberlin College 
Richard Francis Mattingly, A.B. 1949, Ohio State University 
Robert Emmet McCabe, Jr., A.B. 1948, Williams College 
John Paul McCreary, Cornell University 
Allen Walter Mead, B.S. 1949, Davidson College 
Thomas Spurr Morse, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Jay Richard Olsen, B.S. 1949, Idaho State College 
Robert Heyde Orth, A.B. 1949, Hamilton College 
Jack Flemming Ostergaard, A.B. 1949, Dartmouth College 
Charles Wellington Pearcc, Rice Institute 
Joseph Edward Plastaras, B.S. 1949, Manhattan College 
Richard Fleming Porter, A.B. 1949, University of Kansas 
Arnold Henry Randell, Jr., A.B. 1949, Kenyon College 
James Leon Reichard, B.S. 1949, Franklin and Marshall 
Jack Richard, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Wilham Kay Riker, A.B. 1949, Columbia University 
Harlan David Root, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Henry George Schmidt, Jr., Duke University 
Abraham Isaac Schweid, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Richard Tobias Silver, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Gerald Murray Silverman, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Paul Albert Skudder, A.B. 1949, Middlebury College 
David ElHott Sobel, A.B. 1949, University of North Carolina 
Charles Albert Stevens, Jr., A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
James Strickler, A.B. 1950, Dartmouth College 
Philip Tager, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
Thomas Lee Taylor, B.S. 1949, University of Maryland 
Paul Richard Thornfeldt, A.B. 1949, Montana State University 
Kenneth Fredric Tucker, B.S. 1949, Columbia University 
Clifford Hohnholt Urban, A.B. 1949, Columbia University 
Heinz Valtin, A.B. 1949, Swarthmore College 
Richard Paul Wagner, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
Richard Wellman, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
Florence Arlene Wilson, A.B. 1949, Cornell University 
Edward Albert Wolfson, A.B. 1948, M.N.S. 1949, Cornell University Fairlawn, N.J 
Bernard Arthur Yabhn, A.B. 1948, Cornell University Watertown, N.Y 



N.Y. 
N.Y. 
N.Y. 
N.J. 
N.Y. 
N.Y. 
N.Y. 



New York, 

New York, 

Riders Mills, 

East Orange 

New York, 

Lake Mahopac, 

Forest Hills, 

New Rochelle, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Westfield, N.J. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

New York, N.Y. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Helena, Mont. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Astoria, N.Y. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hurley, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Binghamton, N.Y. 



THIRD YEAR 

Fredrick Ralph Abrams, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Ronald Hunt Allen, B.S. 1950, Fordham University 

Eugene Antelis, A.B. 1950, New York University 

Nancy Carolynn Arnold, A.B. 1950, Vassar College 

James Hartford Arthur, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Wilmot Coles Ball, Jr., B.E. 1949, Johns Hopkins University 

Douglas Holmes Barns, B.S. 1950, St. Lawrence University 

Robert Leonard Beals, A.B. 1950, University of Maine 

Richard Percival Bigelow, A.B. 1951, University of Utah 

Sumner Theodore Bohee, B.S. 1950, Franklin and Marshall College Lancaster, Pa 

Kenneth Neubauer Bredesen, A.B., B.S. 1952, 

University of Minnesota Edina, Minn 



Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Teaneck, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Meadville, Pa. 

Ridgewood, N.J. 

Redwood, N.J. 

Skowhegan, Maine 

Provo, Utah 



106 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Harold Thomas Brew, Jr., A.B. 1950, Middlebury College New York, N.Y. 

John Robert Buchanan, A.B. 1950, Amherst College Fair Haven, N.J. 

Harry Edwin Cassel, A.B. 1950, Cornell University Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hillary Anthony Chollct, A.B. 1950, Cornell University New Orleans, La. 

Theodore Avery Collier, B.S. 1950, Beloit College New Canaan, Conn. 

Richard Warwick Dame, A.B. 1950, Cornell University Beechhurst, N.Y. 

Harry Warren Daniell, A.B. 1950, Cornell University Millinocket, Maine 

George Dermksian, A.B. 1948, M.A. 1950, Columbia University New York, N.Y. 
Louis Joseph Dougherty, Jr., A.B. 1950, Yale University Rockville Center, N.Y. 

Thomas Allen Edwards, A.B. 1950, Williams College Scarsdale, N.Y. 

David Eiscnberg, A.B. 1950, Cornell University Rochester, N.Y. 

Henry Ralph Erie, A.B. 1950, Cornell University New York, N.Y. 

Seneca Lawrence Erman, B.S. 1949, 

College of the City of New York West Hempstead, N.Y. 

Harrison Hatheway Farley, A.B. 1950, Westminster College Alton, Illinois 

James Charles Ford, B.S. 1950, Iowa State College Boone, Iowa 

Claude Ellis Forkner, Jr., A.B. 1949, Harvard University New York, N.Y. 

Walter Lewis Freedman, A.B. 1950, DePauw University New York, N.Y. 

Richard Theron Furr, A.B. 1950, University of Mississippi Aberdeen, Miss. 

Eugene David Furth, A.B. 1950, Wesleyan University Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

William Henry Gordon, Jr., B.S.E. 1947, University of Michigan; 

M.A. 1949, Columbia University Detroit, Mich. 

William Charles Herbert Grimm, Jr., A.B. 1950, Syracuse University Garfield, N.J. 
Myron Roberts Grover, Jr., A.B. 1950, Bowdoin College Scarsdale, N.Y. 

John Fowler Gustafson, A.B. 1950, Bowdoin College Laconia, N.H. 

James Charles Hart, B.S. 1950, University of Arizona Prescott, Ariz. 

John Kenneth Herd, B.S. 1950, Rutgers University Metuchen, N.J. 

Alfred Turnbull Holt, A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College West Hartford, Conn. 

Richard James Homrighausen, A.B. 1950, Princeton University Princeton, N.J. 

Kenneth Andrew Hubel, A.B. 1950, University of Rochester Rye, N.Y. 

Edwin Max Jacobs, A.B. 1950, Reed College San Francisco, Cahf. 

David Morrison Johnson, Jr., A.B. 1950, 

Ohio Wesleyan University Columbus, Ohio 

Norman Wolf Keller, A.B. 1950, Colgate University Tuckahoe, N.Y. 

Melvin James King, A.B. 1950, Brown University Pawtucket, R.I. 

John Joseph Knightly, A.B. 1950, St. Peter's College Jersey City, N.J. 

Urick Michael Krasnopolsky, B.S. 1947, 

University of Oregon Jackson Heights, N.Y. 

Herbert Andre Kroeze, Jr., B.S. 1950, University of Mississippi Jackson, Miss. 

Richard Kindell Lansche, B.S. 1950, Northwestern University St. Louis, Mo. 

David HilHs Law, IV, A.B. 1950, Cornell University Glendale, Calif. 

Bruce Carl Levy, A.B. 1950, Cornell University Katonah, N.Y. 

Donald Irvan Matern, A.B. 1950, Wesleyan University Worcester, Mass. 

Andrew James McElhinney, Jr., B.S. 1950, Holy Cross College Pelham, N.Y. 

Cornelius Irving Meeker, A.B. 1950, Middlebury College Plainfield, N.J. 

Charles Donald Meier, A.B. 1950, Duke University Alexandria, Va. 

Thomas Harry Meikle, Jr., A.B. 1951, Cornell University Troy, Pa. 

Edward Stephen Mongan, A.B. 1950, Cornell University Richmond Hill, N.Y. 

William Edward Morse, B.S, 1950, University of Michigan Kew Gardens, N.Y. 

James Wilson Mosley, A.B. 1950, University of Texas Austin, Texas 

Philip Robert Nast, A.B. 1950, Washington and Jefferson College Butler, Pa. 

Nicholas Macy Nelson, B.S. 1950, Yale University Frankhn Park, N.J. 

Graham Dougald Newton, B.S. 1950, Davidson College Faison, N.C. 

Robert Augustine Newton, A.B. 1950, Amherst College Newton Center, Mass. 

Marion Ida Neilsen, A.B. 1950, Barnard College ^ Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Paul Fordham Nugent, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell University East Hampton, N.Y. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



107 



Alan Stimson Paterson, B.S. 1950, Yale University 
Robert Chester Patten, B.S. 1950, Davidson College 
John Emerick Peterson, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
George Flory Pritchard, A.B. 1950, Williams College 
Robert Dean Quinn, A.B. 1950, Stanford University 
John Frank Rose, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell Univ^ersity 
Michael Sander Rost, A.B. 1950, Colgate University 
Robert Chase Runyon, A.B. 1950, Columbia University 
Saul Leonard Sanders, A.B. 1950, Kenyon College 
Paul Sherlock, B.S. 1950, Queens College 
Robert Ellis Shope, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Robert Perry Singer, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
John Richard Slattery, B.S. 1950, St. Peter's College 
Thornton Maxwell Stearns, A.B. 1950, Yale University 
Nathalie AHce Strahan, A.B. 1950, Wellesley College 
xA.nn Patricia Sullivan, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Corbet Harold Turner, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
William Adam \^incent, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Warren Whaley Warbasse, A.B. 1950, Princeton University 
James Carl Warenski, B.S. 1950, University of Utah 
Ralph Chester Williams, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

SECOND YEAR 

John Vincent Abbott, Jr., A.B. 1950, University of Iowa 
Ronald Alfred Arky, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Thane Asch, B.S. 1951, Columbia University 
Robert Coleman Atkins, A.B. 1951, University of Michigan 
William Sinclair Augerson, A.B. 1949, Bowdoin College 
Stephen McCHntock Ayres, A.B. 1951, Gettysburg College 
David Baum, A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 
Edwin Lawrence Bierman, A.B. 1951, Brooklyn College 
Robert Sunderlin Brittain, A.B. 1951, Colgate University 
John Lyman Brown, Jr., A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Harry Gray Browne, A.B. 1951, Yale University 
Joseph Anthony Buda, A.B. 1951, Columbia University 
Donald John Cameron, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 
lola Gracey Case, A.B. 1951, Vanderbilt University 
John Paul Clayton, A.B. 1951, Middlebury College 
Joseph Patrick Dineen, B.S. 1950, Fordham Univ-ersity 
Kemp Berner Doersch, A.B. 1951, Stanford University 
Richard Irwin Dudley, A.B. 1950, Cornell University; 

M.A. 1951, Emory University 
Maurice Everette Dyer, A.B. 1951, Columbia University 
Robert Richard Engisch, B.S. 1951, Union College 
Howard Marvin Feinstein, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Terence Patrick Fogarty, A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 
Charles Frederick Frey, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 
Sorrell Newton Glover, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Stanley Martin Hanfling, A.B. 1951, Columbia University 
Paul Allen Hansch, A.B. 1948, Pomona College 
Maury Lloyd Hanson, A.B. 1951, Oberlin College 
WilHam FlilHs, A.B. 1951, Wesleyan University 
Charles Hoffman, Jr., A.B. 1951, Yale University 
Milton Hollenberg, A.B. 1951, Brooklyn College 
Charles Edward Hollerman, B.S. 1951, Allegheny College 



Rochester, N.Y. 

Miami, Fla. 

Bethesda, Md. 

Bangor, Pa. 

Stanford, Calif. 

Montclair, N.J. 

Orange, N.J. 

Springfield, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Kingston, N.J. 

Middletown, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

East Orange, N.J. 

Maplewood, N.J. 

Rhinebeck, N.Y. 

East St. Louis, 111. 

Owego, N.Y. 

East Orange, N.J. 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

Chevy Chase, Md. 



East Paterson, N.J, 

New Brunswick, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Dayton, Ohio 

Ellenville, N.Y. 

Westfield, N.J. 

Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Spencerport, N.Y. 

PaHsade, N.J. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Fort Lee, N.J. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Mineola, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Carmichael, Calif. 

New York, N.Y. 

W'eston, Mo. 

Elizabeth, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Jamaica, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Greenwich, Conn. 

Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Turtle Creek, Pa. 



108 



CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 



Gilbert Dolan Huebncr, A.B. 1951, Harvard University South Orange, NJ. 

Reginald Harned Isele, A.B. 1951, Princeton University Perth Amboy, N.J. 

Martin George Jacobs, B.S. 1951, Franklin and Marshall College Orange, N.J. 



Kenneth Myron Jensen, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Hiram Kendall, Jr., A.B. 1951, Harvard University 
Kent Gordon Kimball, A.B. 1951, Yale University 
Peter Tamas Knoepflcr, B.S. 1950, California Institute of 

Technology; M.A. 1951, Columbia University 
Joseph White Landau, .\.B. 1951, Cornell University 
John Beuclcr Lange, B.S. 1951, Franklin and Marshall College 
Richard Charles Lippincott, A.B. 1951, Williams College 
Richard Rowland Lower, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 
Lester Andrus Ludlow, A.B. 1951, Brigham Young University 
Robert Burnett McGandy, A.B. 1951, Harvard University 
Lowell Gilmore McLellan, B.S. 1951, Rutgers University 
Herman Richard Matern, A.B. 1949, Concordia Seminary 
Gunter Richard Meng, B.S. 1951, Cornell University 
Walter Alexander Murray, Jr., A.B. 1952, Columbia University 
Wilham Alexander Neill, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 
James Franklin Oates, III, A.B. 1951, Princeton L'niversity 
Artemis George Pazianos, A.B. 1951, Wellesley College 
John Henry Per-Lee, A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 
Franklin Hewit PfeifTenberger, A.B, 1951, Yale University 
John Greenwood Pierik, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Guy Downs Plunkett, B.S. 1951, Rutgers University 
James William Preuss, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
John Vincent Price, B.S. 1951, St. John's College 
Cedric Joseph Priebe, Jr., B.S. 1951, Fordham University 
Brian O'Malley Quinn, B.S. 1951, College of the Holy Cross 
Robert Edward Rentz, B.S. 1951, Trinity College 
Donald Paul Regula, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Roland Whan Richmond, A.B. 1951, Bethany College 
Nancy Bernadine Ripley, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Ronald Stanley Romig, B.S. 1951, Albright College 
John Ross, Jr., A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 
Leslie Eugene Rudolf, Jr., B.S. 1951, Union College 
Steven Schenker, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Miles Harold Sigler, A.B. 1951, University of Rochester 
John Harrison Sipple, Jr., A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Herbert Jarvis Sorensen, A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 
Frank George Standaert, A.B. 1951, Harvard University 
Paul Stucki, Jr., A.B. 1951, Hamilton College 
John Bernard Sullivan, B.S. 1951, Manhattan College 
Frederick Gregg Thompson, III, A.B. 1951, Yale University 
William Richard Thompson, A.B. 1951, University of Maine 
Wolodymyr Tyschenko, Columbia University 
WilHam Webb Van Stone, A.B. 1951, Swarthmore College 
Herbert Getty Vaughan, Jr., B.S. 1951, McGill University 
Frank James Veith, A.B, 1952, Cornell University 
Jane Harrison Walker, A.B. 1951, Bryn Mawr College 
Willard Travell Weeks, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 
Morton Raymond Weinstein, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
David Sanborn Wilcox, A.B. 1951, Williams College 
Edward Percy Williams, A.B. 1951, Bowdoin College 



Ithaca, N,Y, 

Westerly, R.I. 

Greenwich, Conn, 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

Teancck, N.J, 

Guilford, Conn. 

Detroit, Mich, 

Spanish Fork, Utah 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Woodbridge, N.J. 

Worcester, Mass. 

Ithaca, N.Y. 

Knoxville, Tenn. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Lake Forest, III. 

Manchester, Conn, 

Larchmont, N,Y. 

Alton, 111. 

Providence, R.I. 

Bound Brook, N.J, 

Binghamton, N.Y. 

Belle Harbor, N,Y. 

Jackson Heights, N.Y. 

Rochester, N,Y. 

West Hartford, Conn, 

Westwood, N.J. 

Nutley, N.J. 

Staten Island, N.Y. 

Reading, Pa. 

Bronxville, N.Y, 

Pelham, N.Y, 

New York, N,Y, 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

Lakewood, Ohio 

Summit, N.J, 

Paterson, N.J. 

West New York, N.Y. 

Long Island City, N,Y, 

St. Joseph, Mo. 

Livermore Falls, Me. 

New York, N.Y, 

Denver, Colo, 

Pelham, N.Y. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Hartford, Conn. 

Linneus, Me, 



I 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



109 



FIRST YEAR 



Elizabeth, X.J. 

Columbus, Ohio 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Cape Elizabeth, Me. 

Wayzata, Minn. 



Robert Richard Abel, A.B. 1952, Princeton University 
Donald Elliott Allen, B.S. 1952, Ohio State University 
Richard Allen Antell, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
William Henry Austin, A.B. 1952, Bowdoin College 
Archibald Hildreth Beard, Jr., B.S. 1952, Williams College 
Charles Henry Beckmann, B.S. 1952, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Elliott EUias BHnderman, B.S. 1952, 

College of the City of New York 
Dana Charles Brooks, B.E.E. 1949, Cornell University 
Bertram S. Brown, B.S. 1952, Brooklyn College 
Harry Martin Butler, Jr., A.B. 1952, Denison University 
Clarence Elton Cahow, Jr., B.S. 1952, Davidson College 
Paul Daniel Carter, B.S. 1951, Wheaton College 
Philip Kenneth Carter, Jr., A.B. 1952, Wheaton College 
Don Frederick Choquette, A.B. 1952, University of California 
Jay Norman Cohn, B.S. 1952, Union College 
Thomas William Cook, A.B. 1952, Princeton University 
William Charles Cooper, Franklin & Marshall College 
Charles Eugene Davis, B.S. 1952, Arizona State College 
Lee Washington Davis, A.B. 1952, Amherst College 
John Whitlow Delano, B.S. 1952, Rutgers University 
Harvey Bruce Denson, Cornell University 
Herbert Alban Dietzel, A.B. 1952, Colgate University 
Ronald Joseph Dorris, A.B. 1952, Harvard University 
John Wilson Espy, Franklin & Marshall College 
Robert Slora Fackler, A.B. 1952, University of Rochester 
William Rush Fackler, A.B. 1952, University of Rochester 
Donald Peter Feeney, B.S. 1952, College of the Holy Cross 
Frank Bartley Flood, B.S. 1952, Manhattan College 
Rulon Newell Ford, B.S. 1952, University of Utah 
John Christian Frank, B.S. 1952, University of Arizona 
Ivan B. Gendzel, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Sidney Goldstein, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Jack Goodman, A.B. 1952, American International College 
Joseph Gra>'zel, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
David Bruce Hayt, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Warren Herbert Higgins, Jr., A.B. 1952, Yale University 
Robert James Hubsmith, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
David McClure Iszard, A.B. 1952, Bowdoin College 
Jerome Lee Jacobs, B.S. 1952, Queens College 
Ramon Rafael Joseph, B.S. 1952, Manhattan College 
Albert Zaven Kapikian, B.S. 1952, Queens College 
James Sanford Ketchum, A.B. 1952, Columbia University 
Donaldson Wright Kingsley, Jr., A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Stanley Joshua Landau, Cornell University 
Arthur Maurice Levy, A.B. 1952, Har\'ard University 
David Beekley Lyon, A.B. 1952, University of Mississippi 
Sherburne Merrill Macfarlan, A.B. 1952, Lafayette College 
Donald Fred Mahnke, B.S. 1952, University of Wyoming 
Edward Joseph Margulies, B.S. 1952, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 
James Hamilton Mason, A.B. 1952, DePauw University Evanston, 111, 



St. Albans, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Orlando, Florida 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Newark, Ohio 

Fort Pierce, Florida 

Plainfield, N.J. 

Plainfield, N.J. 

Long Beach, Calif. 

Schenectady, N.Y. 

Westfield, N.J. 

Erie, Pa. 

Miami, Arizona 

Summit, N.J. 

Mountainside, N.J. 

Hackensack, N.J. 

Lakewood, N.J. 

New York N.Y. 

Brookville, Pa. 

Oak Park, 111. 

Oak Park, 111. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Forest Hills, N.Y. 

Farmington, Utah 

Tucson, Arizona 

New York, N.Y. 

Utica, N.Y. 

Springfield, Mass. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Great Neck, 

Honolulu, 

Passaic, 

Elmira, 

New York, 

Woodside, 

Flushing, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Hastings, Nebr. 

Ccdarhurst, N.Y. 

Saranac Lake, N.Y. 

University, Miss. 

Hawthorne, N.J. 

Keeline, Wyoming 



N.Y. 
T.H. 
N.J. 
N.Y. 
N.Y. 
N.Y. 



no 



CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 



Richard Key Mead, A.B. 1952, Havcrford College Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Mitchell Mills, A.B. 1952, Princeton University Washington, D.C. 

Aubrey Stinson Miree, III, B.S. 1952, Davidson College Birmingham, Ala. 
Mildred Downs Moore, A.B. 1950, Barnard College; M.A. 1952, 

Mount Holyoke College Chatham, N.J. 

Gerald Terence Moran, A.B. 1952, Cornell University Bronxville, N.Y. 

Robert Roland Morgan, B.S. 1952, St. John's College Flushing, N.Y. 

William Alfred Morgan, Jr., A.B. 1952, Cornell University Claymont, Dela. 

Burton Albert Nault, A.B. 1952, Bov^doin College Exeter, N.H. 

Joan Nesmith, xAl.B. 1952, Cornell University Garden City, N.Y. 

Mary Alice Ncwhall, A.B. 1952, Cornell University Ithaca, N.Y. 
Joseph Oren, Cornell University Kew Gardens Hills, N.Y. 



Saverio Joseph Pansarino, A.B. 1952, Columbia University 

Carl Black Pollock, Jr., A.B. 1952, Cornell University 

John Henry Prunier, A.B. 1952, Colgate University 

Albin Walter Rauch, Jr., A.B. 1952, Princeton University 

William Mitchell Reid, Jr., A.B. 1952, New York University 

Donald Jeffery Reis, Cornell University 

James Richard Sartorious, B.S. 1952, Kansas State College 

Stuart Norman Scherr, A.B. 1952, Oberlin College 

Paul Schlein, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 

David Schottenfeld, A.B. 1952, Hamilton College 

George Charles Schussler, B.S. 1952, City College of New York 

Eugene Joseph Segre, Cornell University 

Anne Margaret Shuttleworth, Cornell University 

John Edward Sinning, Jr., A.B. 1952, Cornell University 

Frederic Warren Smith, B.S. 1947, Kansas State College 

Robert Hayes Stackpole, A.B. 1952, Amherst College 

Peter Maxwell Tillotson, B.S. 1952, University of Utah 

Richard David Wagoner, A.B. 1952, Carleton College 

Abraham Francis Ward, B.S. 1952, Manhattan College 

Richard Walter Weiskopf, A.B. 1952, Harvard University 

Robert Emmet Whalen, A.B. 1952, College of the Holy Cross 

Donald Richter Wieche, Miami University 

John Wynia Winkert, B.S. 1951, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn; 

M.S. 1952, University of Rochester Rochester, N.Y. 

John Phillips Young, Cornell University Rockville Centre, N.Y. 



Orange, N.J. 

Tarentum, Pa. 

Elmira, N.Y. 

South Orange, N.J. 

Waterbury, Conn. 

New York, N.Y. 

Summit, N.J. 

New Rochelle, N.Y. 

Forest Hills, N.Y. 

Ridgewood, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Woodside, N.Y. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Marshalltown, Iowa 

DeLand, Florida 

Montclair, N.J. 

Sacramento, Calif. 

Northfield, Minn. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

New Rochelle, N.Y. 

White Plains, N.Y. 

Hamilton, Ohio 



SUMMARY 

Fourth year 84 

Third year 84 

Second year 84 

First year 85 

Total 337 



Kegister of the JS/ledical College 
and Sloan-lLettering Staffs 

Abel, Jean H Medicine 56 

Adair, Frank E Surgery 81 

Adams, Harold B Pediatrics 67 

Advocate, Seymour Medicine 56 

Akelaitis, Andrew J Medicine (Neurology) 53 

Allen, Arthur C Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 100 

Allen, Edward B Psychiatry 73 

Almy, Thomas P Medicine 53 

Alpert, Harry Psychiatry 73 

Alvarez, Daniel A Pub. Health & Prev. Med 76 

Anderson, Arthur F Pediatrics 67 

Anderson, David Anatomy 48 

Antoville, Abraham A Medicine 54 

Applebaum, Jacob Surgery 82 

Araujo, Jorge Medicine 56 

Arsenault, Armand Surgery 84 

Artusio, Joseph F., Jr Surgery 81 

Atkinson, Sam G Medicine 54 

Ayres, William H Surgery 82 

Baez, Silvio Medicine 53 

Baldwin, Horace S Medicine 53 

Balensweig, Irvin Surgery (Orthopedics) 81 

BaHs, Earl Sloan-Kettering 98 

Ball, Thomas L Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Banister, George B Surgery 82 

Baras, Irving Surgery 82 

Barbu, Valer Psychiatry 73 

Barish, Julian I Psychiatry 73 

Barnes, William A Surgery 81 

Barnett, Henry L Pediatrics 67 

Barr, David Surgery 84 

Barr, David P Medicine 53 

Barrett, Martha J. Physiology 71 

Baumgartner, Leona Pub. Health & Prev. Med.; Pediatrics 76, 67 

Beasley, Jean T Pediatrics 67 

Beer, G. T Sloan-Kettering 98 

Becker, David V Sloan-Kettering 99 

Behrman, Stanley J Surgery 82 

Belcher, Anne M Surgery 82 

Bendich, Aaron Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 98 

Beneventi, Francis A Surgery 82 

Berenberg, Samuel R Pub. Health & Prev. Med.; Pediatrics 67, 76 

Berkeley, Ruth P Medicine 54 

Berle, Beatrice Medicine; Pub. Health & Prev. Med 54, 76 

111 



112 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Berlin, Louis Medicine 54 

Berntsen, Carl A., Jr. Medicine 56 

Berry, Charles M. Anatomy 48 

Beyer, Harold Sloan-Kettering (Biophysics) 99 

Biesele, John J. Sloan-Kettering (Biology) 98 

Bilisoly, Frank N., HI Medicine 56 

Billo, Otto E Pediatrics 67 

Binger, Carl A. Psychiatry 73 

Binkley, George E. Surgery 81 

Birnbaum, Stanley J. Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Bodansky, Oscar Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 98 

Bogatko, Frances H Pub. Health & Prev. Med 76 

Bonnett, Sara A. Psychiatry 73 

Bonsnes, Roy W. Biochemistry; Obs.-Gyn 51, 62 

Bowdcn, Lemuel Surgery 82 

Bowe, John J. Surgery 82 

Boyce, Kenneth C. Medicine 56 

Boynton, Perry S., Jr Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Bradlow, H. Leon Sloan-Kettering 98 

Braveman, Warren S Medicine 56 

Breed, Charles N., Jr Surgery 82 

Breen, David S Surgery 84 

Brewer, McHenry S Surgery 84 

Brice, Mitchell Surgery 84 

Brill, I. William Psychiatry 74 

Brittingham, Thomas E Medicine 56 

Brodman, Keeve Medicine 53 

Brooking, Donald G. W Medicine; Military Medicine 56, 87 

Bross, Irwin D. J Pub. Health & Prev. Med 76 

Brown, George B Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 98 

Brown, Veronica C. Medicine 54 

Browne-Mayers, Albert N. . Psychiatry 73 

Brunschwig, Alexander Surgery 81 

Brush, A. Louise Psychiatry 73 

Buchan, Douglas J Medicine 56 

Buchman, Myron I Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Buckstein, Jacob Medicine 53 

Bulmer, Malcolm W Surgery 82 

Burchenal, Joseph H Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 99 

Burke, Grafton E Medicine 54 

Burke, William H Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Burkhardt, Edward A. Medicine 54 

Burnett, Harry W Radiology 79 

Butler, Katharine Medicine 53 

Byers, Robert J Surgery 84 

Caceres, Eduardo Radiology 79 

Cahan, William G Surgery 82 

Caires, Martha K Pathology 65 

Capidaglis, Andre S Radiology 79 

Cardon, Philippe V., Jr Medicine 56 

Carey, Thomas I Surgery 82 

Carlen, Alexander Psychiatry 74 

Carlson, Arthur S Pathology 65 

Carlson, Eric T Psychiatry 74 

Carpenter, Walter T., Jr Pediatrics 67 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 113 

Carr, Henry A Medicine 53 

Carter, Anne C Medicine 53 

Cary, William H Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Cathey, William J Biochemistry 51 

Catlin, Daniel Surgery 82 

Cattell, McKeen Pharmacology 69 

Cavalieri, Liebe F Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 98 

Cecil, Russell L Medicine (Emeritus) 9 

Chaves, Aaron D Pub. Health & Prev. Med.; Medicine 53, 76 

Child, Charles G., HI Surgery 81 

Choucroun, Nine Pub. Health & Prev, Med 76 

Chu, Florence Chien-Hwa . . Radiology 79 

Cipollaro, Anthony C Medicine (Dermatology) 53 

Clarke, Donald A Sloan-Kettering 98 

Coats, Edward C Surgery 82 

Cobb, Clement B. P Pediatrics 67 

Cobb, John R. Surgery (Orthopedics) 81 

Cohen, Eugene J Medicine 56 

Cole, John T. Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Coley, Bradley L Surgery 81 

Collins, Harvey S Sloan-Kettering 99 

Console, Arthur D Surgery (Neurosurgery) 81 

Constantine, Elizabeth F. ... Surgery 82 

Conte, Alexander Surgery 82 

Conway, Herbert Surgery 81 

Cooper, Howard N Psychiatry 73 

Cooper, William Surgery (Orthopedics) 81 

Cooper, William A Surgery 81 

Cormia, Frank E Medicine (Dermatology) 53 

Cornell, Carlton M Surgery 82 

Cornell, George N Surgery 84 

Cornell, Nelson W Surgery 81 

Cotton, John M Psychiatry 73 

Craig, Robert L Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Graver, Lloyd F Medicine 53 

Crissey, Eleanor Psychiatry 73 

Daniel, William W Surgery 82 

Daniels, Helen E Psychiatry 73 

Dann, Margaret Pediatrics 67 

Dargeon, Harold W. K Pediatrics 67 

Davidson, Murray Pediatrics 67 

Davis, Bernard D Pub. Health and Prev. Med 76 

Davis, Daniel W Surgery 84 

Davis, Jeff Medicine 54 

Davis, Marion Medicine 54 

Davis, William Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Day, Emerson Pub. Health & Prev. Med 76 

Deans, Robert D Surgery 82 

Deddish, Michael R Surgery 81 

de Gara, Paul F Pathology; Pediatrics 65, 67 

DeHaven, Hugh R Pub. Health & Prev. Med 76 

Deitrick, John E Medicine 53 

Denker, Peter G Medicine (Neurology) 53 

Dennen, Edward H Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Denues, A. R. T Sloan-Kettering 98 



114 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Despcrt, J. Louise Psychiatry 73 

DeWinter, Christian Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Diamond, Henry D Medicine 54 

Diamond, Monroe T Medicine 54 

Dichl, Carolyn H Medicine 56 

Diethelm, Oskar Psychiatry 73 

Dillon, Thomas F Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Dingwall, James A., Ill Surgery 81 

Doig, Ronald K Medicine 56 

Dorman, Philip J Physiology 71 

Dougherty, John W Medicine 54 

Douglas, R. Gordon Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Draper, John W Surgery (Urology) 81 

Dreishpoon, Irving H Obstetrics & Gynecology 63 

Drew, J. Edwin Surgery 83 

Dreyfus, Pierre M Medicine 56 

DuBois, Eugene F Physiology (Emeritus) 9 

DuBois, Robert O Pediatrics 67 

Dudley, Guilford S Surgery 81 

Duley, Wade Surgery 83 

Dunbar, Howard S Surgery 83 

Dunlap, Edward A Surgery (Ophthalmology) 81 

Dunn, WiUiam H Psychiatry 73 

Dunning, Henry S Medicine (Neurology) 53 

du Vigneaud, Vincent Biochemistry 51 

Dworetzky, Murray Medicine 54 

Dyer, Charles F Surgery 84 

Eckardt, Robert E Medicine 54 

Eckel, John H Surgery 81 

Eder, Howard A Medicine 54 

Edwards, Dayton J Physiology (Emeritus) ; Sec'y of Faculty 7, 9 

Edwards, Herbert R Pub. Health & Prev. Med 76 

Egan, George F Surgery 81 

Eggleston, Gary Medicine 53 

Eichenwald, Heinz F Pediatrics 67 

Eisenbud, Mark Medicine 56 

Eliasberg, Helene Pediatrics 67 

Ellis, John T Pathology; Surgery 65, 82 

Ellison, Rose-Ruth Sloan-Kettering 99 

Elmendorf, DuMont F., Jr. ... Medicine 54 

Engle, Mary A Pediatrics 67 

Engle, Ralph L., Jr Medicine 54 

Epstein, Nathan Pediatrics 67 

Erdman, Albert J., Jr Medicine 54 

Erlandson, Marion E Pediatrics 68 

Escher, George C Sloan-Kettering 99 

Espinosa, Armando M Surgery 83 

Etz, Samuel I Obstetrics & Gynecology 63 

Evans, John A Radiology 79 

Evarts, Edward V Psychiatry 74 

Ewing, James H Pub. Health & Prev. Med 76 

Falk, Emil A Medicine 54 

Farber, Milton Psychiatry 73 

Farmer, Lawrence Medicine 54 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 115 

Farr, Hollon W Surgery 83 

Farrcll, Frank W Surgery 83 

Farrow, Joseph H Surgery 82 

Fedcr, Aaron Medicine 54 

Ferguson, Frank C, Jr Pharmacology 69 

Ferraro, Thomas J Surgery 84 

Fiedler, George A Surgery (Urology) 82 

Fincher, Esther M Medicine 56 

Fink, Austin I Surgery 83 

Finn, William F Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Fitzgerald, Patrick Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 100 

Fjelde, Audrey Sloan-Kettering 98 

Fleetwood, M. Freile Psychiatry 73 

Fleischmann, Edgar P Surgery 83 

Focht, Elizabeth F Radiology (Physics) 79 

Foley, William T Medicine 54 

Foot, N. Chandler Surgical Pathology (Emeritus) 9 

Foote, Frank W., Jr Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 100 

Foote, Frankhn M Pub. Health & Prev. Med 76 

Forkner, Claude E Medicine 53 

Fraad, Lewis M Pediatrics 67 

Franklin, John E Pediatrics 67 

Eraser, Alan W Psychiatry 73 

Frazell, Edgar L Surgery 82 

Free, Edward A Surgery 84 

Freund, Jules Pathology 65 

Freyberg, Richard H Medicine 53 

Friend, Charlotte Sloan-Kettering 98 

Friess, Constance Medicine 54 

Fukushima, David K Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 98 

Furlong, Paul J Medicine 56 

Gabel, Milton Surgery 83 

Gallagher, Thomas F Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 98 

Garb, Solomon Pharmacology 69 

Garrick, Thomas J Surgery 83 

Gause, Ralph W Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Genghof, Dorothy S Biochemistry 51 

Genvert, Harold Surgery 82 

Geohegan, William A Anatomy 48 

Gepfert, Randolph Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Gersh, Marvin J Pediatrics 67 

Gerson, Martin J Psychiatry 73 

Gerster, John C, A Surgery 82 

Gibbons, John Martin Medicine 54 

Gilder, Helena Biochemistry; Surgery 51, 82 

Gilroy, Francis J Medicine 56 

Giorgi, Elsie A Medicine 54 

Given, William P Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Glassman, Oscar Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Glenn, Frank Surgery 81 

Glynn, Martin J Pediatrics 67 

Goff, Byron H Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Gold, Harry Pharmacology 69 

Goldberg, Henry P Pediatrics 67 

Goldstein, Oscar Medicine 54 



116 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Goodell, Helen Medicine 56 

Goodridge, Malcolm Medicine (Emeritus) 9 

Goodwin, Laurance D Biochemistry 51 

Goodyear, Stephen Psychiatry 73 

Gordon, Dan M Surgery (Ophthalmology) 82 

Gordon, Samuel Biochemistry 51 

Grace, William J Medicine 54 

Gray, James G Surgery 84 

Greaves, Donald C Psychiatry 73 

Greeley, Arthur V Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Green, James L Surgery 83 

Greenacre, Phyllis Psychiatry 73 

Greenberg, Sidney M Medicine 54 

Greene, Theodore C Anatomy 48 

Greiner, Theodore H Pharmacology 69 

Gribetz, Joel Medicine 56 

Guenard, Eugene J Surgery 83 

Guion, Connie M Medicine (Emeritus) 9 

Gusscn, John Psychiatry 74 

Guthrie, Keith O., Jr Medicine 54 

Guthrie, Robert Sloan-Kettering 98 

Hadley, Susan J Medicine 54 

Hagamen, Wilbur D Anatomy 48 

Halsey, Hugh Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Hamilton, Francis J Psychiatry 73 

Hamilton, Leonard D Sloan-Kettering 99 

Hanlon, Lawrence W Assistant Dean ; Anatomy 7, 48 

Hansson, Kristian G Surgery (Physiotherapy) 81 

Haralambie, James Q Pediatrics 67 

Hardy, James D Physiology 71 

Harland, Margaret Sloan-Kettering 98 

Harrar, James A Obstetrics & Gynecology (Emeritus) 9 

Harrington, Helen Pediatrics 67 

Harris, Richard L Psychiatry 73 

Harrison, Charles S Surgery 84 

Harrison, James S Surgery 83 

Harrold, Charles C, Jr Surgery 83 

Hatterer, Lawrence J Psychiatry 74 

Hauser, Edwin T Medicine 53 

Hauser, Louis A Medicine 54 

Hausman, Louis Medicine (Neurology) 53 

Hausman, Robert Pathology 65 

Havel, Richard J Medicine 55 

Hawkins, W. Hall Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Hays, Daniel M Surgery 84 

Hays, David S Medicine 55 

Hehre, Edward J Bacteriology & Immunology 50 

HeimofF, Leonard L Medicine 55 

Heinzen, Bruce R Surgery 83 

Hellman, Leon D Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 99 

Helper, Helen N Pediatrics 67 

Helpern, Herman G Medicine 55 

Helpern, Milton Medicine; Pathology 54, 65 

Henley, Thomas F Psychiatry 73 

Henry, George W Psychiatry 73 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 117 

Herrmann, Otto Medicine 56 

Hersh, Alexander Surgery 84 

Hetzel, Basil S Medicine 56 

Hiatt, Howard H Medicine 56 

Higinbotham, Norman L Surgery- 82 

Hinkle, Lav/rence E., Jr Medicine 54 

Hinsey, Joseph C Dean: Anatomy 7, 48 

Hobson, Lawrence B Medicine 55 

Holden, Jack Surgery 84 

Hollander, Vincent P Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 99 

Holman, Cranston W Surgery 81 

Holman, James M Surgery 83 

Holswade, George R Surgery 83 

Holt, Evelyn Medicine 54 

Honig, Edward I Medicine 56 

Hood, Claude I Pathology 65 

Hood, Henry L Surgery 84 

Hooker, Russell H Surgery 83 

Hopper, Mary Ellen Medicine 56 

Horger, Eugene L Medicine 55 

Houde, Raymond W Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 99 

Howe, Suzanne A. L Surgery 83 

Huebner, Robert D Medicine 55 

Humphreys, Gustavus A Surgery (Urology) 82 

Hunt, Frederick C Pediatrics 67 

Hutchison, Dorris J Sloan-Kettering 98 

Hynes, Frank J Surgery 83 

Jacobsen, Leif Y Medicine 55 

Jacques, John A Sloan-Kettering 98 

Jameison, Gerald R Psychiatry 73 

Jaspin, George Radiology 79 

Javert, Carl T Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Jeffreys, William H Medicine 57 

Jensen, D. Rees Surgery 82 

Johnson, Donald G Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Johnson, Robert A Surgery 83 

Johnson, Scott Medicine 55 

Joslin, Doyle Surgery 82 

Joyner, Edmund N., Ill Pediatrics 67 

Kahn, Morton C Pub. Health & Prev. Med 76 

Kammerer, WilHam H Medicine 55 

Kane, Francis D Psychiatry 73 

Kantor, Herbert G Radiology 79 

Kany, Alfred W Radiology 79 

Kao, Chien-Yuan Pathology 65 

Kaplan, Lawrence I Medicine 55 

Kappas, Attallah Sloan-Kettering 98 

Karl, Richard C Surgery 83 

Karnofsky, David A Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 99 

Katzenellenbogen, Estella Sloan-Kettering 98 

Kauer, George L., Jr Medicine 54 

Kauer, Joseph T Surgery 83 

Kean, Benjamin H Medicine 54 

Keefer, Edward B. C Surgery 83 



118 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Kecgan, James M Radiology 79 

Kelley, Samuel F Surgery (Otolaryngology) 82 

Kellner, Aaron Pathology 65 

Kelly, James T Surgery 83 

Kemp, Walter W Psychiatry 74 

Kensler, Charles J Pharmacology 69 

Kent, Ann P Obstetrics & Gynecology; 

Pub. Health & Prev. Med 62, 76 

Kerns, Thomas C, Jr Surgery 84 

Kidd, Edward G Medicine 56 

Kidd, John G Pathology 65 

Kirkham, Frederic T., Jr Medicine 56 

Kirkland, Henry B Medicine 55 

Kirkpatrick, Price A Psychiatry 73 

Klebanoff, Seymour G Psychiatry 73 

Klumpp, Margaret Medicine 54 

Knehr, Charles A Psychiatry 73 

Knight, J, Vernon Medicine 55 

Koch, Henry J., Jr Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 99 

Koenig, Hedwig Pediatrics 67 

Kohl, Richard N Psychiatry 73 

Koprowska, Irena Anatomy 48 

Korngold, Leonhard Sloan-Kettering 98 

Korsch, Barbara M Pediatrics 67 

Koteen, Herbert Medicine 55 

Koteen, Phyllis H Pediatrics 67 

Kramer, Elmer E Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Kramer, Milton L Medicine 54 

Kritchevsky, Theodore H Sloan-Kettering 98 

Kuchinskas, Edward J Biochemistry 51 

Kugler, Margaret M Pediatrics 68 

Kwit, Nathaniel T Pharmacology 69 

Labbe, Joseph P Surgery 84 

La Due, John S Medicine 54 

Lake, Michael Medicine 55 

LaMar, Norvelle C Psychiatry 73 

Lampe, Ernest W Anatomy; Surgery 48, 82 

Landesman, Robert Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Langner, Helen P Psychiatry 73 

Lapham, Roger F Medicine 55 

LaRochelle, Guy Y Psychiatry 74 

LaSorte, Antonio F Surgery 84 

Lauson, Henry D Pediatrics; Physiology 67, 71 

Lawler, R. Claire Biochemistry 51 

Lawrence, Jerome Surgery 84 

Lawton, Richard W Physiology 71 

Leder, Harold L Medicine 55 

Lee, Richard E Medicine 55 

Leeds, Norma Sloan-Kettering 98 

Leighton, Alexander Hamilton Psychiatry 73 

LeMaistre, Charles A Medicine 55 

Lemcke, Dorothea Medicine 55 

Leone, Louis A Sloan-Kettering 99 

L'Esperance, Elise S Pub. Health & Prev. Med. (Emeritus) 9 

Levine, Leon I Medicine 54 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 119 

Levine, Milton I Pediatrics 67 

Levine, Samuel Z Pediatrics 67 

Lewis, George M Medicine (Dermatology) 53 

Lewis, John S Surgery 83 

Ley, Allyn B Medicine 55 

Lichtman, S. S Medicine 54 

Licberman, Jerrold S Medicine 55 

Liebolt, Frederick L Surgery (Orthopedics) 81 

Lincoln, Asa L Medicine 53 

Lintz, Robert M Medicine 55 

Lipkin, Martin Physiology 71 

Livingstone, Ernest T Medicine 57 

Loebel, Robert O Medicine 55 

Loseke, Lucile Surgery 83 

Loveless, Mary E. H Medicine (Allergy) 53 

Luckey, E. Hugh Medicine 54 

Lukas, Daniel S Medicine 55 

MacFee, William F Surgery 81 

MacLeod, John Anatomy; Physiology 48, 71 

McAuliffe, Gervais W Surgery (Otolaryngology) 81 

McCandlish, Howard S Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

McClenahan, John L Radiology 79 

McClure, Roy D Surgery 83 

McCombs, A. Parks Medicine 55 

McCormack, Richard R Medicine 55 

McCune, Robert M Medicine 56 

McDermott, Walsh Medicine 53 

McDevitt, Ellen Medicine 57 

McGowan, Frank J Surgery 82 

McGrath, John F Psychiatry 74 

Mcllveen, Marion Pediatrics 67 

McKenna, Robert J Surgery 84 

McLane, Charles M Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

McLarn, William D Obstetrics & Gynecology 63 

McLean, John M Surgery (Ophthalmology) 81 

McLellan, Allister M Surgery (Urology) 81 

McLellan, Frederick C Surgery (Urology) 82 

McNamara, Helen Pediatrics 68 

McNeer, Gordon Surgery 82 

Magida, Melville G Physiology 71 

Maisel, Bernard Surgery 83 

Marbury, Benjamin E Surgery 83 

Marchand, John F Medicine 55 

Marshall, Florence N Pediatrics 67 

Marshall, Victor F Surgery (Urology) 81 

Martin, Hayes E Surgery 81 

Martin, Herbert L Medicine 55 

Martin, Kirby Medicine 55 

Mazur, Abraham Medicine 54 

Mazzia, Valentino D Surgery 84 

Meacham, Charles T Surgery 83 

Mehler, Leopold Surgery 83 

Melchionna, Robert H Medicine 55 

Mellors, Robert C Sloan-Kettering (Biology) 98 

Melville, Donald B Biochemistry 51 



120 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Mendelsohn, Mortimer L Sloan-Kettering 99 

Mendelson, Curtis L Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Mercer, Mary E Pediatrics; Psychiatry 67, 73 

Milhorat, Ade T Medicine; Psychiatry 53, 73 

Miller, Charles J Surgery 83 

Miller, Raymond E Medicine 55 

Miller, Theodore R Surgery 83 

Milman, Anne Psychiatry 73 

Mindlin, Rowland L Pediatrics 67 

Miscall, Laurence Surgery 82 

Modell, Walter Pharmacology 69 

Moench, L. Mary Medicine 55 

Moffitt, Francis X Obstetrics & Gynecology 63 

Molander, David W Medicine 57 

Money, William L Sloan-Kettering (Biology) 98 

Moore, Ahce E Sloan-Kettering (Biology) 98 

Moore, James A Surgery (Otolaryngology) 81 

Moore, Oliver S Surgery 83 

Moore, S. W Surgery 81 

Morrill, Charles V Anatomy 48 

Mulrow, Patrick J Medicine 57 

Munroe, William G. C Medicine 57 

Murphy, M. Lois Sloan-Kettering 99 

Murphy, Willis A Medicine 55 

Muschenheim, Carl Medicine 53 

Nathanson, Joseph N Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Needy, Carl K Medicine 57 

Negrin, Juan Surgery 83 

Neill, James M Bacteriology & Immunology 50 

Nelson, Dewey A Medicine 57 

Nestler, Warren B Medicine 55 

Neuman, Robert E Sloan-Kettering 98 

New, Elizabeth V Pediatrics 68 

Nickel, William F,, Jr Surgery 81 

Nickerson, Kenneth G Obstetrics & Gynecology 63 

Nickson, James J Sloan-Kettering (Radiology) 100 

Nielsen, Jens Sloan-Kettering (Radiology) 100 

Noback, Richardson K Medicine 55 

Norton, Edward W. D Surgery 84 

Oberholzer, Emil Psychiatry 73 

Ogilvie, John B Surgery 83 

Olcott, Charles T Pathology 65 

Oljenick, Ignaz W Medicine (Neurology) 57 

Ollstein, Phihp Pub. Health & Prev. Med 76 

O'Neill, Earl A Surgery 83 

Opie, Eugene L Pathology (Emeritus) 9 

Oppel, Theodore W Medicine 53 

O'Regan, Charles H Pediatrics 67 

Ormond, Louise H Medicine 56 

Ostwald, Peter F Psychiatry 74 

O'Sullivan, Ward D Surgery 82 

Otken, Charles C Biochemistry 51 

Overman, Ralph S Medicine 54 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 121 

Pack, George T Surgery 81 

Palmer, Arthur Surgery (Otolaryngology) 81 

Papanicolaou, George Anatomy (Emeritus) 9 

Paquin, Albert J Surgery 83 

Pardee, Harold E. B Medicine 53 

Parsons, Herbert Surgery 82 

Patterson, Marjorie B Medicine 55 

Patterson, Robert L Surgery (Orthopedics) 82 

Patterson, Russel H Surgery 81 

Payne, Mary Ann Medicine 54 

Pearce, John M Pathology; Surgery 65, 81 

Pearson, Olof H Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 99 

Pearson, T. Arthur Radiology 79 

Peck, Robert E Psychiatry 74 

Pennington, Thomas G Medicine 57 

Perrone, Francis S Medicine 57 

Person, E. Cooper, Jr Surgery 81 

Petermann, Mary L Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 98 

PhiHps, Frederick S Sloan-Kettering 98 

Phillips, Ralph F Radiology 79 

Pierce, Virginia K Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Pitts, Robert F Physiology 71 

Plummer, Norman Medicine 54 

Pool, John L Surgery 82 

Poppell, James W Sloan-Kettering 99 

Pressman, David Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 98 

Pride, Henry H Pediatrics 68 

Pritchett, R. A. Rees Medicine 55 

Prout, Curtis T Psychiatry 73 

Rachele, Julian R Biochemistry 51 

Rackow, Leon L Psychiatry 73 

Randall, Henry T Sloan-Kettering (Surgery) 101 

Rapak, Michael Surgery 83 

Rawson, Rulon W Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 99 

Ray, Bronson S Surgery 81 

Reader, George G Medicine; Pharmacology 54, 69 

Redo, S. Frank Surgery 84 

Rees, Thomas D Surgery 84 

Reilly, H. Christine Sloan-Kettering 98 

Reilly, Joseph F Pharmacology 69 

Rennie, Thomas A. G Psychiatry 73 

Ressler, Charles H Medicine 55 

Ressler, Charlotte Biochemistry 51 

ReznikofF, Paul Medicine 53 

Rhoads, CorneHus P Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 100' 

Richardson, Eric G Surgery 83 

Richardson, Henry B Medicine 53 

Richardson, Howard L Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 100' 

Richter, Goetz W Pathology 65 

Rigney, Thomas G Pub. Health & Prev. Med 76 

Riker, Walter F., Jr Pharmacology 69 

Riley, Edgar A Medicine 55 

Rinzler, Seymour H Pharmacology , 69 

Rizzo, Peter C Surgery (Orthopedics) 82 

Robbins, Guy F Surgery 83 



li 



122 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Robbins, Jacob Medicine 55 

Robbins, William C Medicine 55 

Roberts, Carlton W Biochemistry 51 

Roberts, Kathleen R Sloan-Kettering 98 

Robertson, Theodore Pathology 65 

Rockwell, Fred V Psychiatry 73 

Rogatz, Peter Medicine 56 

Rogoff, Julius L Medicine 55 

Roll, Paul M. Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 98 

Roseman, David M Medicine 57 

Rosenfeld, Robert Sloan-Kettering 98 

Rosensohn, Meyer Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Rothbard, Sidney Medicine 53 

Rubin, Albert L Medicine 55 

Sabbatino, Joseph F Medicine 55 

Sackett, Nelson B Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Salamon, Ivan I Sloan-Kettering 98 

Samuels, Bernard R Surgery (Ophthalmology) (Emeritus) 9 

Scanlan, Theresa Medicine 55 

Schaefer, George Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Schaffer, Shirley Psychiatry 74 

Scharnagel, Isabel M Surgery 83 

Schillinger, Arnold A Psychiatry 74 

Schlamowitz, Max Sloan-Kettering 98 

Schloss, Oscar M Pediatrics (Emeritus) 9 

Schmidlapp, Carl J., Ill Surgery 83 

Schmidt, John G Surgery (Orthopedics) 82 

Schneider, Rudolf Sloan-Kettering 98 

Schottstaedt, William W Medicine 56 

Schulman, Irving Pediatrics 67 

Schwartz, Hans J Medicine (Dermatology) (Emeritus) 9 

Schwartz, Irving Radiology 79 

Selby, Henry M Radiology 79 

Seybolt, John F Anatomy 48 

Sheard, Charles Medicine 55 

Shepard, Edward M Medicine 55 

Sheppard, Erwin Medicine 54 

Sherfey, Mary J. Psychiatry 74 

Sherman, Robert S Radiology 79 

Sherwin, Albert G Psychiatry 74 

Shorr, Ephraim Medicine 53 

Shultz, Selma M Medicine 56 

Siegel, Malcolm Sloan-Kettering 98 

Simon, Eugene P Medicine 56 

Simons, Donald J Medicine; Psychiatry 53, 74 

Sinclaire, Harry A Medicine 56 

Slater, Beatrice S Pediatrics 67 

Sleisinger, Marvin H Medicine 56 

Smedley, Lois M Pediatrics 67 

Smillie, Wilson G Pub. Health & Prev. Med 76 

Smith, Berton P Medicine 57 

Smith, Carl H Pediatrics 67 

Smith, Erwin F Obstetrics & Gynecology 63 

Smith, Frank R Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Smith, J. James Medicine 54 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 123 

Smith, Martha L Pediatrics 67 

Snodgrass, John J Radiology 79 

Snyder, Charles T Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Snyder, Ruth E Radiology 79 

Snyder, Stuart S Surgery (Ophthalmology) 82 

Soloway, Albert H Sloan-Kettering 98 

Sonenberg, Martin Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 99 

Sonkin, Lawrence S Medicine 57 

Southam, Chester M Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 99 

Speer, David S Surgery 83 

Spellman, Robert M Surgery 84 

Spielman, Aaron D Medicine 55 

Spier, L Robert Surgery 84 

Spitz, Sophie Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 100 

Stanton, Carey Pathology 65 

Stanton, Edward F Obstetrics & Gynecology 62 

Stark, Richard B Surgery (Plastic Surgery) 82 

Stearns, Maus W., Jr Surgery 83 

Steinberg, A. Harell Medicine 56 

Steinberg, Herman Medicine 56 

Steinberg, Israel Medicine ; Radiology 54, 79 

Stephens, Richmond Surgery (Orthopedics) 81 

Sternberg, Stephen S Sloan-Kettering 100 

Stevens, Alexander R Surgery (Urology) (Emeritus) 9 

Stevenson, Carl R Medicine 56 

Stevenson, Lewis D Pathology; Medicine (Neurology) 54, 65 

Stewart, Fred W Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 100 

Stewart, Harold J Medicine 53 

Stillerman, Maxwell Pediatrics 67 

Stimson, Philip M Pediatrics 67 

Stock, C. Chester Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 98 

Stoll, Alice M Physiology 71 

Stopps, Gordon J Pathology 65 

Straub, Lee R. Surgery 83 

Straub, Leonard R Psychiatry 74 

Struve, John F. Surgery 83 

Stubenbord, William D. Medicine 55 

Stubington, David Pathology 65 

Sugg, John Y Bacteriology & Immunology 50 

Suh, Succjo Medicine 57 

SuUivan, Joseph D Psychiatry 74 

Sullivan, W. James Physiology 71 

Sunderland, Douglas Sloan-Kettering 100 

Sutherland, Arthur M Medicine 54 

Sutter, James T Medicine 55 

Sutton, John E Surgery 82 

Sved, Dorothy W Sloan-Kettering 99 

Swan, Roy C Physiology 71 

Sweeney, Lawrence Medicine 57 

Sweeney, William J Obstetrics & Gynecology 63 

Sweet, Joshua E. Experimental Surgery (Emeritus) 9 

Swift, Katharine W Medicine 55 

Sykes, Marguerite Sloan-Kettering 99 

Syz, Hans Psychiatry 74 



124 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Taft, Lawrence T Pediatrics 68 

Tagnon, Henry J Medicine 53 

Taussky, Hertha H Medicine 56 

Taylor, Alexander Medicine 56 

Taylor, Sterling Biochemistry 51 

Temple, Harold L Radiology 79 

Thompson, David D Physiology 71 

Thompson, Hartwell G., Jr. ... Medicine 57 

Thompson, T. Campbell Surgery (Orthopedics) 81 

Thorbjarnarson, Bjorn Surgery 84 

Timpanelli, Alphonse E Medicine 54 

Tollefsen, H. Randall Surgery 83 

Tolstoi, Edward Medicine 53 

Tompsett, Ralph Medicine 53 

Toolan, Helene W Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 100 

Topkins, Marjorie J Surgery 84 

Torda, Clara Medicine 54 

Torre, Douglas P Medicine 55 

Toscani, Vincent A Medicine 56 

Travell, Janet Pharmacology 69 

Travis, John H Psychiatry 73 

Treves, Norman L Surgery 82 

Troutman, Richard C Surgery 83 

Tulin, Maurice Medicine 56 

Tulloch, John A Medicine 56 

Tweddel, George Surgery 83 

Twinem, Francis P Surgery (Urology) 82 

Twiss, J. Russell Medicine 56 

Tyhurst, James S Psychiatry 73 

Tyndall, Marian Medicine 56 

Urban, Jerome A Surgery 83 

Valentine, E. Henry Obstetrics & Gynecology 63 

Valergakis, Frederick E. G. ... Medicine 56 

Vogel, F, Stephen Pathology; Surgery 65, 82 

vom Eigen, Paul R Medicine 57 

VomSaal, Frederick Surgery 83 

Voorhees, William D Psychiatry 73 

Wade, Preston A Surgery 81 

Wadsworth, Morton Psychiatry 74 

Wagner, Lewis C Surgery (Orthopedics) 81 

Wall, James H Psychiatry 73 

Wallis, Lila A Medicine 57 

Wantz, George E., Jr Surgery 84 

Warner, Nathaniel Psychiatry 74 

Watson, Robert F Medicine 53 

Watson, William L Surgery 82 

Way, Howard Surgery 84 

Weber, Frederick C, Jr Medicine 56 

Webster, Bruce P Medicine 53 

Weeden, Willis M Surgery; Pub. Health & Prev. Med 76, 83 

Weeks, Donald L Surgery 84 

Weinbaum, Jerome A Obstetrics & Gynecology 63 

Weinfeld, Herbert Sloan-Kettering 98 

Weintraub, Sydney Radiology 79 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 125 

Weinstock, Irwin M Psychiatry 74 

Weisenfeld, Shirley Sloan-Kettering 99 

Welch, Livingston Psychiatry 73 

Wellemeyer, Jane E Pediatrics 68 

Welsch, Exie Ehzabeth Psychiatry 73 

Werner, Charles A Medicine 56 

Werner, Erwin A Medicine 56 

W^ertz, Frederick J Psychiatry 74 

West, Charles D Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 99 

West, John P Surgery 82 

Westley, Kent F Radiology 79 

Wetchler, Martin S Radiology 79 

Wetzig, Paul C Surgery 83 

Weymuller, Louis E Pediatrics 67 

Wheatley, Marjorie A Pediatrics 67 

Wheeler, Charles H Medicine 54 

White, Stephen Radiology 79 

Whitmore, Willet F., Jr Surgery (Urology) 82 

Whitney, Doris S Pediatrics 67 

Wielawski, Joseph S Psychiatry 74 

Wierum, Carl Medicine 57 

Wilber, Mary M Medicine 57 

Wilder, Joseph R Surgery 84 

Willard, Harold N Medicine; Pub. Health & Prev. Med 56, 76 

Williams, Byard Medicine 54 

Wilson, May G Pediatrics 67 

Wilson, Philip D Surgery (Orthopedics) 81 

Wilson, Philip D., Jr Surgery 84 

Wingebach, Wilfred D Surgery 84 

Wolbach, Robert A Physiology 71 

Wolff, Harold G Medicine (Neurology) ; Psychiatry 53, 73 

Wolff, WiUiam I Surgery 84 

Woodard, Helen Q Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 98 

Woodward, Walter D Psychiatry; Pub. Health & Prev. Med 74, 76 

Woolley, George W Sloan-Kettering (Biology) 98 

Wright, Harold S Psychiatry 74 

Wright, Irving S Medicine 53 

Wright, Mary Ehzabeth Biochemistry 51 

Wroblewski, Felix Medicine 56 

Yeager, Robert L Medicine (Tuberculosis) 57 

Zborowski, Mark Medicine 56 

Zins, Eugene I Medicine 57 

Zipser, Stanley S Pediatrics 67 

Zucker, Seymour Medicine 56 

SUMMARY OF MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 

Full Professors 37 

Associate Professors 86 

Assistant Professors 157 

Instructors, Assistants, etc 421 

Total 701 



126 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

SUMMARY OF SLOAN-KETTERING DIVISION STAFF 

Full Professors 12 

Associate Professors 11 

Assistant Professors 13 

Instructors, Assistants, etc 44 

Total 80 



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CORNELL UNIVERS 
OFiK 1 L, PUBLICATION 

AUGUST 12, 1953 

Nledical College 

ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOR 1953-54 SESSIONS 




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Contents ^^^^i^^a^ 



Calendar 5 

The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center 7 

The College Council 7 

The College Advisory Committee 8 

Standing Committees 10 

Faculty 11 

General Statement 28 

Requirements for Admission and Graduation ...... 33 

General Information: 

Fees, Residence. Prizes, Scholarships, Loans 40 

Cornell University Medical College Alumni Association ... 48 

Educational Policies and Plan of Instruction 49 

Description of Courses 

Anatomy 51 

Bacteriology and Immunology 53 

Biochemistry 54 

Medicine 56 

Medical Comprehensive Care 63 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 65 

Pathology 68 

Pediatrics 70 

Pharmacology 73 

Physiology and Biophysics 74 

Psychiatry 76 

Public Health and Preventive Medicine 79 

Radiology 83 

Surgery 85 

Special Students 91 

Table of Required Hours 92 

Sloan-Kettering Division and Faculty 97 

Internship ^Appointments, Class of 1953 104 

Register of Students, 1953-54 106 

Register of Medical College and Sloan-Kettering Staffs . . 113 



1953 


1954 




July 










January 










July 




S M 


T W T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T 


F S 




1 2 


3 


4 








1 


2 






1 


2 3 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 10 


12 13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 17 


19 20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 24 


26 27 


28 29 30 


31 




24 25 
31 


26 27 28 


29 


30 


25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 31 




August 










February 










August 




S M 


T W T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T 


F S 








1 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 


1 


2 


3 4 5 


6 7 


2 3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


8 


9 


10 11 12 


13 14 


9 10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


20 21 


16 17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 28 


23 24 25 26 27 


28 


29 


28 










29 


30 31 




30 31 


September 










March 










September 




S M 


T VV T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T VV T 


F s 




1 2 3 


4 


5 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 






1 2 


3 4 


6 7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 11 


13 14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 18 


20 21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


21 


22 23 24 25 


26 


27 


19 


20 21 22 23 


24 25 


27 28 


29 30 
October 






28 


29 


30 31 
April 






26 


27 


28 29 30 
October 




S M 


T W T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


X VV T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T 


F S 




1 


2 


3 






1 


2 


3 








1 2 


4 5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 9 


11 12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 16 


18 19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 


25 26 


27 28 29 
November 


30 


31 


25 


26 


27 28 29 
May 


30 




24 
31 


25 


26 27 28 
November 


29 30 


S M 


T W T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T W T 


F s 


1 2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 










1 




1 


2 3 4 


5 6 


8 9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 13 


15 16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 20 


22 23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 27 


29 30 








23 


24 25 26 27 


28 


29 


28 


29 


30 












30 


31 


















December 










June 










December 




S M 


T W T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T VV T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T VV T 


F S 




1 2 3 


4 


5 






1 2 3 


4 


5 






1 2 


3 4 


6 7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 11 


13 14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 18 


20 21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 25 


27 28 


29 30 31 






27 


28 29 30 






26 


27 


28 29 30 


31 



Calendar 



1953 
June 22 

July 4 
August 13 
Sept. 7 
Sept. 8-9 

Sept. 9 
Sept. 10 

Oct. 5 
Oct. 12 
Nov. 24-25 
Nov. 25 
Nov. 26-29 
Nov. 30 

Dec. 19 

1954 
Jan. 4 
Feb. 4 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 22 
March 1-2 
March 2 
March 3-10 
March 11 
April 8 
May 28 
May 31- 
June 3 
June 9 



Registration and beginning^ of instruction for fourth year 

students, first division. 
Independence Day — holiday 
Second di\ision begins for fourth year students. 
Labor Day — holiday. 
Examinations for conditioned students. 
Registration for first, second, and third year classes, 
Opening exercises, 3:30 p.m. 
Instruction begins for first, second, and third year classes, 

9 a.m. 
Third division begins for fourth year students. 
Columbus Day — holiday. 
Examinations for second year students. 
Fall term ends, 5 p.m. 
Thanksgiving recess. 
Winter term begins, 9 a.m. 
Fourth division begins for fourth year students. 
Christmas recess begins, 1 p.m. 

Christmas recess ends, 9 a.m. 

Fifth division begins for fourth year students. 

Lincoln's Birthday — holiday. 

Washington's Birthday — holiday. 

Examinations for first year students. 

Winter term ends, 5 p.m. 

Spring recess. 

Spring term begins, 9 a.m. 

Sixth division begins for fourth year students. 

Instruction ends for all classes, 5 p.m. 

Final examinations. 
Commencement, 2:30 p.m. 



The New York Hospital— Cornell 
M.edical Center 



THE CENTER was formed by an agreement between the Society of 
the New York Hospital and Cornell University in order to associate 
organically the hospital and the medical college and to effect a complete 
coordination of the medical, educational, and scientific activities of the 
two institutions. 

The Center is operated under the supervision of a Joint Administra- 
tive Board, composed of three governors of the Society of the New York 
Hospital, three representatives of the Board of Trustees of Cornell Uni- 
versity, and one other member elected by the appointed members. The 
Director of the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center is the chief 
executive officer of the Joint Administrative Board, composed of the 
following: 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Director, 
the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center 
Deane W. Malott Hamilton Hadley 

Neal D. Becker Henry S. Sturgis 

Arthur H. Dean John Hay Whitney, Chairman 

John W. Davis 

FORM FOR BEQUESTS 

The Society of the New York Hospital is associated with the Cornell 
University Medical College, Avhich is one of the colleges of Cornell Uni- 
versity, under the title of "The New York Hospital - Cornell Medical 
Center." 

Gifts or bequests should be made either to the Hospital or to the Uni- 
versity, but not to the above-named Association. 

If for the Hospital, the language may be: "I give and bequeath to the 
Society of the New York Hospital, the sum of S " 

If for the College, the language may be: "I give and bequeath to Cor- 
nell University the sum of $ for use in connection 

with its Medical College in New York City." If it is desired that a gift 
shall be used in whole or in part for any specific purpose in connection 
with the College, such use may be specified. 

THE COLLEGE COUNCIL 

For the purpose of discharging its duties to the Memorial Hospital 
under the Douglas Deeds of Trust, the Board of Trustees is constituted 



8 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

as the Council of the Cornell University Medical College in New York 
City. 

THE COLLEGE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
There is also established a Medical College Advisory Committee, 
which shall consist of eleven members: The President of the University, 
who shall be Chairman; the Director of the New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center; four trustees to be elected by the Board of Trustees, one 
of whom shall be elected each year for the term of four years; the Dean 
of the Medical College; two members of the Faculty of the Medical Col- 
lege, to be elected by such Faculty, one each year for the term of two 
years; two alumni of the Medical College, one to be appointed by the 
Medical College Alumni Association and the other by the Board of 
Trustees, each for a term of one year. 

The Committee at present consists of the following members: 

Deane W. Malott, President of the University, Chairman, ex officio 

, Dean of the Medical College, ex officio 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Director, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center, ex officio 

Dorothy McS. Arnold \ 
Stanton Griffis ( of the Board 

Jacob G. Schurman, Jr. ( of Trustees 
William B. Cornell ^ 



Samuel Z. Levine 
Robert F. Pitts 



of the Faculty 









Irving S. Wright ) r .t m • I 

V of the Alumni 
Nelson W. Cornell j 

Edward K. Taylor, Secretary 






Officers of Administration 



Deane W. Malott, President of the University 

, Dean of the Medical College 

Lawrence W. Hanlon, Assistant Dean 

Dayton J. Edwards, ^e£T£:tary ^f-fh r^ucuUy ^-^-^^^^^^^-^--^ ^ 

Edward K. Taylor, Assistant Treasurer and Business Manager 

Beatrice Berle, Counselor to Foreign Students 

Anna F. Burke, Librarian 

EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Deane W. Malott 

David P. Barr LA^VRENCE W. Hanlon 

McKeen Cattell Joseph C. Hinsey 

OsKAR Diethelm John G. Kidd 

R. Gordon Douglas Samuel Z. Levine 

Vincent du Vigneaud James M. Neill 

Frank Glenn Robert F. Pitts 

Wilson G. Smillie 



Standing Committees 



COMMITTEE ON CURRICULUM 

Vincent du Vigneaud, Chairman 
David P. Barr John G. Kidd 

Oskar Diethelm Samuel Z. Levine 

R. Gordon Douglas S. W. Moore 

John Y. Sugg 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Lawrence W. Hanlon, Chairman 

William H. Dunn Wilson G. Smillie 

Dayton J. Edwards Richard B. Stark 

Donald B. Melville Alphonse E. Timpanelli 

Preston A. Wade 



LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

Thomas P. Almy, Chairman 
Henry L. Barnett Richard W. Lawton 

Harry W. Burnett John MacLeod 

McKeen Cattell Julian R. Rachele 

Frank Glenn Anna F. Burke 



COMMITTEE ON PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

, Chairman 

Heads of departments, or their representatives, responsible for 
the more important courses of each year. 



COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS 

James M. Neill, Chairman 
John M. McLean S. W. Moore 

Paul Reznikoff 

COMMITTEE ON PRIZES IN RESEARCH 

Robert F. Pitts, Chairman 
Thomas P. Almy John MacLeod 

John M. Pearce 



*The Dean is ex officio a member of all committees. 

10 



Faculty 



DEANE W. MALOTT, President of the University. (A.B. 1921, University of 
Kansas; M.B.A. 1923, Harvard Business School; LL.D. 1941, Washburn Uni- 
versity; LL.D. 1951, Bryant College; LL.D. 1951, Hamilton College.) 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

RUSSELL L. CECIL, M.D. [1910; 1950] Professor of Clinical Medicine 

EUGENE F. Dubois, M.D. [1910; 1950] Professor of Physiology 

DAYTON J. EDWARDS, Ph.D. [1918; 1950] Professor of Physiology 

CARY EGGLESTON, M.D. [1911; 1953] Professor of Clinical Medicine 

N. CHANDLER FOOT, M.D. [1932; 1948] Professor of Surgical Pathology 

MALCOLM GOODRIDGE, M.D. [1910; 1946] Professor of Clinical Medicine 

CONNIE M. GUION, M.D. [1924; 1951] Professor of Clinical Medicine 

JAMES A. HARRAR, M.D. [1932; 1948] Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

and Gynecology 
ELISE STRANG L'ESPERANCE, M.D. [1910; 1950] Professor of Clinical 

Public Health and Preventive Medicine 
CHARLES V. MORRILL, Ph.D. [1915; 1953] Professor of Anatomy 

EUGENE L. OPIE, M.D. [1932; 1941] Professor of Pathology 

GEORGE PAPANICOLAOU, M.D. [1914; 1951] Professor of Clinical 

Ajiatomy 
BERNARD R. SAMUELS, M.D. [1914; 1942] Professor of Clinical Surgery 

(Ophthalmology) 
HANS J. SCHWARTZ, M.D. [1911; 1942] Professor of Clinical Medicine 

(Dermatology) 
ALEXANDER R. STEVENS, M.D. [1924; 1946] Professor of Clinical Surgery 

(Urology) 
JOSHUA E. SWEET, M.D. [1926; 1941] Professor of Experimental Surgery 

PROFESSORS 

DAVID P. BARR, Professor of Medicine. Physician-in-Chief, New York Hospital; 

Consulting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1911, M.D. 1914, Cornell; LL.D. 

1929, Central College; Sc.D. 1946, Washington University. [1916; 1941]) 
ALEXANDER BRUNSCHWIG, Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 

Memorial Hospital. (B.A. 1923, M.S. 1924, University of Chicago; M.D. 1926, 

Rush. [1947]) 
McKEEN CATTELL, Professor of Pharmacology. (B.S. 1914, Columbia; A.M. 

1917, Ph.D. 1920, M.D. 1924, Harvard. [1924; 1943]) 
LLOYD F. GRAVER, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, Memo- 
rial Hospital. (A.B. 1915, M.D. 1918, Cornell. [1934; 1952]) 
OSKAR DIETHELM, Professor of Psychiatry. Psychiatrist-in-Chief, New York 

Hospital. (Statsexamen 1922, U. of Zurich; M.D. 1923, U. of Berne. [1936]) 



•The figures in brackets following the name of each faculty member indicate the date of original 
appointment and the year of induction into present rank. 

11 



12 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

R. GORDON DOUGLAS, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Obstetrician- 
and-Gynecologist-in-Chief, New York Hospital. (M.D.C.M. 1924^, McGill. [1932; 
1949]) 

GUILFORD S. DUDLEY, Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, New 
York Hospital; Consultant in Surgery, Second Surgical Division, Bellevue Hos- 
pital. (A.B. 1910, M.D. 1913, Cornell. [1917; 1949]) 

VINCENT DU VIGNEAUD, Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1923, M.S. 1924, 
Illinois; Ph.D. 1927, Rochester. [1938]) 

yOHN A. EVANS, Professor of Clinical Radiology. Radiologist-in-Chief, New York 
Hospital. (B.S. 1931, New York University; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1937; 1953]) 

CLAUDE E. FORKNER, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, New 
York Hospital. (A.B. 1922, M.A. 1923, University of California; M.D. 1926, Harvard. 
[1938; 1953]) 

FRANK GLENN, Lewis Atterbury Stimson Professor of Surgery. Surgeon-in-Chief, 
New York Hospital. (M.D. 1927, Washington University. [1932; 1947]) 

HARRY GOLD, Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (A.B. 1919, M.D. 1922, Cor- 
nell. [1922; 1947]) 

PHYLLIS GREENACRE, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Attending Psychiatrist, 
New York Hospital. (B.S. 1913, U. of Chicago; M.D. 1916, Rush. [1932; 1933]) 

LOUIS HAUSMAN, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). Associate Attend- 
ing Physician (Neurology), New York Hospital; Visiting Neurologist in Charge, 
Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1912, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1916, 
Cornell. [1923; 1945]) 

JOHN G. KIDD, Professor of Pathology. Pathologist-in-Chief, New York Hospital. 
A.B. 1928, Duke; M.D. 1932, Johns Hopkins. [1944]) 

SAMUEL Z. LEVINE, Professor of Pediatrics. Pediatrician-in-Chief, New York 
Hospital. (A.B. 1916, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1920, Cornell. 
[1924; 1936]) 

GEORGE M. LEWIS, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatology). Attending 
Physician (Dermatology), New York Hospital, (M.D. 1925, University of Alberta; 
L.M.C.C. 1925, Medical College of Canada. [1932; 1949]) 

ASA L. LINCOLN, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1910, M.A. 1911, 
Elon College; M.D. 1916, Johns Hopkins. [1921; 1941]) 

WILLIAM F. MacFEE, Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, New 
York Hospital, (A.B. 1914, University of Tennessee; M.D. 1918, Johns Hopkins. 
[1936; 1952]) 

JOHN M. McLean, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). Attending Sur- 
geon in Charge of Ophthalmology, New York Hospital. (M.E. 1930, Stevens In- 
stitute; M.D. 1934, Cornell. [1941; 1943]) 

JAMES M. NEILL, Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. (B.S. 1917, Alle- 
gheny; Ph.D. 1921, Massachusetts Agricultural College; D.Sc. 1940, Allegheny. 
[1931]) 

MARVIN K. OPLER, Visiting Professor of Anthropology (Social Psychiatry). 
(A.B. 1935, University of Michigan; Ph.D. 1938, Columbia University. [1953]) 

ARTHUR PALMER, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology). Attending 
Surgeon (Otolaryngology), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1911, Brown; M.D. 1915, 
Cornell. [1923; 1948]) 

JOHN M, PEARCE, Professor of Pathology; Professor of Pathology in Surgery. At- 
tending Pathologist, New York Hospital. (Ph.B. T930, Yale; M.D. 1934, Harvard. 
[1948]) 

ROBERT F. PITTS, Professor of Physiology. (B.S. 1929, Butler University; Ph.D. 
1932, Johns Hopkins; M.D. 1938, New York University. [1942; 1950]) 



FACULTY 13 

BRONSON S. RAY, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). Attending Sur- 
geon in Charge of Neurosurgery, New York Hospital; Consulting Neurosurgeon, 
New York Hospital, Westchester Division; Clinical Assistant Visiting Neuro- 
Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1924, Franklin; M.D. 1928, Northwestern. 
[1932; 1948]) 

THOMAS A. C. RENNIE, Professor of Psychiatry (Social Psychiatry). Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1924, University of Pittsburgh; M.D. 
1928, Harvard. [1942; 1950]) 

PAUL REZNIKOFF, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, New 
York Hospital; Consulting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S, 1916, New York 
University; M.D. 1920, Cornell. [1924; 1946]) 

WILSON G. SMILLIE, Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. Con- 
sultant in Preventive Medicine and Public Health, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1908, Colorado College; M.D. 1912, D.P.H. 1916, Harvard. [1937]) 

LEO SROLE, Visiting Professor of Sociology (Social Psychiatry). (B.S. 1933, Harvard; 
Ph.D. 1940, University of Chicago. [1952]) 

LEWIS D. STEVENSON, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology); Associate 
Professor of Pathology. Attending Pathologist, Associate Attending Physician (Neu- 
rology), New York Hospital; Consulting Neurologist, New York Hospital, West- 
chester Division; Associate Visiting Neuro-Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 
1916, M.D. 1916, Queen's University. [1922; 1945]) 

PHILIP M. STIMSON, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1910, Yale; M.D. 1914, Cornell. [1919; 
1953]) 

HAROLD L. TEMPLE, Professor of Clinical Radiology. Attending Radiologist, 
New York Hospital. (B.S. 1932, M.D. 1935, University of Nebraska. [1941; 1946]) 

PRESTON A. WADE, Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending Surgeon, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1922, M.D. 1925, Cornell. [1927; 1953]) 

SYDNEY WEINTRAUB, Professor of Clinical Radiology. Attending Radiologist, 
New York Hospital. (M.D. 1918, Columbia. [1932; 1950]) 

MAY G. WILSON, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending Pediatri- 
cian, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1911, Cornell. [1918; 1952]) 

PHILIP D. WILSON, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). Attending Sur- 
geon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Surgeon-in-Chief, Hospital for Special 
Surgery. (A.B. 1909, M.D. 1912, Harvard. [1951]) 

HAROLD G. W'OLFF, Professor of Medicine (Neurology); Associate Professor of 
Psychiatry. Attending Physician, Associate Attending Psychiatrist, New York Hos- 
pital; Consulting Neurologist, New York Hospital, Westchester Division; Clinical 
Assistant Visiting Neuro-Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1918, College of 
the City of New York; M.D. 1923, M.A. 1928, Harvard. [1931; 1948]) 

IRVING S. WRIGHT, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, New 
York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1946; 1949]) 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

FRANK E. ADAIR, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1910, Sc.D. 1934, Marietta College; M.D. 1915, Johns 
Hopkins. [1934; 1938]) 

THOMAS P. ALMY, James Ewing Associate Professor of Neoplastic Diseases 
(Medicine). Associate Attending Physician, New York Hospital; Assistant Attending 
Physician, Memorial Hospital; Associate Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. 
(A.B. 1935, M.D. 1939, Cornell. [1940; 1948]) 



14 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

ARTHUR F. ANDERSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York HospitaL (M.D. 1916, Tufts. [1930; 1948]) 

JOSEPH F. ARTUSIO, JR. Associate Professor of Surgery (Anesthesiology); As- 
sociate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Anesthesiology). Anesthesiologist-in- 
Charge, New York HospitaL (B.S. 1939, St. Peter's; M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1946; 
1953]) 

HORACE S, BALDWIN, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1917, Wesleyan University; M.D. 
1921, Cornell. [1923; 1947]) 

WILLIAM A. BARNES, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1933, College of the City of New York; 
M.D. 1937, Cornell. [1938; 1946]) 

HENRY L. BARNETT, Associate Professor of Pediatrics. Associate Attending Pedi- 
atrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1938, M.D. 1938, Washington University. 
[1946; 1950]) 

JOHN M. BEAL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending Surgeon, 
New York Hospital. (B.S. 1937, M.D. 1941, Chicago University. [1942; 1953]) 

CHARLES M. BERRY, Associate Professor of Anatomy. (A.B. 1938, De Pauw; 
M.S. 1939, Ph.D. 1941, Northwestern. [1947; 1951]) 

CARL A. BINGER, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1910, M.D. 1914, Harvard. [1932; 1948]) 

GEORGE E. BINKLEY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (M.B. 1914, Toronto. [1950; 1952]) 

ROY W. BONSNES, Associate Professor of Biochemistry; Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry in Obstetrics and Gynecology. (B.S. 1930, University of Connecticut; 
Ph.D. 1939, Yale. [1941; 1950]) 

HARRY W. BURNETT, Associate Professor of Radiology. Associate Attending 
Radiologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1940, Miami University; M.D. 1943, North- 
western University. [1948; 1953]) 

ANTHONY C. CIPOLLARO, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatol- 
ogy). Assistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1924, Dartmouth; 
M.D. 1927, Columbia. [1948; 1951]) 

BRADLEY L. COLEY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1915, Yale; M.D. 1919, Columbia. [1941; 1950]) 

HERBERT CONWAY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Plastic Surgery). 
Attending Surgeon in Charge of Plastic Surgery, New York Hospital; Visiting 
Surgeon, Bellevue HospitaL (M.B. 1928, B.S. 1929, M.D. 1929, M.S. 1932, University 
of Cincinnati. [1932; 1946]) 

WILLIAM A. COOPER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, Stanford University; M.D. 1932, 
Cornell. [1934; 1946]) 

NELSON W. CORNELL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1918, M.D. 1921, Cornell. [1925; 1942]) 

HAROLD W. K. DARGEON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Attending 
Pediatrician, Memorial Hospital. (M.D. 1922, Albany. [1947; 1951]) 

EMERSON DAY, Associate Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. Director, Strang Cancer Prevention Clinic, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 
1934, Dartmouth; M.D. 1938, Harvard. [1947; 1950]) 

EDWARD H. DENNEN, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1919, Tufts. 
[1933; 1949]) 

J. LOUISE DESPERT, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attend- 
ing Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, Barnard; M.D. 1932, New York 
University. [1939; 1951]) 



FACULTY 15 

JOHN W. DRAPER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). Associate 
Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Visiting Surgeon in Charge 
of Urological Service, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1927, Dartmouth; M.D. 1931, 
Cornell. [1932; 1949]) 

WILLIAM H. DUNN, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attend- 
ing Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. {A.B. 1923, Rochester; M.D. 1927, Harvard. 
[1932; 1947]) 

HENRY S. DUNNING, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). As- 
sociate Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1927, M.D. 1930, Cor- 
nell. [1932; 1948]) 

JOHN H. ECKEL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending Sur- 
geon, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 
1929, New York University; M.D. 1933, Cornell. [1934; 1946]) 

GEORGE F. EGAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Dental Surgery). At- 
tending Dental Surgeon in Charge, New York Hospital. (D.M.D. 1931, Harvard. 
[1933; 1953]) 

RICHARD H. FREYBERG, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.D. 1930, M.S. 1934, Uni- 
versity of Michigan. [1945]) 

WILLIAM J. GRACE, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1938, St. Peter's College; M.D. 1942, Cornell. 
[1944; 1953]) 

KRISTIAN G. HANSSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Physical Med- 
cine). Director of Physical Medicine, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1920, M.D. 1923, 
Cornell. [1925; 1948]) 

EDWIN T. HAUSER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1916, College of the City of New York; M.D. 
1922, Cornell. [1925; 1949]) 

EDWARD J. HEHRE, Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. (A.B. 
1934, M.D. 1937, Cornell. [1938; 1949]) 

GEORGE W. HENRY, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Attending Psychi- 
atrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1912, Wesleyan; M.D. 1916, Johns Hopkins. 
[1928; 1932]) 

CRANSTON W. HOLMAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate At- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Director, Second Surgical Division, Bellevue 
Hospital. [1932; 1953]) 

CARL T. JAVERT, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. At- 
tending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1932, Buffalo. 
[1937; 1949]) 

MORTON C. KAHN, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Med- 
icine. (B.S. 1916, Ph.D. 1924, Cornell; A.M. 1917, Columbia; ScD. 1938, Havana. 
[1919; 1934]) 

AARON KELLNER, Associate Professor of Pathology. Associate Attending Path- 
ologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1934, Yeshiva University; M.S. 1935, Columbia; 
M.D. 1939, University of Chicago. [1946; 1953]) 

CHARLES J. KENSLER, Associate Professor of Pharmacology. (A.B. 1937, M.A. 
1938, Columbia; Ph.D. 1948, Cornell. [1946; 1953]) 

MILTON L. KRAMER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.D. 1929, Columbia. [1935; 1953]) 

ERNEST W. LAMPE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery; Assistant Professor of 
Clinical Anatomy. Assistant Attending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Visiting 
Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1920, University of Minnesota; M.D. 1923, Rush 
Medical School. [1941; 1953]) 



If) CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

HENRY D. LAUSON, Associate Professor of Physiology; Associate Professor of 
Physiology in Pediatrics. Assistant Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. 
(B.S. 1936, Ph.D. 1939, M.D. 1940, University of Wisconsin. [1950; 1951]) 

FREDERICK L. LIEBOLT, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
Attending Surgeon in Charge of Orthopedics, New York Hospital; Attending 
Orthopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (A.B. 1925, LL.D. 1948, Univer- 
sity of Arkansas; M.D. 1930, Washington University; Sc.D. 1937, Columbia. [1939; 
1946.]) 

MARY H. LOVELESS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Allergy). As- 
sistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1921, M.D. 1925, Stanford. 
[1939; 1948]) 

E. HUGH LUCKEY, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. Director, Second Medical Division, Bellevue 
Hospital. (B.S. 1940, Union; M.D. 1944, Vanderbilt. [1948; 1953]) 

JOHN MacLeod, Associate Professor of Anatomy; Assistant Professor of Physi- 
ology. (A.B. 1934, M.Sc. 1937, New York University; Ph.D. 1941, Cornell. [1941; 
1949]) 

GERVAIS W. McAULIFFE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngol- 
ogy). Attending Surgeon (Otolaryngology), New York Hospital. (M.D. 1920, 
Long Lsland College Hospital. [1926; 1942]) 

HOWARD S. McCANDLISH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1917, 
University of Virginia. [1921; 1949]) 

WALSH McDERMOTT, Associate Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1930, Princeton; M.D. 1934, Columbia. [1935; 1946]) 

CHARLES M. McLANE, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital; Assistant Attend- 
ing Radiologist (Obstetrics and Gynecology), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1924, 
M.D. 1928, Johns Hopkins. [1932; 1949]) 

ALLISTER M. McLELLAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 
Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Attending Urologist, New 
York Hospital, Westchester Division. (M.D. 1924, McGill. [1932; 1948]) 

VICTOR F. MARSHALL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). At- 
tending Surgeon in Charge of Urology, New York Hospital; Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (M.D. 1937, University of Virginia. [1938; 1946]) 

HAYES E. MARTIN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial HospitaL (A.B. 1911, M.D. 1917, Iowa. [1941; 1950]) 

DONALD B. MELVILLE, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1936, M.S. 
1937, Ph.D. 1939, University of Illinois. [1944; 1948]) 

ADE T. MILHORAT, Associate Professor of Medicine in Psychiatry; Associate Pro- 
fessor of Psychiatry. Attending Physician, New York Hospital, (A.B. 1924, Columbia; 
M.D. 1928, Cornell. [1933; 1951]) 

JAMES A. MOORE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology). At- 
tending Surgeon in Charge of Otolaryngology, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1930, 
Davidson College; M.D. 1934, Harvard. [1941; 1948]) 

S. W. MOORE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, New 
York Hospital; Assistant Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1926, Davidson; 
M.D. 1930, Harvard. [1932; 1946]) 

CARL MUSCHENHEIM, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital, (A.B. 1928, M.D. 1931, Columbia. [1933; 1946]) 

JOSEPH N. NATHANSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecol- 
ogy. Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. CM. 
1919, McGill. [1926; 1951]) 



FACULTY 17 

WILLIAM F. NICKEL, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant At- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hos- 
pital. (A.B. 1930, M.D. 1934, Johns Hopkins. [1935; 1950]) 

THEODORE W. OPPEL, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.A. 1927, Wisconsin; M.D. 1929, Penn- 
sylvania. [1923; 1951]) 

(iEORGE T. PACK, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1920, Ohio State; M.D. 1922, Yale. [1935; 1950]) 

HAROLD E. B. PARDEE, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1906, M.D. 1909, Columbia. [1917; 
1926]) 

RUSSEL H. PATTERSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate At- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 
1914, Georgia; M.D. 1918, Harvard. [1921; 1946]) 

RALPH F. PHILLIPS, Associate Professor of Radiology. Associate Attending Radia- 
tion Therapist, Memorial Hospital. (B.S.M.B. 1928, M.S. 1930, University of 
London; D.M.R.E. 1933, Royal College of England. [1950; 1951]) 

JULIAN R. RACHELE, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. (B.A. 1934, M.S. 
1935, Ph.D. 1939, New York University. [1940; 1948]) 

GEORGE C. READER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1940, M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1946; 1953]) 

HENRY B. RICHARDSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1910, 
M.D. 1914, Harvard. [1924; 1932]) 

WALTER F. RIKER, Associate Professor of Pharmacology. (B.S. 1939, Columbia; 
M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1941; 1950]) 

SIDNEY ROTHBARD, Associate Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Colgate; M.D. 1935, Rochester. [1951]) 

ROBERT S. SHERMAN, Associate Professor of Radiology. Attending Roentgenol- 
ogist, Memorial Hospital. (Ph.B. 1931, Brown; M.D. 1935, Harvard. [1947; 1951]) 

EPHRAIM SHORR, Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology). Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, M.D. 1922, Yale. [1926; 1942]) 

DONALD J. SIMONS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Neuro-Psychiatrist, Belle- 
vue Hospital. (A.B. 1927, Brown; M.D. 1931, Harvard. [1939; 1948]) 

CARL H. SMITH, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.A. 1915, College of the City of New York; 
M.A. 1917, Columbia; M.D. 1922, Cornell. [1928; 1947]) 

FRANK R. SMITH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology.. 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital; Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1917, Yale; M.D. 1921, Harvard. [1932; 
1950]) 

RICHMOND STEPHENS, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attending Orthopedic 
Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (B.S. 1911, M.D. 1913, Columbia. [1951]) 

HAROLD J. STEWART, Associate Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1915, M.D. 1919, A.M. 1923, Johns Hopkins. [1932]) 

JOHN Y. SUGG, Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. (B.S. 1926, 
Ph.D. 1931, Vanderbilt. [1932; 1943]) 

HENRY J. TAGNON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attend- 
ing Physician, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1931, Liege; M.D. 1936, Brussels. [1947; 
1948]) 



18 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

T. CAMPBELL THOMPSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ortho- 
pedics). Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attending Or- 
thopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (A.B. 1924, Rollins; M.D. 1928, 
Johns Hopkins; ^LSc.D. 1936, Columbia. [1951]) 

ALPHONSE E. TIMPANELLL Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant 
Attending Physician, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Physician, Bellevue 
Hospital. (A.B. 1932, Columbia; NLD. 1936, Cornell. [1938; 1953]) 

EDWARD TOLSTOL Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, Yale; M.D. 1923, Cornell. [1927; 1947]) 

RALPH R. TOMPSETT, Associate Professor of Medicine. Associate Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1934, M.D. 1939, Cornell. [1947; 1952]) 

JANET TRAVELL, Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (A.B. 1922, 
Wellesley; M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1930; 1947]) 

NORNL\N L. TREVES, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1915, A.M. 1916, Wabash College; M.D. 1920, 
Johns Hopkins. [1948; 1953]) 

LEWIS C. WAGNER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). At- 
tending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attending Orthopedic Sur- 
geon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (A.B. 1916, Georgetown; M.D. 1920, Johns 
Hopkins. [1951]) 

JAMES H. WALL, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Medical Director, 
New York Hospital, Westchester Division. (M.D. 1927, Jefferson Medical College. 
[1933; 1946]) 

ROBERT F. WATSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1934, University of Virginia. 1946; 1950]) 

BRUCE P. W^EBSTER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (M.D.C.M. 1925, McGill. [1932; 1947]) 

LIVINGSTON WELCH, Associate Professor of Psychology. (A.B. 1931, M.A. 
1932, Ph.D. 1935, Columbia. [1947; 1952]) 

CHARLES H. WHEELER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital; Assistant Attending Physician, Memorial 
Hospital. (B.S. 1931, Princeton; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1936; 1953]) 

WILLET F. WHITMORE, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1938, Rutgers; M.D. 1942,' Cornell. [1943; 
1953]) 

BYARD WILLIAMS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital; Attending Physician, New York Hospital, West- 
chester Division; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1926, Williams; 
M.D. 1930, Columbia. [1933; 1953]) 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

HAROLD B. ADAMS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1917, Columbia; M.D. 1920, Cornell. 
[1934; 1944]) 

ANDREW J. AKELAITIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 
Assistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital; Clinical Assistant Visiting 
Neuro-Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1925, M.D. 1929, Johns Hopkins. 
[1947]) 

SILVIO BAEZ, Assistant Professor of Medicine. (B.S. 1936, M.D. 1943, National 
Asuncion Medical School, Paraguay. [1948; 1952]) 

IRVIN BALENSWEIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). At- 
tending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1915, College of the 
City of New York; M.D. 1918, Cornell. [1920; 1934]) 



FACULTY 19 

THOMAS L. BALL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1936, M.D. 1939, Cornell. [1948; 1953]) 

LEONA BAUMGARTNER, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine; Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. (A.B. 1923, M.A. 1925, Kan- 
sas; Ph.D. 1932, M.D. 1934, Yale. [1935; 1940]) 

STANLEY J. BEHRMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Dental Surgery). 
Associate Attending Dental Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1942, New York 
University; D.D.S. 1945, University of Pittsburgh. [1948; 1953]) 

SAMUEL R. BERENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Pre- 
ventive Medicine; Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. (A.B. 1931, Amherst; 
M.D. 1935, University of Vermont. [1947; 1951]) 

BEATRICE B. BERLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. (A.B. 1923, Vassar; M.A. 1924, Columbia; M.D. 1938, New York Uni- 
versity. [1946; 1950]) 

LOUIS BERLIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). (A.B. 1934, 
University of Illinois; M.D. 1941, Chicago Medical School. [1952; 1953]) 

KEEVE BRODMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (B.S. 1927, College 
of the City of New York; M.D. 1931, Cornell. [1938; 1950]) 
/^L? IRWIN D. J. BROSS, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 
(Vital Statistics). (B.A. 1942, University of North Carolina; M.S. 1948, North 
Carolina State College; Ph.D. 1949, University of North Carolina. [1952]) 

JACOB BUCKSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Visiting Roentgen- 
ologist, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1911, College of the City of New York; M.D. 
1915, Cornell. [1927; 1940]) 

KATHARINE BUTLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital; Assistant Visiting Physician, Bellevue 
Hospital. (A.B. 1920, Mt. Holyoke; M.A. 1926, Columbia; M.D. 1935, Cornell. 
[1938; 1951]) 

JUSTIN T. CALLAHAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
(A.B. 1939, M.D. 1943, Columbia University. [1947; 1953]) 

HENRY A. CARR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Princeton; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1947; 
1950]) 

ANNE C. CARTER, Assistant Professor of Medicine. (A.B. 1941, Wellesley; M.D. 
1944, Cornell. [1945; 1952]) 

AARON D. CHAVES, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine; Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1931, William and Mary; M.D. 1935, New York 
University. [1946; 1951]) 

EUGENE E. CLIFFTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital; Clinical Assistant in Surgery, Memorial Hospital. 
(B.S. 1933, Lafayette College; M.D. 1937, Yale Medical School. [1938; 1953]) 

CLEMENT B. P. COBB, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1922, Williams; M.D. 1926, Har- 
vard. [1934; 1944]) 

JOHN R. COBB, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). Associate 
Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital. Attending Orthopedic 
Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (A.B. 1925, Brown University; M.D. 
1930, Yale; Med.Sc.D. 1936, Columbia. [1951]) 

EUGENE J. COHEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (B.A. 1933, M.S. 1934, Wisconsin; M.D. 1938, 
, Cornell. [1940; 1952]) 



20 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

JOHN T. COLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Associ- 
ate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1936, 
Duke; M.D. 1940, University of Maryland. [1941; 1951]) 

ARTHUR D. CONSOLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). 
Assistant .Attending Surgeon (Neurosurgery), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1937, 
Cornell; M.D. 1941, Cornell. [1944; 1951]) 

\VILLL\.M COOPER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). As- 
sociate Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics) New York Hospital; Attending Ortho- 
pedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (B.S. 1929, New York University; 
M.D. 1933, Long Island College [1951]) 

FRANK E. CORMIA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatology). 
Assistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1926, M.D. 1930, Uni- 
versity of Vermont. [1946; 1948]) 

ROBERT L. CRAIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
.Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 
1923, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1932; 1949]) 

HELEN E. DANIELS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Assistant Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1937, Barnard; M.D. 1941, Cornell. [1945; 
1953]) 

MARGARET DANN, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. Associate Attending Pedia- 
trician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, Oberlin; M.S. 1925, Illinois; Ph.D. 1932, 
Cornell; M.D. 1937, Yale. [1938; 1945]) 

NHCHAEL R. DEDDISH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate At- 
tending Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1933, M.D. 1937, Ohio State Univer- 
sity, [1942; 1951]) 

PAUL F. DE GARA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics (Allergy). Assistant 
Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1926, University of Heidel- 
berg; M.D. 1927, University of Padua. [1941; 1950]) 

PETER G. DENKER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). As- 
sociate Visiting Neuro-Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1923, College of the 
City of New York; M.D. 1927, Cornell. [1932; 1941]) 

HENRY D. DIAMOND, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attend- 
ing Physician, Memorial Hospital. (A.B, 1941, M.D. 1944, University of Louisville. 
[1947; 1952]) 

JAMES A. DINGWALL, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant At- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Assistant Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hos- 
pital. (A.B. 1936, Dartmouth; M.D. 1940, Cornell. [1941; 1946]) 

ROBERT O. Dubois, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1915, M.D. 1919, Columbia. [1923; 
1940]) 

HOWARD S. DUNBAR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Neurosurgery), New York Hospital; Assistant Visiting 
Neurosurgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1941, M.D. 1944, Cornell. [1949; 1953]) 

EDWARD A. DUNLAP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Ophthalmology), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1932, 
Westminster; M.D. 1935, Western Reserve. [1945; 1948]) 

HERBERT R. EDWARDS, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. (M.D. 1918, College of Medical Evangelists. [1942]) 

HELENE ELIASBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1919, University of Berlin. [1943; 
1948]) 

JOHN T. ELLIS, Assistant Professor of Pathology; Assistant Professor of Pathology 
in Surgery. Assistant Attending Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1942, Uni- 
versity of Texas; M.D. 1945, Northwestern. [1948; 1950]) 



FACULTY 21 

RALPH L. ENGLE, Jr., Assistant Professor of Medicine. (B.S. 1942, University of 
Florida; M.D. 1945, Johns Hopkins. [1949; 1952]) 

NATHAN EPSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clitiical Pediatrics. (B.S. 1922, M.LT.; 
Ph.D. 1928, Columbia; M.D. 1934, Munich. [194G; 1952]) 

ALBERT J. ERDMANN, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate 
Visiting Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1933, Yale; M.D. 1937, Harvard. 
[1940; 1953]) 

HOLLON W. FARR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1939, Yale; M.D. 1942, Harvard. [1953; 1953) 

JOSEPH H. FARROW, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1926, M.D. 1930, University ot Virginia. 
[1950; 1951]) 

AARON FEDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1938, University of Maryland. [1941; 1950]) 

FRANK C. FERGUSON, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. (B.S. 1940, Bucknell; 
M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1948; 1953]) 

GEORGE A. FIEDLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). Associ- 
ate Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1923, Wisconsin; 
M.D. 1925, Pennsylvania. [1950]) 

WILLIAM F. FINN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1936, Holy Cross; M.D. 1940, Cornell. [1942; 1948]) 

ELIZABETH F. FOCHT, Assistant Professor of Radiology (Physics). Associate 
Attending Physicist, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1935, Barnard. [1947; 1951]) 

WILLIAM T. FOLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1933, Columbia; M.D. 1937, Cornell. 
[1946; 1951]) 

FRANKLIN M. FOOTE, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Med- 
icine. (B.S. 1930, M.D. 1933, D.P.H. 1935, Yale. [1941]) 

LEWIS M. FRAAD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1935, University of Vienna. [1945; 1949]) 

JOHN E. FRANKLIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. Assistant Attending Pediatrician, Memorial 
Hospital. (B.S. 1928, Notre Dame; M.D. 1932, Harvard. [1947; 1948]) 

ALAN W. ERASER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Assistant Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1939, Bard; M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1944; 
1952]) 

EDGAR L. FRAZELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1929, M.D. 1931, University of Texas. [1950]) 

CONSTANCE FRIESS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, Barnard; M.D. 1932, Cornell. 
[1933; 1944]) 

SOLOMON GARB, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (A.B. 1940, M.D. 
1943, Cornell. [1949; 1953]) 

RALPH W. CAUSE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. As- 
sociate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, 
University of Texas; M.D. 1930, Harvard. [1935; 1947]) 

HAROLD GENVERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital. (D.D.S. 1932, Pennsylvania; M.D. 1936, Yale. [1937; 
1950]) 

WILLIAM A. GEOHEGAN, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. (E.E. 1929, M.D. 
1941, Cornell. [1941; 1944]) 



22 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

PvANDOLPH GEPFERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 
1929, University of Georgia. [1941; 1951]) 

JOHN C. A. GERSTER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. (A.B. 1902, M.D. 
1905, Columbia. [1913; 1919]) 

HELENA GILDER, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry; Assistant Professor of 
Surgery (Biochemistry). (A.B. 1935, Vassar; M.D. 1940, Cornell. [1947; 1953]) 

WILLIAM P. GIVEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1941, Harvard, M.D., Cornell. [1946; 1952]) 

OSCAR CLASSMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. As- 
sociate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, 
University of Utah; M.D. 1925, New York University. [1946; 1951]) 

MARTIN J. GLYNN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Fordham; M.D. 1935, Long Island 
College. [1939; 1943]) 

HENRY P. GOLDBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1932, M.D. 1936, Johns Hopkins. 
[1946; 1950]) 

DAN M. GORDON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Ophthalmology), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1929, 
M.D. 1932, Michigan. [1945; 1948]) 

ARTHUR V. GREELEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecol- 
ogy. Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. 
(B.S. 1925, Yale; M.D. 1929, Johns Hopkins. [1932; 1949]) 

SIDNEY M. GREENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Visit- 
ing Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1925, M.D. 1928, Cornell. [1934; 1950]) 

THEODORE C. GREENE, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. (A.B. 1920, M.D. 
1924, Harvard. [1951]) 

ROGER L. GREIF, Assistant Professor of Physiology. (B.S. 1937, Haverford; M.D. 
1941, Johns Hopkins. [1953]) 

SUSAN J. HADLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (A.B. 1941, Wisconsin; 
M.D. 1944, Cornell. [1946; 1952]) 

WILBUR D. HAGAMEN, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. (B.S. 1945, Baldwin- 
Wallace College; M.D. 1951, Cornell. [1949; 1953]) 

FRANCIS J. HAMILTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate 
Attending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, St. Joseph's College; 
M.D. 1933, Jefferson. [1940; 1949]) 

LAWRENCE W. HANLON, Assistant Dean, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
(A. B. 1935, M.D. 1938, Cornell. [1946; 1948]) 

JAMES Q. HARALAMBIE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant 
Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Oberlin; M.D. 1935, 
Yale. [1939; 1949]) 

HELEN HARRINGTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B., M.A. 1916, University of Den- 
ver; M.D. Johns Hopkins. [1933; 1944]) 

RICHARD L. HARRIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. (M.D. 1920, 
University of Georgia. [1951]) 

MILTON HELPERN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Visiting 
Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1922, College of the City of New York; M.D. 
1926, Cornell. [1931; 1940]) 

NORMAN L. HIGINBOTHAM, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate 
Attending Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (M.D.C.M. 1926, McGill. [1940; 1950]) 

LAWRENCE E. HINKLE, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (A.B. 1938, 
University of North Carolina; M.D. 1942. Harvard. [1947; 1951]) 



FACULTY 23 

ELLIOT HOCHSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, Columbia; M.D. 1932, New York Uni- 
versity. [1952; 1953]) 

EVELYN HOLT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, Wellesley; M.A. 1921, M.D. 1924, Cornell. 
[1926; 1952]) 

GUSTAVUS A. HUMPHREYS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Associate Visiting 
Surgeon (Urology), Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1927, Princeton; M.D. 1932, Columbia. 
[1937; 1946]) 

FREDERICK C. HUNT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1924, Western Ontario. [1932; 
1940]) 

GER.\LD R. JAMEISON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1918, Albany Medical College. [1933; 
1936]) 

GEORGE JASPIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. Associate Attending 
Radiologist in Charge of School of Radiology, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1932, 
Columbia; M.D. 1936, Michigan. [1945; 1948]) 

D. REES JENSEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1925, Columbia. [1928; 1949]) 

DONALD G. JOHNSON, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Asso- 
ciate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, N€w York Hospital. (B.A. 1936, 
Maine; M.D. 1940, Yale. [1942; 1948]) 

EDMUND N. JOYNER, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant 
Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1927, Virginia Military Insti- 
tute; M.D. 1932, Cornell. [1934; 1948]) 

WILLIAM H. KAMMERER, Assistajit Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant 
Attending Physician, New York Hospital; Assistant Visiting Physician, Bellevue 
Hospital. (B.S. 1931, M.D. 1935, University of Indiana. [1941; 1953]) 

GEORGE L. KAUER, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Visiting 
Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1933, New York University; M.D. 1937, Cornell. 
[1938; 1949]) 

JOSEPH T. KAUER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. 
(B.S. 1933, New York University, M.D. 1937, Cornell. [1938; 1953]) 

B. H. KEAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Tropical Medicine). Assistant 
Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1933, California; M.D. 1937, 
Columbia. [1952]) 

SAMUEL F. KELLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology). 
Attending Surgeon (Otolaryngology), New York Hospital. (M.D. 1921, University 
of Texas. [1926; 1943]) 

ANN P. KENT, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preveyitive Medicine. 
Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1930, George Washington University; M.D. 1933, University of Maryland; M.P.H. 
1939, Johns Hopkins. [1950; 1951])' 

SEYMOUR G. KLEBANOFF, Assistant Professor of Psychology. (A.B. 1937. M.S. 

1939, Yale; Ph.D. 1947, Northwestern. [1950]) 
MARGARET KLUMPP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant At- 
tending Phvsician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1928, Tufts; M.D. 1932, Cornell. 
[1950; 1951]) 

J. VERNON KNIGHT, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Assistant \'isiting Physician, 
Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1939, William Jewell College, M.D. 1943, Harvard. 
[1947; 1953]) 



24 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

HED\VIG KOENIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York HospitaL (A.B. 1918, Barnard; M.A. 1920, Columbia; 
M.D. 1929, Johns Hopkins. [1935; 1944]) 

RICHARD N. KOHL, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. Assistant Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1938, M.D. 1942, University of Cin- 
cinnati. [1945; 1950]) 

BARBARA M. KORSCH, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1941, Smith; M.D. 1944, Johns Hopkins. 
[1947; 1952]) 

HERBERT KOTEEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (A.B. 1935, Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, M.D. 1939, Johns Hopkins. [1943; 1953]) 

ELMER E. KRAMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 
1935, M.D. Tulane. [1946; 1952]) 

NORMAN KRETCHMER, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Pediatrics. (B.S. 
1944, Cornell; M.S. 1945, Ph.D. 1947, Minnesota; M.D. 1952, New York State 
University. [1953]) 

JOHN S. LaDUE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. Associate Attending Physician, Memorial Hos 
pital. (B.S. 1932, M.S. 1940, Ph.D. 1941, Universitv of Minnesota; M.D. 1936, 
Harvard. [1947; 1948]) 

MICHAEL LAKE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, M.D. 1922, Cornell. [1926; 1953]) 

NORVELLE C. LaMAR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate At- 
tending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1921, M.D. 1925, Indiana. [1932; 
1942]) 

RICHARD W. LAWTON, Assistant Professor of Physiology. (A.B. 1942, Dart- 
mouth, M.D. 1944, Cornell. [1948; 1951]) 

RICHARD E. LEE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (B.S. 1939, University 
of Massachusetts; M.A. 1940, Ph.D. 1942, Harvard; M.D. 1947, Columbia. [1950; 
1953]) 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON LEIGHTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psy- 
chiatry. Assistant Attending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, Prince- 
ton; M.A. 1934, Cambridge; M.D. 1936, Johns Hopkins. [1947]) 

CHARLES A. LeMAISTER, Assistant Professor of Medicine. (A.B. 1944, University 
of Alabama; M.D. 1947, Cornell. [1948; 1953]) 

LEON I. LEVINE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 
1918, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1922, Cornell. [1924; 1939]) 

MILTON I. LEVINE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1923, College of the City of New York; 
M.D. 1927, Cornell. [1933; 1944]) 

ALLYN B. LEY, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Physician, 
Memorial Hospital; Assistant Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1939, Dartmouth; 
M.D. 1942, Columbia. [1947; 1953]) 

SOL S. LIGHTMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1918, College of the City of New York; M.D. 
1921, Cornell. [1943; 1947]) 

MACK LIPKIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (B.S. 1926, College of the 
City of New York; M.D. 1930, Cornell. [1953]) 

EDWARD J. LORENZE, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Physical 
Medicine). (M.D. 1946, New York University. [1953]) 

DANIEL S. LUKAS, Assistant Professor of Medicine. (A.B. 1944, M.D. 1947, Colum- 
bia. [1948; 1953]) 






FACULTY 25 

BERNARD MAISEL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. (A.B. 1936. M.D. 
1940, Johns Hopkins. [1945; 1953]) 

BENJAMIN E. MARBURY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Anesthesiology); 
Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology (Anesthesiology). As- 
sistant Attending Anesthesiologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1939, B.S. 1942, 
Missouri University; M.S. 1941, Louisiana State University; M.D. 1944, Washington 
University, St. Louis. [1948; 1953]) 

KIRBY A. MARTIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1922, Washington University, St. Louis. 
[1927; 1953]) 

ABRAHAM MAZUR, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine. (B.S. 1932, 
College of the City of New York; M.A. 1934, Ph.D. 1938, Columbia. [1941; 1949]) 

JOHN L. McCLENAHAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. (A.B. 1937, 
Yale; M.D. 1941, University of Pennsylvania. [1949; 1953]) 

RICHARD R. McCORMACK, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (A.B. 1937) 
Columbia; M.D. 1941, Cornell. [1946; 1953]) 

FRANK J. McGOWAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, M.D. 1921, Columbia. [1932; 1950]) 

FREDERICK C. McLELLAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Attending Urol- 
ogist, New York Hospital, Westchester Division. (B.S. 1929, M.D. 1933, Dalhousie; 
M.S. 1936, Michigan. [1941; 1948]) 

GORDON P. McNEER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (M.D. 1931, University of Pennsvlvania. [1950; 
1951]) 

ROBERT H. MELCHIONNA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (B.S. 1929, 
St. John's University; M.D. 1935, St. Louis University. [1939; 1953]) 

CURTIS L. MENDELSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. 
(A.B. 1934, Michigan; M.D. 1938, Cornell. [1947]) 

MARY E. MERCER, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics; Assistant Professor of Pe- 
diatrics in Psychiatry. Associate Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. 
(B.S. 1932, Simmons; M.D. 1943, Colorado. [1945, 1948]) 

LAURENCE MISCALL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Visiting Surgeon, 
Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.D. 1930, Cornell. [1942; 1947]) 

WALTER MODELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (B.S. 1928, 
College of the City of New York; M.D. 1932, Cornell. [1932; 1949]) 

CHARLES T. OLCOTT, Assistant Professor of Pathology. Associate Attending 
Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1911, Princeton; M.D. 1916, Cornell. 
[1926; 1943]) 

PHILIP OLLSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. (M.D. 1927, Long Island College of Medicine. [1944; 1950]) 

CHARLES H. O'REGAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, St. Francis Xavier; M.D. 
1928, McGill. [1932; 1944]) 

WARD D. O'SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant .\t- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1938, Fordham; M.D. 1942, Cor- 
nell. [1943; 1951]) 

RALPH S. OVERMAN, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine. (A.B. 
1938, University of Illinois; M.S. 1941, University of Wisconsin; Ph.D. 1942, 
University of Wisconsin [1947; 1951]) 



26 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

HERBERT PARSONS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). 
Associate Attending Surgeon (Neurosurgery), New York Hospital; Associate 
Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Yale; M.D. 1935, Harvard. [1938; 
1949]) 

ROBERT L. PATTERSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthope- 
dics). Associate Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attend- 
ing Orthopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (A.B. 1928, University of 
Georgia; M.D. 1932, Harvard. [1951]) 

MARY ANN PAYNE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1935, Hood; M.A. 1941, Ph.D. 1943, 
Wisconsin; M.D. 1945, Cornell. [1946; 1952]) 

T. ARTHUR PEARSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. Assistant 
Attending Radiologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1930, Gustavus Adolphus; 
M.A. 1934, M.D. 1935, University of Minnesota. [1948; 1949]) 

NORMAN PLUMMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Physician, Bellevue 
Hospital. (A.B. 1922, University of California; M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1928; 1941]) 

J. LAWRENCE POOL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1930, Princeton; M.D. 1934, Columbia. [1948]) 

CURTIS T. PROUT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Assistant Medical 
Director and Clinical Director, New York Hospital, Westchester Division. (A.B. 
1921, M.D. 1924, Cornell; M.S. 1930, University of Michigan. [1948; I95I]) 

JOSEPH E. RALL, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Physician, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1940, North Central College; M.S. 1944, M.D. 1945. North- 
western University; Ph.D. 1952, University of Minnesota. [1951; 1953]) 

JOSEPH F. REILLY, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. (A.B. 1937, University of 
Illinois; M.A. 1939, Harvard; Ph.D. 1947, University of Chicago. [1948; 1953]) 

GOETZ W. RICHTER, Assistant Professor of Pathology. Assistant Attending 
Pathologist, New York Hospital. (B.A. 1943, Williams College; M.D. 1948, Johns 
Hopkins. [1948; 1953]) 

PETER C. RIZZO, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). Associate 
Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attending Orthopedic 
Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. [M.D. 1926, Bellevue]) 

FRED V. ROCKWELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate At- 
tending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, M.D. 1936, Rochester. 
[1939; 1946]) 

NELSON B. SACKETT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 
1917, Princeton; M.D. 1923, Columbia. [1932; 1948]) 

JOHN G. SCHMIDT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). Asso- 
ciate Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1925, Williams; 
M.D. 1930, Harvard. [1939; 1946]) 

JOHN F. SEYBOLT, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. (B.S. 1938, Yale; M.D. 1943, 
Cornell. [1947; 1951]) 

MARY J. SHERFEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. (A.B. 1940, M.D. 
1943, Indiana University. [1946; 1953]) 

J. JAMES SMITH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Visiting 
Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1934, St. Peters; M.D. 1938, Cornell. [1939; 
1946]) 

STUART S. SNYDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Ophthalmology), New York Hospital. (B.Sc. 1941, 
York College; M.D. 1944, University of Nebraska. [1947; 1951]) 



FACULTY 27 

RICHARD B. STARK, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Plastic Surgery). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Plastic Surgery), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1936, 
Stanford; M.D. 1941, Cornell. [1950; 1952]) 

ISRAEL STEINBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine; Assistant Professor 
of Clinical Radiology. Assistant Attending Radiologist (Angiocardiography), New 
York Hospital. (B.S. 1924, M.D. 1928, Harvard. [1940; 1949]) 

WILLIAM D. STUBENBORD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant 
Visiting Physician, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Physician, Bellevue 
Hospital. (B.S. 1927, Wesleyan University; M.D. 1931, Cornell. [1933; 1953]) 

ARTHUR M. SUTHERLAND, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant 
Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1932, Yale; M.D. 1936, Colum- 
bia. [1937; 1951]) 

JOHN E. SUTTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 
1915, A.M. 1917, M.D. 1920, Cornell. [1923; 1950]) 

ROY C. SWAN, Assistant Professor of Physiology. (A.B. 1941, M.D. 1947, Cornell. 
[1948; 1953]) 

JOHN H. TRAVIS, Assistant Professor of Cliyiical Psychiatry. (M.B. 1911, Univer- 
sity of Toronto. [1941; 1945]) 

FRANCIS P. TWINEM, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). Asso- 
ciate Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1917, Wooster 
College; M.A. 1919, Princeton; M.D. 1925, Harvard. [1950]) 

F. STEPHEN VOGEL, Assistant Professor of Pathology; Assistant Professor of 
Pathology in Surgery. Assistant Attending Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1941, Villanova; M.D. 1944, Western Reserve. [1948; 1950]) 

WILLIAM L. WATSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Sur- 
geon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1922, M.D. 1925, Cornell. [1940; 1950]) 

WILLIS M. WEEDEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. Assistant Attending Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1916, M.D. 
1919, Cornell. [1922; 1950]) 

ARTHUR WEIDER, Assistant Professor of Psychology (Social Psychiatry). (A.B. 
1940, Ph.D. 1946, New York University; M.A. 1941, Columbia. [1942; 1953]) 

EXIE E. WELSCH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Assistant Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1930; M.D. 1932, University of Indiana. 
[1949]) 

JOHN P. WEST, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending Sur- 
geon, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1927, Alabama Polytechnic Institute; M.D. 1932, 
Cornell. [1938; 1949]) 

LOUIS E. WEYMULLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.Sc. 1923, M.D. 1925, University of 
Nebraska. [1936; 1949]) 

MARJORIE A. WHEATLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant 
Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, Vassar; M.D. 1929, Co- 
lumbia. [1931; 1945]) 

STEPHEN WHITE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. Associate Attending 
Radiologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1920, College of the City of New York; 
M.D. 1924, Cornell. [1931; 1944]) 

HOMER C. WICK, Jr., Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 
(M.D. 1945, Johns Hopkins; M.P.H. 1949, Harvard. [1952; 1953]) 

HAROLD N. WILLARD, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Med- 
icine. (A.B. 1939, Yale; M.D. 1943, Johns Hopkins. [1951]) 



General Statement 



HISTORY 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY Medical College was established by the 
Board of Trustees of Cornell University on April 14, 1898, when 
they elected Dr. William M. Polk Director of the College and Dean of 
the Medical Faculty and appointed six professors. The Medical College 
was made possible by the munificence of Colonel Oliver H. Payne; who 
provided the funds for the erection of the original building, located at 
28th Street and First Avenue, and who pledged his support to the new 
institution. For several years he provided funds for the annual support 
of the college and later placed the institution on a secure foundation by 
making generous provision for its permanent endowment by a gift of 
over four million dollars. 

In October, 1898, instruction began in temporary quarters. As the 
Medical College admitted a number of students to advanced standing, 
Cornell University granted the degree of Doctor of Medicine for the 
first time in 1899. 

The Cornell University Medical College from its foundation has 
undertaken to carry out two allied activities: the development of phy- 
sicians of the best type and the extension of medical knowledge by 
means of research. The Medical Faculty has held from the beginning 
of its existence the attitude that these two functions are necessary as 
constituting a true university school. It is committed not only to conduct 
teaching of high order but also to study disease and the sciences under- 
lying medicine with the purpose of adding to medical knowledge. 

THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL-CORNELL 
MEDICAL COLLEGE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University Medical College and the New York Hospital 
have been cooperating for a long time in an arrangement for medical 
teaching. In September, 1932, however, the two institutions took up 
occupancy in the same plant. 

The New York Hospital was founded by Royal Charter on June 13, 
1771, in the reign of King George III, and has stood throughout the life 
of the nation as one of the foremost hospitals in the United States, as 
an institution rendering service to the sick and injured, and as a center 
of medical education. For a number of years the Hospital and the Medi- 
cal College had been partially affiliated. In June, 1927, an agreement 

28 



GENERAL STATEMENT 29 

was entered into between Cornell University and the New York Hospi- 
tal by which the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical College Associa- 
tion was formed for the purpose of bringing together their facilities and 
cooperating in the care of patients, in medical education, and in medical 
research. In order to harmonize the interests of the Hospital and of the 
Medical College, the Joint Administrative Board was formed, consisting 
of three representatives of each institution and a seventh member elect- 
ed by the Hospital and by the University. 

Additional endowment was secured by each institution. A group of 
buildings was erected along the East River between 68th and 71st 
Streets, adjoining the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. The 
new plant affords separate buildings for each of the various laboratory 
departments and includes approximately 1,182 hospital beds. Provision 
is made for medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, and 
psychiatry in five distinct clinical units. 

The Faculty of the Medical College and the professional staff of the 
Hospital are organized so as to form one body established on a univer- 
sity basis. 

The new plant affords very favorable conditions for the conduct of 
medical education, for the pursuit of medical research, and for the care 
of patients in all phases of medical practice. 

FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

From the point of view of medical instruction, the facilities provided 
by the plant of the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical College Associa- 
tion are in many respects unexcelled. The plant consists of eleven build- 
ings, joined either directly or by underground passages. These provide 
ample accommodations for the care of hospital patients, for the teaching 
of the clinical branches, and for the various activities connected with the 
work of the preclinical departments of the medical college. 

CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE. Instruction in the medical sciences 
is conducted in a group of buildings extending along York Avenue from 
68th to 70th Streets, centering in a court at the end of 69th Street w^here 
the entrance to the Medical College is located. This group comprises 
four units facing on York Avenue, each of which is five stories high. The 
extreme northern and southern buildings connect with the central 
group by means of two-story structures. In this series of buildings the 
one to the north (unit A) is devoted entirely to the department of 
anatomy; the one next to this on the south (unit B) to bacteriology and 
immunology; the third (unit D) to physiology; the fourth (unit E) to 
biochemistry and pharmacology. A seven-story building (unit C) joins 
the buildings B and D in the center, and in this are the offices of the 
Medical College, the library, and the department of pathology. This 
central building of the College is joined on all floors with the central 



30 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

hospital building. Certain of the laboratories of the department of 
public health and preventive medicine are located in the two-story 
building which adjoins the bacteriology unit to the north, but the 
major part of this department is comprised in the Kips Bay-Yorkville 
Health Center building of the City of New York, located half a block 
west from the Medical College on 69th Street. 

In the main buildings of the Medical College, student laboratories 
and lecture rooms are provided on the second and third floors, and ex- 
tensive facilities for research by staff and students are available on other 
floors. Locker rooms are provided for the use of students. A cafeteria 
under the direction of the chief dietitian of the New^ York Hospital is 
maintained for students and Faculty. 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL. Clinical instruction is given in the five sepa- 
rate clinics forming the New York Hospital. The medical and surgical 
clinics occupy the central hospital building, while the women's clinic, 
the pediatric clinic, and the psychiatric clinic extend from north to 
south, overlooking the East River. Each clinic contains, besides provi- 
sion for bed patients, its own out-patient department, lecture rooms, and 
laboratories for routine study and for clinical research. Special provision 
has also been made for the laboratory work of students. The medical 
clinic occupies the second to fourth floors of the central hospital build- 
ing, with six pavilions for bed patients, three floors for its outpatient 
department, and extensive laboratories for chemical, physiological, and 
biological research. The surgical clinic occupies the pavilions from the 
fifth to the ninth floor, with outpatient and other facilities for the 
various surgical specialists. The operating rooms are on the tenth and 
eleventh floors. Above are six floors containing one hundred rooms for 
private patients, while the living quarters for the resident staff are on 
the six floors at the top of the building. The entire hospital has a capac- 
ity of approximately 1,182 beds. 

The head of each clinic, responsible for the care of patients and the 
conduct of professional services of the hospital, is also professor in 
charge of the corresponding department of the Medical College. Each 
clinical department is staffed in part by teachers and clinicians, includ- 
ing the professor in charge, who devote their entire time to the service 
of the College and Hospital, while other members of these departments 
devote part of their time to private practice. 

OTHER HOSPITALS FOR CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

Although the clinical teaching is conducted largely in the New York 
Hospital, advantage is also taken of special facilities afforded by other 
hospitals. In some of these hospitals the staff appointments are con- 
trolled by the Medical College, while in others the teaching privileges 
have been granted to the members of the staffs who are also members of 
the Medical College Faculty. 



GENERAL STATEMENT 31 

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL. Bellevuc is the cenlral hospital of the New 
York City Department of Hospitals. It contains 3,325 beds and is de- 
voted to the treatment of acute diseases. It is organized in four divisions, 
one of which has been placed at the disposal of the Faculty of Cornell 
University Medical College for medical instruction. The services con- 
ducted by the College include a medical service and a surgical service, 
each of 90 beds, a urological service and a neurological service of ap- 
proximately 60 beds. The staffs of these services are nominated by the 
College from among the members of its Faculty and teaching staff, and 
the Medical College is responsible for the professional conduct of these 
services. 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL. Through the generosity of the late Dr. 
James Douglas, who provided the hospital with an endowment for the 
study and treatment of cancer and allied diseases, the Memorial Hos- 
pital became affiliated in 1914 with Cornell University Medical College. 
The agreement between the Memorial Hospital and the College re- 
quires that the professional staff be named by the Council of the Medical 
College subject to the approval of the board of managers of the hospital. 
The facilities of the hospital, which are of exceptional value in the field 
of cancer, are available for study in this field by the members of the 
hospital staff, and unusual opportunities are afforded for instruction in 
the pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of neoplastic diseases. 

MANHATTAN STATE HOSPITAL (WARD'S ISLAND). This hos- 
pital for the care and treatment of mental diseases accommodates over 
5,000 patients. Through the courtesy of the superintendent, the depart- 
ment of psychiatry is enabled to utiHze this clinical material for bedside 
study of patients and for the instruction of students. 

WILLARD PARKER HOSPITAL. Instruction in infectious diseases is 
conducted at the Willard Parker Hospital, where staff positions are held 
by members of the Faculty and teaching staff who have the privilege of 
conducting medical instruction. 

LINCOLN HOSPITAL. This unit of the New York City Department 
of Hospitals has a bed capacity of 469 and facilities for handling cases in 
all divisions of clinical work. Through cooperative arrangements made 
possible by members of our teaching staff holding assignments on the 
hospital staff, a certain part of the teaching of medicine in the second 
year course is carried out on the wards of Lincoln Hospital. The abun- 
dance of clinical material and the type of disease met with in this insti- 
tution afford a valuable adjunct to the work in this part of the medical 
course. 

THE RUSSELL SAGE INSTITUTE OF PATHOLOGY 

The Institute has been associated with Cornell University Medical 
College since 1913. At first it was affiliated with the Second Medical 



32 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

(Cornell) Division of Bellevue Hospital, but since 1932 it has been in 
the New York Hospital. The Institute has supported work in metabo- 
lism which has been conducted by the members of the departments of 
medicine and physiology. The respiration calorimeter which was oper- 
ated for a number of years by Dr. DuBois at Bellevue Hospital has been 
transferred by the directors of the Institute of the New York Hospital, 
and sufficient funds have been provided for carrying on the important 
metabolic studies by members of the staff. The medical director of the 
Institute is Dr. David P. Barr, Professor of Medicine. 

THE LOOMIS LABORATORY 

Founded in 1886 and located at 414 East 26th Street this institution 
served the purpose of undergraduate instruction in the Medical College 
and provided facilities for original research in the various departments 
of laboratory investigation. The present Medical College building con- 
tains space dedicated to the original Loomis Laboratory and its estab- 
lished objectives. 

THE LIBRARY 

The reading room of the library is situated on the second floor of the 
central group of laboratory buildings, directly over the entrance of the 
Medical College. The current journals are kept in racks around three 
sides of the room. The book stacks are directly behind and open to the 
reading room, extending down to the subbasement with six floors of 
stacks and accommodations for about 100,000 volumes. There are also 
a library seminar room and several rooms for the library staff. 

The library contains at present over 41,000 volumes, largely made up 
of complete sets of important journals in the fields of clinical medicine 
and the medical sciences, in English, German, and French. There are 
also well-selected collections of monographs, textbooks, and reprints. 

Several of the departments of the Medical College have libraries con- 
taining journals, monographs, and textbooks pertaining especially to 
the subject matter of the departments. These serve to supplement in a 
useful way the scope of the main library. 

The library is under the direction of a committee of the Faculty and 
in charge of a trained librarian who gives instruction to students on the 
proper methods of using the library and of searching medical literature. 

A special fund, maintained in memory of Alfred Moritz Michaelis, 
M.D. 1925, Cornell, who died the year after his graduation, is used for 
the purchase of books of cultural and historic values in medicine. 

In addition to the college library, students may obtain certain priv- 
ileges at the library of the New York Academy of Medicine, Fifth Ave- 
nue and 103rd Street, the second largest medical library in the United 
States. 



Requirements for Admission 
and Graduation 



THE FACULTY of Cornell University Medical College, in defining 
the qualifications for admission to the medical profession, attaches 
particular importance to the liberal culture and general education im- 
plied by the acquisition of a college degree. Because of the acceleration 
of college training under the Army and Navy programs during the war, 
the degree requirement was suspended. A return to the college degree as 
a prerequisite for acceptance has now been adopted by Faculty and 
Trustee action, and only the following candidates for the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine will be admitted to Cornell Medical College. 

1. Graduates of approved colleges or scientific schools; or 

2. Seniors in good standing in Cornell University or in any other 
approved college or scientific school whose faculty will permit them to 
substitute the first year of the professional course for the fourth year in 
arts and sciences, and who will confer upon them the Bachelor's degree 
upon the satisfactory completion of the first year of the course in the 
Cornell University >fedical College. Students from institutions other 
than Cornell University seeking admission under this clause must have 
a statement from the Dean of their college signifying approval of this 
plan for fulfilling the requirements for the degree. Any student failing 
to receive his degree under this arrangement will not be admitted to 
the second year of the medical course. 

3. Persons who, while not possessing a Bachelor's degree, give evi- 
dence by examination that they have acquired an equivalent education 
and a training sufficient to enable them to profit by the instruction 
offered in the Medical College. This rule is intended to apply to stu- 
dents of foreign universities. 

The basic premedical requirements which all students must fulfill to 
qualify for admission to the study of medicine in New York State are set 
forth in the "Regulations of the Commissioner of Education," the perti- 
nent part of which is as follows: "A candidate shall present evidence of 
having satisfactorily completed two years of study toward a liberal arts 
degree registered by the Department; or its equivalent as deteiniined by 
the Commissioner. The required two years of college study shall include 
at least 6 semester hours each in English, physics, biology or zoology, 
and general chemistry, and 3 semester hours in organic chemistry." 

33 



34 



CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 



Although the requirements outHned above form the basis of eHgibil- 
ity for admission to the medical course, they should be considered as 
representing the irreducible minimum. The list contains a total of 
twenty-seven credit points which probably represents sufficient time to 
enable the student to obtain a basic preparation in these different 
fields. In many colleges, however, additional credits in one or more of 
these departments are required of the candidate in order to satisfy 
major requirements for the degree. In making the choice of elective 
courses, consideration should be given to the principle that thorough 
training in the sciences is essential. On the other hand, choosing too 
many elective courses in these departments may not provide the most 
acceptable preparation for medicine, since it tends to limit the time 
available for study in other departments offering work of a broad educa- 
tional value. Students planning to study medicine should bear in mind 
that bacteriology, immunology, human physiolog)^ and abnormal 
psychology are properly subjects of the medical and not of the pre- 
medical curriculum. In planning premedical work students are advised 
to elect subjects which will lay a broad foundation for medical study 
rather than to anticipate courses required as a part of the medical 
curriculum. 

Each year the Admissions Committee selects an entering class of ap- 
proximately 83 students from a group of more than 1,500 applicants. 
The members of the committee are keenly aware of their serious re- 
sponsibility in selecting students who have the native ability, traits of 
character, soundness of personality, and adequate financial responsibil- 
ity that will enable them to finish satisfactorily their course in the 
Medical College. A serious obligation to society is also acknowledged 
by a medical school. It must graduate only those persons who can be 
expected, with reasonable certainty, to do creditable work in some field 
of medicine after graduation. The Admissions Committee selects from 
all the applicants those who seem best to fulfill such requirements. 

In selecting a relatively small class from a large group of wtII qualified 
applicants, the Committee is mindful of the sound and liberal traditions 
of Cornell University. They attempt to select well qualified students 
with varied backgrounds— from various geographic areas, from different 
socio-economic groups, and from varying types of educational institu- 
tions. As to grade averages, the Committee needs to satisfy itself that the 
applicant's scholastic record, both as to courses taken and grades re- 
ceived, gives reasonable assurance that the individual can do the 
medical curricular work without undue difficulty. Grading systems vary 
so much from school to school that no specific grade can be categorically 
stated as minimally acceptable. To be accepted for admission a student 
must have a satisfactory scholastic record. Beyond that, grades are con- 
sidered less important than the personal attributes— emotional stability, 



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ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 



35 




<PPU 



36 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

sound character, healthy personahty, intellectual maturity, strong moti- 
vation, and ability to cooperate. The Medical College Admission Test 
results are helpful in appraising an applicant's academic ability. No one 
pattern of extracurricular activities is considered more meritorious 
than another. The Admissions Committee looks at each applicant as a 
total individual, insofar as that is possible with the information obtain- 
able. Those applicants are considered acceptable who have the qual- 
ities, abilities, and capabilities considered necessary in a person who 
hopes to become a physician. Eligibility for admission is determined 
without regard for race, creed, color, religion, or national origin. Ad- 
mission policies are in conformity with the policy of the state in regard 
to the American ideal of equality of opportunity as embodied in the 
Education Practices Act. 

As a general rule the courses given in professional schools of phar- 
macy, veterinary medicine, optometry, agriculture, and the like are not 
considered as fulfilling adequately the admission requirements. 

APPLICATIONS FOR ADMISSION 

All requests for application forms and inquiries regarding dates for 
submitting applications should be addressed to the Committee on Ad- 
missions, 1300 York Avenue, New^ York City. In making application for 
admission, the regular form issued for this purpose must be filled out 
and submitted to the Office of Admissions. Candidates are accepted for 
only one class in advance. \Vith the large number of students making 
application in recent years, it has been necessary to assign a definite pe- 
riod for distributing application forms. For a class entering in Septem- 
ber of a certain year, the application forms may be obtained on request 
beginning September 1 of the previous year. Applications should be 
completed during the fall, and no application w^ill be accepted after 
January 15. A charge of S5 is made for submitting an application. This 
fee should be made payable to Cornell University Medical College in 
the form of a check or money order and is not returnable. 

Applications are passed upon by the Committee on Admissions after 
all credentials have been filed. As soon as the Committee takes favorable 
action upon an applicant, a letter of acceptance is immediately forward- 
ed to him, and the accepted applicant is required to make a deposit of 
S50 within a specified time. This deposit is not returnable but is credited 
toward the first tuition payment. If the accepted student fails to make 
the deposit in the stipulated time, he forfeits his place on the class roll. 

It is impossible for the Committee on Admissions to hold personal 
conferences with all candidates for admission as the number is too 
great, but selected individuals from the group of applicants receive an 
invitation to appear before members of the Committee. 

A student ^vho has previously attended another medical school and 
has been dropped for poor scholarship or unfavorable conduct is not an 



ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 37 

acceptable candidate for admission to any class in Cornell Medical (Col- 
lege. It is inadvisable, therefore, for one with this background to go 
through the formality of submitting an application. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

When vacancies occur, students may be admitted to advanced stand- 
ing. 

Application for a place in one of the upper classes should be filed 
according to the procedure described for admission to the first year class. 
Accepted applicants are required to make the deposit of $50. Applicants 
must not only furnish acceptable evidence of having satisfactorily com- 
pleted in an approved medical school all of the work required of stu- 
dents of the class they wish to enter, but also of having completed the 
conditions of admission to the first year class at Cornell University Med- 
ical College. They must present a certificate of honorable dismissal 
from the medical school or schools they have attended, and they may 
be required to take examinations in any of the medical courses taken at 
another school. 

Although a certain number of students are regularly admitted from 
other institutions to enter the third year class at Cornell University 
Medical College, rarely have there been acceptances made of students 
to enter the fourth year on the basis of work at another medical school. 
Candidates seeking admission to the fourth year are required to come 
before the clinical departments for a thorough examination before final 
action is taken on their applications. 

Persons who have received the degree of Doctor of Medicine at an- 
other institution will not be accepted as candidates for this degree at 
Cornell University Medical College. Likewise, persons who have finish- 
ed all or part of the course in dentistry and seek a transfer to medicine 
are discouraged from making application here since Cornell does not 
have a department of dentistry and makes no provision for adapting the 
teaching in this subject to the medical curriculum. 

ADVANCEMENT AND EXAMINATION 

The entire medical curricidiun is arranged in four comses, or aca- 
demic years, and the student advances in steps of an academic year at a 
time. It is necessary that he complete all the subjects listed in a given 
academic year before taking up the next succeeding group of subjects, 
and to be readmitted to the Medical College in one of the advanced 
years (second, third, or fourth) he must be approved for promotion by 
the Faculty. 

Any student who by quality of work or conduct indicates an imfitness 
to enter the profession of medicine may, at the discretion of the Faculty, 
be required at any time to withdraw from the Medical College. 



38 ClORNKLL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

At the close of the academic year examinations are given in all subjects 
except those extending through a part of the year only, in which exam- 
inations may be held at the close of the course in the hours allotted 
thereto. In making up a student's rating in a given course, all work 
covered in that subject during the year is taken into account, and due 
weight is assigned to the effort he puts in his work, his seriousness of 
purpose, and his scholastic resourcefulness, as well as the results of the 
final examination. 

A final rating is made for each student at the end of the academic 
year, based on the results of his performance in all courses in the cur- 
riculum of that year. These final ratings of students are made on the 
recommendations of the Committee on Promotion and Graduation; 
then they are reviewed and formally acted on by the Faculty. The 
Faculty ratings classify all students of the medical course under one of 
four groups as follows: 

1. Students with no encumbrances in any subject are recorded as 
"passed." This rating confers eligibility for readmission into the Medical 
College in the next higher class, unless by reason of conduct the Faculty 
considers the student unsuited for the medical profession. 

2. Students with an unsatisfactory rating in 40 per cent or more of 
the required hours in a given year are recorded as "not passed." A 
rating of "not passed" carries ineligibility for readmission into the 
Medical College. 

3. Students with an unsatisfactory rating in less than 40 per cent of 
the required hours of a given year are recorded as "conditioned." A 
"conditioned' student has failures in certain required courses, and he 
may be reexamined in these subjects, but only after pursuing additional 
work under the direction of the head of the department in which a 
failure has occurred. Students who fail on reexaminations are ineligible 
for readmission into the Medical College, unless under special circum- 
stances they are permitted by the Faculty to repeat courses in which 
their work is deficient. 

4. Students with uniformly low grades in most subjects of the course 
for two years or more are subject to special review by the Faculty, and 
any student with a record of this kind may be deemed unqualified to 
enter the medical profession. A rating in this group carries ineligibility 
for readmission into the Medical College. 

It is a well established policy of the Medical College to make no an- 
nouncement to students of grades received in any subject of the medical 
course. At the close of each academic year, however, students are in- 
formed of the quarter of the class in which their weighted average score 
places them in the order of class standing. 

A transcript of the Medical College record of a student or graduate 
will be mailed on his request to accredited hospitals and to educational 



ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 39 

or other well-recognized institutions as credentials in support ol his ap- 
plication for a position or promotion. All transcripts are marked "con- 
fidential" and carry the instructions that they are not to be turned over 
to the candidate. This ruling is for the purpose of avoiding possible loss 
and fraudulent use of an official document of the Medical College. The 
Medical College makes no charge for sending out transcripts of record. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine must have at- 
tained the age of twenty-one years and be of good moral character. 

They must have completed successfully four full courses of at least 
eight months each as regular matriculated medical students, the last of 
which must have been in Cornell University Medical College. They 
must have satisfactorily completed all the required work of the medical 
curriculum and must have passed all prescribed examinations. At the 
end of the fourth year every student who has fulfilled these requirements 
will be recommended to the President and Trustees of Cornell Univer- 
sity for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

EXAMINATIONS FOR MEDICAL LICENSURE 

Graduates of Cornell University Medical College are admitted un- 
conditionally to the examinations for license to practice medicine in all 
states of the United States. 

Students and graduates of Cornell University Medical College are ad- 
mitted to the examinations of the National Board of Medical Exam- 
iners, whose certificate is recognized by the respective authorities of 
England, Scotland, and Ireland. Although national in scope and organ- 
ized under the laws of the District of Columbia, the National Board of 
Medical Examiners is not to be confused with a federal government 
agency. For information write to the National Board of Medical Ex- 
aminers, 225 South Fifteenth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



General Information 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

ALL FEES for instruction and other charges are paid at the Business 
. Office of the Medical College, Room F-106, 1300 York Avenue, 
New York 21, N.Y. 

Veterans receiving federal or state educational benefits are required 
to report to the Veterans Affairs Office, Room A-131, immediately after 
registering. 

The Board of Trustees of Cornell University reserves the right to 
change the schedule of fees of the Medical College when deemed expe- 
dient. 

APPLICATION FEE 

A charge made for reviewing an application | 5.00 

ACCEPTANCE DEPOSIT 50.00 

Each student admitted is given notice of favorable action on 
his application and a limited time (usually two weeks) in 
which to decide if he will enroll in the entering class. His 
name is not placed on the class list until the acceptance fee 
is paid. The fee is credited toward the tuition charge and is 
not returnable if the student fails to enter. 

MATRICULATION FEE (payable only once) 10.00 

Tt//r/OA/^ FEE, for academic year 900.00 

This charge is payable at the beginning of the academic year, 
or in three equal parts, the first of which must be made at 
registration. For fourth year students in the academic year of 
1953-54, the first installment will be due on or before Septem- 
ber 14. No refund or rebate will be made in any instance. 

STUDENT HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE, for calen- 
dar year 19.20 

This insurance is carried through the Associated Hospital 
Service (Blue Cross plan) and may be extended to wives and 
families of married students at additional cost. This com- 
pulsory insurance plan assures a limited period of care to all 
students during the time they are members in good standing 
in the Medical College. 

40 



GENERAL INFORMATION 41 

BREAKAGE DEPOSIT 10.00 

This deposit is required of first and second year students at 
the beginning of each academic year and will be returned, 
less the amount charged for breakage, at the end of the 
second year. 

GRADUATION FEE 25.00 

This charge is payable two months before graduation. 

BOOKS AND INSTRUMENTS, EXCLUSIVE OF MICROSCOPES 
The average cost is approximately $135 a year, distributed as follows: 
first year, $150; second year, $215; third year, $125; fourth year, $50. 

MICROSCOPES 

Each student is required to provide himself with a microscope of an 
approved type. The College Book Store handles all makes, and students 
placing their orders here are given every consideration in the purchase 
price on the instrument they select. 

RESIDENCE AND LIVING EXPENSES 

F. W. Olin Hall, student residence, will be completed for occupancy 
in September, 1954. This building was made possible by a generous gift 
from the Olin Foundation. The residence is located on York Avenue at 
69th Street, directly across the street from the Medical College entrance. 
It will contain a gymnasium, snack bar, lounge rooms, and 281 residence 
rooms. Each residence room is furnished as a single bedroom-study, but, 
since each two rooms have a connecting bath, they may be used as a 
suite for two students if desired. The rooms are completely furnished, 
and linen service is provided. It is anticipated that rental will be $35 
per month. One floor is reserved for women students, and nonhouse- 
keeping facilities for married students will be available. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Members of the first year class and students transferred to advanced 
standing from other colleges are recjuired to have a physical examina- 
tion by a member of the Student Health Staff. In addition, each student 
in the Medical College must report once a year for an X-ray examina- 
tion of the lungs. All members of the fourth year class are called for a 
reexamination, and a careful check of the findings is made with those 
presented at the time the student entered. Students pay no fee for the 
yearly X-ray examination, nor for the services of the Student Health 
Staff, but they are charged for any special X-ray studies. Office hours are 
held from twelve to two o'clock daily by the Student Health Staff. 
Health records are kept and students advised concerning their physical 
condition and general health. All cases of illness must be reported to 



42 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

the College office. Students may have in attendance physicians of their 
own choice, but a reasonable amount of cooperation between such 
physicians and the College's Health Service is expected. 

PRIZES 

1. FOR GENERAL EFFICIENCY. In commemoration of John Met- 
calfe Polk, an instructor in this college who was graduated from Cornell 
University Medical College June 7, 1899, and died on March 29, 1904, 
prizes will be presented at each commencement to the three students 
having the highest standing for the four years' work. Only those who 
have taken the full course of study at Cornell University Medical Col- 
lege are eligible. The first prize is $250, the second $100, and the third 
$50. 

2. FOR EFFICIENCY IN OPHTHALMOLOGY. Two prizes, the 
first of $50, and the second of $25, are offered by Professor Bernard 
Samuels to the two students of the graduating class who make the best 
records in ophthalmology. 

3. FOR EFFICIENCY IN OTOLARYNGOLOGY. Two prizes, the 
first of $50, and the second of $25, are offered by members of the staff of 
otolaryngology to the two students of the graduating class who make 
the best record in this specialty. 

4. FOR EFFICIENCY IN OBSTETRICS. Two prizes, the first of 
$50, the second of $25, have been endowed by an anonymous donor in 
recognition of the work of Dr. Gustav Seeligman, in obstetrics, to be 
given to the two students of the graduating class who have made the 
best records in obstetrics. 

5. FOR EFFICIENCY IN GENERAL MEDICINE. The income 
from $1,000 is offered as a prize for general efficiency in the department 
of medicine, in commemoration of Alfred Moritz Michaelis, who was 
graduated from Cornell University Medical College on June 11, 1925, 
and who died dining his internship at Mt. Sinai Hospital, April 24, 
1926. Presented at each commencement to a member of the graduating 
class who has pursued the full course at Cornell University Medical 
College. 

6. THE MARY ALDRICH FUND. In memory of William Mecklen- 
bing Polk, M.D., LL.D., first dean of the Medical College, two prizes 
are ottered for proficiency in research to regularly matriculated students 
of the Cornell University Medical College, the first of $150, and the 
second of $50. Members of all classes are eligible for these prizes. 

The awards are made at the end of each academic year for the best 
report presented in writing of research work done by students, or for 
valuable reviews and logical presentations on medical subjects not to 



GENERAL INFORMATION 43 

be found fully considered in a single text or reference book. If the 
papers submitted are not considered worthy of special commendation 
the prizes will be withheld. 

Papers are submitted in quadruplicate in a scaled envelope marked 
"Dean William Mecklenburg Polk Memorial Prize Committee" and 
must be in the Administration Office not later than three weeks prior to 
the end of each academic year. 

The committee of awards for this prize consists of two members of 
the Faculty from laboratory departments and two from clinical depart- 
ments. 

For 1953 the William Mecklenbiug Polk Prize awards for research 
were: first prize: Abraham Isaac Schweid; second prize: Harry Warren 
Daniell. 

7. THE WILLIAM C. THRO MEMORIAL FUND. Established in 
memory of William C. Thro of the class of 1901 whose all-absorbing 
interest in and devotion to clinical pathology found expression in the 
teaching and practice of this subject in his alma mater continuously 
from 1910 to 1938. This prize award is to be given to the student show- 
ing the best record in the course in clinical pathology. The candidate for 
the prize is to be recommended by the professor of clinical pathology 
and the award made by the Committee on Prizes and Scholarships. 

8. THE HERMAN L. JACOBIUS PRIZE IN PATHOLOGY. Es- 
tablished in 1945 by a gift from Dr. Lawrence Jacobius and his friends 
in memory of his son who was killed in action in the Netherlands on 
September 28, 1944. Dr. Herman L. Jacobius was a member of the class 
of 1939. The income of the fund is available annually to the stucient of 
the third or fourth year class who, in the opinion of the staff of the de- 
partment of pathology, merits recognition for high scholastic attain- 
ments and outstanding performance in the subject of pathology. If in 
any year no student merits the distinction the award will be withheld. 

9. THE BORDEN UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH AWARD. 
The terms of this grant by The Borden Company Foundation, Inc., pro- 
vide for awards of $500 dining any one calendar year for a period of 
five years. The award will be made under tlie following terms and con- 
ditions: 

1. All persons in the graduating class of the Medical College of Cornell Univer- 
sity who, during any year while enrolled in the College, have carried out under- 
graduate research in the medical field shall be eligible for the Borden Undergrad- 
uate Research Award in Medicine, The award shall be presented at the time of 
his graduation to that eligible person whose research has been determined by the 
Medical College to be the most meritorious performed by all similarly eligible 
persons. Originality and thoroughness of research shall be of primary consideration. 

2. In the event that the Dean shall find it inappropriate to make the award in 
any one year, the award may be deferred to another year. Only one award, however, 
will be made during any one calendar year. 



44 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Papers submitted for this prize should be in quadruplicate and must 
be in the Administration Office not later than three weeks before the 
end of the term. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

1. THE JOHN METCALFE POLK SCHOLARSHIP. A gift under 
the will of William Mecklenburg Polk, the first Dean of the Medical 
College, is awarded annually by the Faculty. The scholarship amounts 
to about 3200 a year. 

2. THE THORNE SHA W SCHOLARSHIP FUND. This fund pro 
vides three scholarships designated as: 

First: A scholarship of approximately S400 available to students after 

at least two years of study in the Medical College. 
Second: Two scholarships of approximately $200 each available to 

students after at least one year of study in the Medical College. 
These scholarships are awarded by the Faculty upon nomination by 
the Committee on Scholarships and Prizes. They are awarded annually 
in June and are for one year only. Students receiving the scholarships 
are notified of the award at the end of the session. 

3. MARY F. HALL SCHOLARSHIP. The income, amounting to 
about 3 180 annually, from a fund established by bequest of Miss Mary 
F. Hall, is available to any woman student in Cornell University Medi- 
cal College who needs its aid and who is a bona fide resident of the 
State of New York and w^as such prior to admission to the College. 

4. THE 1936 JOHN AND KA THERINE MA YER SCHOLARSHIP 
FUND. A five thousand dollar fund established in 1936, the income 
from which is annually available to meritorious students who need its 
aid, and who have completed one or more years of the regular medical 
course. The award is for one year only, but tenable for a second or third 
year providing the qualifications of the candidate merit a reaward. If 
during any year the income from the fund is not used as stated above, 
then it may be used for such research work, or otherwise, as in the 
judgment of the Faculty (or Trustees) may be deemed best. 

5. THE 1939 JOHN AND KA THERINE MA YER SCHOLARSHIP 
FUND. A five thousand dollar fund established in 1939, the income 
from which is annually available to meritorious students who need its 
aid, and who have completed one or more years of the regular medical 
course. The award is for one year only, but tenable for a second or 
third year providing the qualifications of the candidate merit a re- 
award. If during any year the income from the fund is not used as stated 
above, then it may be used for such research work, or otherwise, as in 
the judgment of the Faculty (or Trustees) may be deemed best. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 45 

6. THE JEREMIAH S. FERGUSON SCHOLARSHIP. Established 
in memory ot Jeremiah S. Ferguson, who throughout his long connec- 
tion with the Medical College, of somewhat more than forty years, de- 
voted much effort to helping students with their individual problems 
and promoting their professional career. The fund amounts to $5000, 
the income from which, approximately $200 a year, is awarded annually 
by the Committee on Scholarships and Prizes to a student or students 
in the third and fourth year classes in the Medical College who are in 
need of financial aid and who by conduct and scholarship have proved 
worthy investments. 

7. THE CHARLES RUPERT STOCKARD SCHOLARSHIP. A ten 
thousand dollar fund was established in 1939 by a friend of the late 
Charles Rupert Stockard, Professor of Anatomy in the Cornell Univer- 
sity Medical College, 191 1-39. The interest of this fund is to be awarded 
either to one student (approximately $400) or to two students (ap- 
proximately $200 each) who have shown promise in the work in the de- 
partment of anatomy and who are desirous of doing advanced work in 
this department. The scholarships are to be awarded by the Executive 
Faculty upon nomination by the head of the department of anatomy. 

8. THE DR. JOHN A. HEIM SCHOLARSHIPS. Established under 
the will of John A. Heim of the class of 1905 to provide such number of 
scholarships in the Medical College as there shall be funds available for 
that purpose. The awards are to be made to regularly matriculated med- 
ical students who are in need of financial assistance, as provided for in 
the terms of the bequest. 

First year students are eligible, provided they meet the standards pre- 
scribed. 

9. THE DR. CHARLES I. HYDE '10 AND EVA HYDE SCHOL- 
ARSHIP FUND. Established in memory of their daughter, Anita Shir- 
ley Hyde. The terms of this endowment provide that the income be 
available annually to meritorious students who have completed one year 
of the regular medical course and are in need of assistance. The income 
from this endowment amounts to about $100 yearly. 

10. THE DR. JACQUES SAPHIER SCHOLARSHIP FUND. Es- 
tablished in memory of Dr. Jacques Conrad Saphier (Lieutenant, j.g., 
USNR) of the class of 1940, who was killed in action on August 21, 
1942, at Guadalcanal while in the performance of his duty. The income 
from this fund shall be awarded annually to a meritorious student of the 
Cornell University Medical College who has completed at least one 
year of work, who needs its aid, and who, in the opinion of the Faculty 
merits the recognition for which this scholarship was established. 

11. THE ELISE STRANG L'ESPERANCE SCHOLARSHIP. This 
award is maintained by the personal contributions of Dr. Elise Strang 



46 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

L'Esperance, whose interests in the educational advancements of the 
Medical College have continued lor many years. The value of this schol- 
arship is $1,000, and the award is to be given annually to the most out 
standing woman medical student in the fourth year class in Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College. The selection of the recipient of this scholarship 
is to be made by the Dean in consultation with persons suggested under 
the original donation. 

12. THE SAG AN FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP. An annual 
scholarship of $500 to be awarded to a student in Cornell University 
Medical College, to be selected by the College on the basis of scholar- 
ship and need, without reference to race, color, sex, or creed. In the 
event the Foimdation should discontinue the award, at least one year's 
notice shall be given the Medical College. A special blank issued by the 
Sagan Foundation should be obtained from the Dean's Office by stu- 
dents making application for this scholarship. 

13. RUTH HOLLOHAN SCHOLARSHIP FUND. This fund was 
established by the terms of the w^ill of Jessie L. HoUohan in memory of 
Ruth Hollohan. The income is to be used for scholarships for students 
in the Medical College, with first consideration to be given to entering 
students of good scholarship who are in need of financial assistance. 

14. PFIZER SCHOLARSHIP FUND FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS. 

This scholarship fund, amounting to $1,000, has been established by 
Charles Pfizer & Co., Inc. This fund may be divided among no more 
than three students to help defray the cost of tuition, books, and living 
exj^enses. It is to be awarded to first or second year students. 

15. THE WALLACE D. GARRABRANDT SCHOLARSHIP. Es- 
tablished by Mabel G. Gormley. This scholarship, amounting to ap- 
proximately $200, is to be awarded annually by the Committee on 
Scholarships to a regularly matriculated medical student of good 
scholarship who is in need of financial assistance. 

BURSARY FOR WOMEN STUDENTS 

THE MARIE AND JOHN ZIMMERMAN FUND. A sum from this 
fund will be available this year to certain women students as a memorial 
to Marie Zimmerman, Sr. The candidates will be chosen in accordance 
with the purposes of the donor as set forth in the following terms: 

"It is the desire of the Fund that Dr. Connie M. Guion and the As- 
sistant Dean assign the proceeds of the donations to one or more women 
medical students who are financially in need of assistance and whose 
academic standing leads them to believe that the recipients of the awards 
will make a success in their profession." 

The objectives and method of assigning these awards will follow the 
principles accompanying the donations received during the present 
year. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 47 

LOAN FUNDS 

1. THE 1923 LOAN FUND. The income from this fund amounts to 
$350 a year and is available as a loan to students needing financial assist- 
ance, prefably to a third year student. 

2. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION LOAN FUNDS. The Alumni Associa- 
tion of the Medical College is able to aid a few students in meeting their 
expenses by the Jessie P. Andresen Memorial Fund and the Class Student 
Loan Funds. The loans made from these funds will be administered by 
the Board of Directors of the Alumni Association. The Medical College 
is consulted in making these awards. Students in the upper classes will 
be given preference. 

3. STUDENT LOAN FUND. A revolving fund contributed through 
different sources including The Kellogg Foundation, The Charles Hay- 
den Foundation, and the Student Book Store is available to students in 
all classes who are in need of assistance. Every effort is made within the 
limitations of the financial structure of the institution to help students 
who by reason of unforeseen circumstances get into money difficulties. A 
special committe considers each case on its individual merits. A student 
having indebtedness to the Medical College in other ways than formal 
loans is ineligible for graduation. 

ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA 

Alpha Omega Alpha is a nonsecret Medical College Honor Society, 
membership in which is based upon scholarship, moral qualifications be- 
ing satisfactoi7. It was organized at the College of Medicine of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, Chicago, August 25, 1902. A.O.A. is the only order of 
its kind on this continent. 

Elections are made from students who have fully completed two years 
of a four year curriculum, by imanimous vote of the active members 
acting on recommendations made by Facidty advisers. Not more than 
one-sixth of any class may be elected. As aspects of and indispensable to 
true scholarship are included open-mindedness, individuality, original- 
ity, demonstration of studious attitude, and promise of intellectual 
growth. 

The Cornell Chapter of A.O.A. was organized May 2, 1910. A large 
number of the Faculty are members. The Chapter sponsors an annual 
open lecture delivered in the Medical College Auditorium on a cultural 
or historical phase of medicine. 

The members elected from the graduating class of 1953 are the fol- 
lowing: Barbara Bates, David A. Blumenstock, Julia L. Freitag, George 
R. Fuller, William A. Grattan, Robert S. Grayson, Ward O. Griffen, 
Calvin M. Kunin, Charles W. Pearce, Jack Richard, James Strickler, 
Clifford H. Urban, Heinz Valtin, Edward A. ^\^olfson. ' 



48 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

SIGMA XI 

Sigma Xi, a national honorary society devoted to the encouragement 
of scientific research, was founded at Cornell University at Ithaca in 
1886. An active branch of the Cornell Chapter is maintained at the 
Medical College. Many members of the Faculty and research staff are 
members of Sigma Xi and share in the activities of the Cornell Chapter. 
Medical students are eligible for election to membership in Sigma Xi on 
the basis of proved ability to carry on original medical research and on 
nomination by active members of the Cornell Chapter. 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Officers 

Irving S. Wright, '26 President 

William Barnes, '37 Vice President 

Keith O. Guthrie, Jr., '40 Secretary 

Henry A. Carr, '35 Treasurer 

Directors 
Three Year Term: Nelson W. Cornell, '21; Mary Ann Payne, '45. 
Two Year Term: Paul Reznikoff, '20; Connie M. Guion, '17. 
One Year Term: William H. Cassebaum, '31; Alphonse E. Tim- 
panelli, '36. 

Alumni Quarterly 
David N. Barrows, '12 Editor 

Willis M. Weeden, '19 Associate Editor 

Edward F. Stanton, '35 Associate Editor 

Miss Ellen R. Phillips Executive Secretary 

Each graduate of Cornell University Medical College is automatically 
considered a member of the Alumni Association, and the dues are $5 a 
year. The activities of the Association include a quarterly publication, 
an annual banquet, student and faculty parties, student loan funds, and 
an employment bureau. The Association maintains an office at 1300 
York Avenue. 

An annual appeal for funds for the use of the Medical College is made 
to members of the Association. 



Educational Policies 
and Plan of Instruction 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE is divided into twelve major depart- 
ments, seven of which are primarily concerned with the sciences un- 
derlying clinical medicine. They are anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, 
bacteriology and immunology, pathology, pharmacology, and public 
health and preventive medicine. Five departments have as their major 
functions the study, treatment, and prevention of hiniian diseases, and 
maternity care. These are medicine, surgery, pediatrics, psychiatry, and 
obstetrics and gynecology. 

The heads of these major departments, together with the President of 
the University and the Dean, constitute the Executive Facidty, which is 
responsible for the educational policies of the College. 

Courses required to be completed by each student before the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine is conferred by Cornell University are offered by 
each department. These courses are arranged, in their sequence and 
duration, to develop logically the knowledge and training of students 
and to build up gradually the requirements needed for graduation as 
Doctor of Medicine. The various departments also offer courses and 
opportunities for special study open to regular medical students, to 
candidates for advanced degrees in the Graduate School of Cornell 
University, and to qualified advanced students of medicine not candi- 
dates for degrees. 

Medical know-ledge is so extensive that only a small part of that 
needed for a successful career in medicine can be acquired during the 
time devoted to medical study by the medical college curriculum. The 
time devoted by the prospective physician to his preparation for the 
practice of medicine includes at least one and often many more years of 
graduate medical education as intern or resident of a hospital, cither in 
clinical or laboratory work or both. The required period of study at 
Cornell LTniversity Medical College extends over four academic years 
of at least thirty-three weeks each. 

As medical science and medical practice may be pursued in a variety 
of ways, it is the policy of the College to encourage the student to vary 
his course of study according to his special interests and particular 
talents as far as is consistent with meeting the requirements for the de- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine. 

49 



50 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

A thesis is not required for the degree of Doctor of Medicine, but 
students are encouraged to engage in individual work as far as their time 
permits, with the hope that they may accompHsh results worthy of 
publication. It is desirable, therefore, for some students to devote all 
their free time to a single subject in which they have a special interest. 

The development of technical and scientific proficiency in the various 
special fields of clinical medicine is not encouraged during the regular 
medical course but must await adequate training after graduation. 

The first year of study is devoted to anatomy, biochemistry, physiol- 
ogy, bacteriology, and psychobiology. 

In the second year, the subjects of physiology and bacteriology are 
completed, and the student takes up work in parasitology, pathology, 
pharmacology, physical diagnosis, psychiatry, neurology, clinical path- 
ology, public health, ophthalmology, radiology, and surgery. 

During the third and fourth years, students are divided into small 
groups for practical work in the various clinics and for elective work. 
The third year class meets at noon each day for clinical lectures and 
demonstrations. 

Time for elective work is provided in the fourth year, after students 
have had opportunities to acquire some knowledge of the medical sci- 
ences and of clinical medicine. Students are advised to consult inform- 
ally members of the Faculty in regard to the use of their time for elective 
work. It is deemed best not to establish a formal advisory system. 

The Faculty expressly reserves the right to make alterations in the 
curriculum whenever advisable and without previous notice to students. 



I 



Description oj Courses 

ANATOMY 

, Professor of Anatomy, 

CHARLES M. BERRY, Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

JOHN MacLeod, Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

WILLL\M A. GEOHEGAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Anatomy. 

THEODORE C. GREENE, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

WILBUR D. HAGAMEN, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

LAWRENCE W. HANLON, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

ERNEST W. LAMPE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Anatomy. 

JOHN F. SEYBOLT, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

DAVID ANDERSON, Instructor in Anatomy. 

ROBERT L. BEALS, Fellow in Anatomy. 

IRENA KOPROWSKA, Research Fellow in Anatomy. 

JOHN J. TAYLOR, Assistant in Anatomy. 

EMBRYOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY . . . The work in embryology pre- 
supposes a general knowledge of the subject, particularly that of the 
early development of the chick. It embraces a thorough study of the de- 
velopment of the mammalian embryo in the light of our knowledge of 
the evolution of the human body. Malformations resulting from devel- 
opmental disturbances are broadly considered. The course is closely cor- 
related with that of gross anatomy. 

The work in histology includes the histogenesis and microscopic struc- 
tures of all organs of the human body with the exception of the central 
nervous system {see Neuroanatomy). Emphasis is laid on relation of 
structure to fimction. 

The tissues are studied principally by means of stained sections and 
practice is given in rapid identification of their diagnostic features. 
Demonstrations of living material are made, and opportunities arc 
offered for acquiring the essentials of histological technique. 

Laboratory and lectures, 180 hours, first and second terms. Required 
of all first year students. 

NEUROANATOMY ... A laboratory course on the gross and micro- 
scopic anatomy of the human nervous system. Special emphasis is laid 
on the more important pathw^ays and their functions. 

Laboratory and demonstrations, 84 hours. Required of all first year 
students during the second term. 

GROSS ANATOMY OF THE HUMAN BODY . . . This is taught by 
means of laboratory exercises and dissections. The rccjuired work in- 

51 



52 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

eludes: (a) dissection of the part; (b) demonstrations, study, and dis- 
cussion upon dissected and prepared specimens. 

Total laboratory hours, 374. First and second terms of the first year. 
Required of all first year students. 

ELECTIVE COURSES. . .Subject to the approval of the department 
of anatomy, its equipment is available to medical students wishing to 
pursue advanced work or research in anatomical subjects. Members of 
the staff will direct the progress of such undertakings. Schedules to fit 
individual cases will be arranged for a limited number of third and 
fourth year students who may devote the major part or all of their elec- 
tive time in this department. Such elective time may be devoted to one 
of the following: (1) a review of dissection; (2) dissection of a foetus; 
(3) microscopic anatomy; (4) embryology; (5) special research prob- 
lems. 

COURSES OPEN TO SPECIAL STUDENTS 

GROSS ANATOMY . . .A limited number of graduates in medicine 
will be provided with material for dissection of the human body. Fee, 
$50 for a term of ten weeks; or for entire dissection, $100. 

COURSE IN SURGICAL ANATOMY . . . This course consists of an 
extensive review of surgical anatomy with demonstrations and dissec- 
tions. It is specially designed for candidates for the American Board of 
Surgery and is in charge of Dr. Ernest W. Lampe. The fee for the course, 
which includes matriculation, registration charges, and tuition, is $200, 
and the course will be for a period of four weeks. The size of the class is 
limited to 25 persons. Inquiries may be directed to Office of the Dean, 
Cornell University Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York 21, 
N.Y. 

COURSE IN CYTOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS OF CANCER . . . This 
course consists of training in the technique and interpretation of smears 
prepared from various body fluids, with discussions and laboratory 
work. It is designed for qualified physicians and laboratory workers. 
The teaching is done by Dr. George N. Papanicolaou and associates. 
The fee for the course, including tuition, matriculation, and administra- 
tion charges, is $300. One course of three months will be given this year, 
beginning in March. The size of the classes is limited to 15 persons. In- 
quiries may be directed to Dr. John F. Seybolt, Cornell University Med- 
ical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York 21, N.Y. 

ANATOMICAL RESEARCH . . . Subject to special arrangement with 
the head of the department. 



BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 

JAMES M. NEILL, Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. 
EDWARD J. HEHRE, Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. 
JOHN Y. SUGG, Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology. 
EDNA SCHNAPER, Instructor in Bacteriology and Immunology. 

IRVING ABRAHAMS, Lecturer in Bacteriology and Immunology, 

The course is given in the third term of the first year and in the first 
term of the second year. Emphasis is placed upon the aspects of micro- 
biology and immunology that are pertinent to an understanding of the 
infectious diseases. 

FIRST YEAR . . . The laboratory work includes a survey of representa- 
tive morphological groups of pathogenic bacteria, a study of the 
microbial flora of the upper respiratory and lower intestinal tracts of 
healthy persons, and experiments on the mechanisms involved in 
antigen-antibody reactions. The lectures are directed toward the estab- 
lishment of general concepts, particularly the principles involved in 
microbial growth, the principles underlying active immunization, and 
the factors that enter into host-parasite relationships. 
Lectures and laboratory: 55 hours. 

SECOND YEAR ... In this term a more intensive study is made of the 
agents of specific infections, including fungi, spirochetes, ricketttsiae, 
and viruses, as well as bacteria. General concepts introduced in the first 
term are further developed by applying them to the specific diseases. 
Laboratory work with material from patients is included, not only to 
acquaint the student with the technical procedures, but to illustrate the 
application of fundamental principles to practical methods. The action 
of chemotherapeutic agents, especially those of microbial origin, are 
considered. 

Lectures, laboratory, and conference: 88 hours. 

ELECTIVE COURSES . . . The department will arrange a schedule of 
work for fourth year students who wish to devote their elective time to 
microbiology and immunology. 



53 



BIOCHEMISTRY 

VINCENT DU VIGNEAUD, Professor of Biochemistry. 
ROY W. BONSNES, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 
DONALD B. MELVILLE, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 
JULIAN R. RACHELE, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 
HELENA GILDER, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 
PETER G. CONDLIFFE, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 
DOROTHY S. GENGHOF, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 
CHARLOTTE RESSLER, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 
MARY ELIZABETH WRIGHT, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 
STERLING P. TAYLOR, Jr., Instructor in Biochemistry. 
ROBERT J. BROTHERTON, Assistant in Biochemistry. 
H. CLAIRE LAWLER, Assistant in Biochemistry. 
MARTHA LUDWIG, Assistant in Biochemistry. 
RUTH WOODS, Assistant in Biochemistry. 

The instruction in biochemistry is concentrated in the first year and 
is arranged upon the assumption that the student is aheady thoroughly 
grounded in the principles of chemistry and physics. The object is to 
impart that fundamental knowledge of biochemistry which is necessary 
to the comprehension of the bearings of chemistry upon medicine. 

The schedule during the first and second terms is devoted to an inten- 
sive course in general biochemistry by means of lectures, demonstra- 
tions, and conferences. During the third term the instruction is centered 
largely in the laboratory and the conference room where the knowledge 
gained in the first two terms is consolidated and amplified. Considerable 
emphasis is laid upon quantitative rather than qualitative laboratory 
procedures. Throughout these lectures the application of biochemistry 
to the study of disease and metabolic disturbances is stressed. Collateral 
reading in biochemical literature is encouraged. 

FIRST AND SECOND TERM . . . Lecture and conference course deal- 
ing w^ith the chemistry and intermediary metabolism of proteins, fats, 
carbohydrates, and purines; enzymes, digestion, intestinal putrefaction, 
and feces; the composition of the tissues, blood, milk, and urine; hor- 
mones and vitamins; the elements of physical chemistry as applied to 
biology and medicine, with emphasis on the fundamental properties of 
electrolytes and colloids. 

33 hours, first term. 

33 hours, second term. 

THIRD TERM . . . Laboratory course with lectures and conferences 
extending the work of the first two terms. 
154 hours, third term. 



54 



BIOCHEMISTRY 55 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

ADVANCED LABORATORY WORK OR RESEARCH ... By special 
arrangement. 

COURSES OPEN TO SPECIAL STUDENTS 
BIOCHEMISTRY. . .Fee, $25 a term. 

BIOCHEMICAL LITERATURE . . . Seminar course on the current 
literature in biochemistry, mainly lor graduate students but open to a 
limited number of specially qualified medical students. Hours to be ar- 
ranged. Professors du Vigneaud, Melville, and Rachele. 

BIOCHEMICAL PREPARATIONS ... A laboratory course dealing 
with the isolation, synthesis, and analysis of selected compounds of bi- 
ological importance. Hours, credits, and fees to be arranged. The Staff. 

RESEARCH IN BIOCHEMISTRY ... By arrangement with the head 
of the department. 



MEDICINE 

DAVID P. BARR, Professor of Medicine. 

LLOYD F. GRAVER, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

CLAUDE E. FORKNER, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

LOUIS HAUSMAN, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 

GEORGE M. LEWIS, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatology). 

ASA L. LINCOLN, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

PAUL REZNIKOFF, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

LEWIS D. STEVENSON, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 

HAROLD G. WOLFF, Professor of Medicine (Neurology). 

IRVING S. WRIGHT, Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

THOMAS P. ALMY, James Ewing Associate Professor of Neoplastic Diseases 

(Medicine). 
HORACE S. BALDWIN, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
ANTHONY C. CIPOLLARO, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

(Dermatology). 
HENRY S. DUNNING, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
RICHARD H. FREYBERG, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
WILLIAM J. GRACE, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
EDWIN T. HAUSER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
MILTON L. KRAMER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
MARY H. LOVELESS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Allergy). 
E. HUGH LUCKEY, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
WALSH McDERMOTT, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
ADE T. MILHORAT, Associate Professor of Medicine in Psychiatry. 
CARL MUSCHENHEIM, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
THEODORE W. OPPEL, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
HAROLD E. B. PARDEE, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
GEORGE G. READER, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
HENRY B. RICHARDSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
SIDNEY ROTHBARD, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
EPHRAIM SHORR, Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology). 
DONALD J. SIMONS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
HAROLD J. STEWART, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
HENRY J. TAGNON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
ALPHONSE E. TIMPANELLI, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
EDWARD TOLSTOI, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
RALPH TOMPSETT, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
ROBERT F. WATSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
BRUCE P. WEBSTER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
CHARLES H. WHEELER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
BYARD WILLIAMS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
ANDREW J. AKELAITIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 
SILVIO BAEZ, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

LOUIS BERLIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 
KEEVE BRODMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
JACOB BUCKSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
KATHARINE BUTLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
HENRY A. CARR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
ANNE C. CARTER, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
AARON D. CHAVES, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

56 



MEDICINE 57 

EUGENE J. COHEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

FRANK E. CORMIA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatology). 

PETER G. DENKER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 

HENRY D. DIAMOND, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

RALPH L. ENGLE, Jr., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

ALBERT J. ERDMANN, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

AARON FEDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

WILLIAM T. FOLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

CONSTANCE FRIESS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

SIDNEY M. GREENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

SUSAN J. HADLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

MILTON HELPERN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

LAWRENCE E. HINKLE, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

ELLIOT HOCHSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

EVELYN HOLT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

WILLIAM H. KAMMERER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

GEORGE L. KAUER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

B. H. KEAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Tropical Medicine). 

MARGARET KLUMPP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

J. VERNON KNIGHT, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

HERBERT KOTEEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

JOHN S. LaDUE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

MICHAEL LAKE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

RICHARD E. LEE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

CHARLES A. LeMAISTRE, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

LEON I. LEVINE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

ALLYN B. LEY, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

SOL S. LICHTMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

MACK LIPKIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

EDWARD J. LORENZE, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Physical 

Medicine). 
DANIEL S. LUKAS, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
KIRBY A. MARTIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
ABRAHAM MAZUR, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine. 
RICHARD R. McCORMACK, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
ROBERT H. MELCHIONNA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
RALPH S. OVERMAN, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine. 
MARY ANN PAYNE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
NORMAN PLUMMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
JOSEPH E. RALL, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
J. JAMES SMITH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
ISRAEL STEINBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
WILLIAM D. STUBENBORD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
ARTHUR M. SUTHERLAND, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
BEATRICE BERLE, Research Associate in Medicine. 
ERWIN SHEPPARD, Research Associate in Medicine. 
SEYMOUR ADVOCATE, Instructor in Medicine. 
ABRAHAM A. ANTOVILLE, Instructor in Medicine. 
SAM C. ATKINSON, Instructor in Medicine. 
CHARLES A. BAILEY, Instructor in Medicine. 
LLOYD T. BARNES, Instructor in Medicine. 
RUTH P. BERKELEY, Instructor in Medicine. 
SAMUEL H. BRETHWAITE, Instructor in Medicine. 
THOMAS E. BRITTINGHAM, II, Instructor in Medicine. 
VERONICA C. BROWN, Instructor in Medicine. 



58 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLE(.E 

GRAFTON E. BURKE, Instructor in Medicine. 
EDWARD A. BURKHARDT, Instructor in Medicine. 
JEFF DAVIS, Instructor in Medicine. 
MARION DAVIS, Instructor in xMedicine. 
MONROE T. DIAMOND, Instructor in Medicine. 
CAROLYN H. DIEHL, Instructor in Medicine. 
JOHN W. DOUGHERTY, Instructor in Medicine. 
MURRAY DWORETZKY, Instructor in Medicine. 
ROBERT E. ECKARDT, Instructor in Medicine. 
EMIL A. FALK, Instructor in Medicine. 
LAWRENCE FARMER, Instructor in Medicine. 
ROBERT B. FATH, Instructor in Medicine. 
LYMAN A. FULTON, Instructor in Medicine. 
JOHN M. GIBBONS, Instructor in Medicine. 
FRANCIS J. GILROY, Instructor in Medicine. 
OSCAR E. GOLDSTEIN, Instructor in Medicine. 
KEITH O. GUTHRIE, Jr., Instructor in Medicine. 
LOUIS A. HAUSER, Instructor in Medicine. 
DAVID S. HAYS, Instructor in Medicine. 
LEONARD L. HEIMOFF, Instructor in Medicine. 
HERMAN G. HELPERN, Instructor in Medicine. 
LAWRENCE B. HOBSON, Instructor in Medicine. 
EUGENE L. HORGER, Instructor in Medicine. 
ROBERT D. HUEBNER, Instructor in Medicine. 
LEIF Y. JACOBSEN, Instructor in Medicine. 
SCOTT JOHNSON, Instructor in Medicine. 
LAWRENCE I. KAPLAN, Instructor in Medicine. 
HENRY B. KIRKLAND, Instructor in Medicine. 
GERALD H. KLINGON, Instructor in Medicine. 
ROGER F. LAPHAM, Instructor in Medicine. 
HAROLD L. LEDER, Instructor in Medicine. 
DOROTHEA LEMCKE, Instructor in Medicine. 
MILTON D. LEVINE, Instructor in Medicine. 
JERROLD S. LIEBERMAN, Instructor in Medicine. 
ROBERT M. LINTZ, Instructor in Medicine. 
♦ROBERT O. LOEBEL, Instructor in Medicine. 
A. PARKS McCOMBS, Instructor in Medicine. 
ELLEN McDEVITT, Instructor in Medicine. 
RAYMOND E. MILLER, Instructor in Medicine. 
L. MARY MOENCH, Instructor in Medicine. 
WILLIS A. MURPHY, Instructor in Medicine. 
WARREN P. NESTLER, Instructor in Medicine. 
IRWIN NYDICK, Instructor in Medicine. 
MARJORIE B. PATTERSON, Instructor in Medicine. 
GEORGE E. PEABODY, Instructor in Medicine. 
FRANCIS S. PERRONE, Instructor in Medicine. 
R. A. REES PRITCHETT, Instructor in Medicine. 
CHARLES H. RESSLER, Instructor in Medicine. 
EDGAR A. RILEY, Instructor in Medicine. 
JACOB ROBBINS, Instructor in Medicine. 
WILLIAM C. ROBBINS, Instructor in Medicine. 
PETER ROGATZ, Instructor in Medicine. 
JULIUS L. ROGOFF, Instructor in Medicine. 
JOSEPH F. SABBATINO, Instructor in Medicine. 






*On leave of absence. 



MEDICINE 59 

THERESA SCANLAN, Instructor in Medicine. 

CHARLES SHEARD, Instructor in Medicine. 

EDWARD M. SHEPARD, Instructor in Medicine. 

EUGENE P. SIMON, Instructor in Medicine. 

THOMAS B. SPENCER, Instructor in Medicine. 

AARON D. SPIELMAN, Instructor in Medicine. 

SUCCJO SUH, Instructor in Medicine. 

KATHARINE W. SWIFT, Instructor in Medicine. 

DOUGLAS P. TORRE, Instructor in Medicine. 

MAURICE TULIN, Instructor in Medicine. 

J. RUSSELL TWISS, Instructor in Medicine. 

MARIAN TYNDALL, Instructor in Medicine. 

FREDERICK E. G. VALERGAKIS, Instructor in Medicine. 

FREDERICK C. WEBER, Jr., Instructor in Medicine. 

AARON O. WELLS, Instructor in Medicine. 

CHARLES A. WERNER, Instructor in Medicine. 

ERWIN A. WERNER, Instructor in Medicine. 

HAROLD N. WILLARD, Instructor in Medicine. 

FELIX WROBLEWSKI, Instructor in Medicine. 

SEYMOUR ZUCKER, Instructor in Medicine. 

JORGE ARAUJO, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

CARL A. BERNTSEN, Jr., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

RENE-HENRI BOURGAIN, Visiting Fellow in Medicine. 

DOUGLAS J. BUCHAN, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

PHILIPPE V. CARDON, Jr., Research Fellow in Medicine. 

ERNEST N. EHRENFELD, Visiting Fellow in Medicine. 

HELEN GOODELL, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

ELAINE D. HENLEY, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

BASIL S. HETZEL, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

MARY E. HOPPER, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

MELVIN HORWITH, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

TAYYAR KUSCU, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

CLAUDE MARIE LAPRADE, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

GEORGE R. LOVELL, Fellow in Medicine. 

ROBERT M. McCUNE, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

AMIL C. MOURA, Visiting Fellow in Medicine. 

LOUISE H. ORMOND, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

ADRIAN M. OSTFELD, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

HELIO PUCCI, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

CARLOS M. RAMIREZ, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

SELMA M. SHULTZ, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

HERMAN STEINBERG, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

CECIL SYMONS, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

HERTHA H. TAUSSKY, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

ALEXANDER TAYLOR, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

VINCENT A. TOSCANI, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

LILA A. WALLIS, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

MARY M. WILBER, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

MARK ZBOROWSKI, Research Fellow of Anthropology in Medicine. 

JEREMIAH A. BARONDESS, Assistant in Medicine. 

FRANK N. BILISOLY, III, Assistant in Medicine. 

WILLIAM N. CHRISTENSON, Assistant in Medicine. 

DENTON S. COX, Assistant in Medicine. 

JEAN H. ABEL CRAMER, Assistant in Medicine. 



60 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

^LARK EISENBUD. Assistant in Medicine. 
DuMONT F. ELMENDORF, Jr., Assistant in Medicine. 
ESTHER FINCHER, Assistant in Medicine. 
DAVID GOEBEL, Assistant in Medicine. 
WALDO GREENSPAN, Assistant in Medicine. 
LESTON L. HAVENS, Assistant in Medicine. 
ARNOLD V. HURTADO, Assistant in Medicine. 
THOMAS KILLIP, III, Assistant in Medicine. 
PETER W. KINSELLA, Assistant in Medicine. 
DAVID D. KLIEWER, Assistant in Medicine. 
ERNEST T. LIVINGSTONE, Assistant in Medicine. 
STANLEY R. McCAMPBELL, Assistant in Medicine. 
JAMES F. McGOVERN, Assistant in Medicine. 
DAVID W. MOLANDER, Assistant in Medicine. 
PATRICK MULROW, Assistant in Medicine. 
LUIGIA NORSA, Assistant in Medicine. 
AVRUM B. ORGANICK, Assistant in Medicine. 
BRENT M. PARKER, Assistant in Medicine. 
JAMES H. PERT, Assistant in Medicine. 
NELSON G. RICHARDS, Assistant in Medicine. 
DAVID M. ROSEMAN, Assistant in Medicine. 
KENNETH ROTH, Assistant in Medicine. 
GEORGE A. SIMPSON, Assistant in Medicine. 
PETER E. STOKES, Assistant in Medicine. 
LAWRENCE SWEENEY, Assistant in Medicine. 
JOHN E. ULTMANN, Assistant in Medicine. 
CARL WIERUM, Assistant in Medicine. 
EUGENE I. ZINS, Assistant in Medicine. 

WILLIAM G. C. MUNROE, Lectmer in Medicine (Tuberculosis). 
IGXAZ W. OLJENICK, Lecturer in Medicine (Neurology). 
ROBERT L. YEAGER, Lecturer in Medicine (Tuberculosis). 

Students begin their course in medicine in the second term of the 
second year with physical diagnosis under Dr. Stewart. They are in- 
troduced to this subject in the second term (two afternoons a week) by 
means of lectures, demonstrations, and practical work on normal 
subjects and patients. In the third term they spend two mornings a 
week with the patients either in the pavilions of the New York Hospital 
or on the wards of Bellevue, Memorial Hospital, or Lincoln Hospital. 

An introductory course in neurologic diagnostic methods is given 
imder the direction of Dr. Wolff in the third term of the second year. 
The work consists of demonstrations and intensive training in the dis- 
cipline of neurological examination. The students in groups of three 
are assigned to an instructor on the neurology service of Bellevue 
Hospital. This work coincides in time with the other training in phys- 
ical diagnosis. 

An introductory required course in clinical pathology is given in the 
third term of the second year, under the direction of Dr. Kellner. It 
consists of lectures and laboratory work. Among the topics discussed are 
the theory, practice, and application of methods for the examination of 



MEDICINE 61 

urine, blood, sputum, exudates, transudates, spinal fluid, gastric con- 
tents, and feces. The methods studied include chemical, morphological, 
serological, and animal inoculation methods which are of value as 
diagnostic procedures. Discussion of the clinical signification of find- 
ings is included. In addition, certain allergic phenomena are presented 
in lecture and demonstration, and their clinical relationship is dis- 
cussed. 

In each of the terms of the third year, one third of the class act as 
clinical clerks in medicine. Their time is divided equally between the 
New York Hospital under the supervision of Dr. Barr, Dr. Wolff, and 
Dr. Grace, and Bellevue Hospital under the direction of Dr. Luckey. 
The medical wards of the New York Hospital comprise five public 
pavilions totaling 126 beds. Those at Bellevue have approximately 100 
teaching beds. The service includes patients with diseases of the nervous 
system and of the skin. These are under the care of subdepartments 
which are organized for teaching and clinical research as well as the 
management of patients. They are, therefore, analogous to independent 
departments of dermatology and neurology as seen in other hospitals. 
An active pulmonary service is functioning in close cooperation with 
the surgical service and pediatric service. Beds on the fourth floor at 
the New York Hospital are used for the study and treatment of in- 
fectious diseases, including tuberculosis, the exanthemata, and syphilis. 
There is close cooperation with the department of psychiatry in the 
study of the neuroses and early manifestations of psychoses found in the 
wards and dispensary. 

The backbone of the student's training as a clinical clerk is believed 
to be his own experience with patients as amplified by reading and by 
contact with members of the hospital and teaching staff. He is given 
as much responsibility as is practical, nam.ely, the recording, in the 
hospital records, of his own histories and laboratory examinations. 
These, together with his physical examinations, are supervised by tutors, 
each of whom has responsibility for the supervision of a small group of 
students. Additional teaching consists of rounds with the visiting and 
house staff and more formal conferences once a week in which the 
clerks present cases for criticism and discussion. In these it is attempted 
to cover the more important fields of internal medicine. The work of 
the clerkships is supplemented by frequent clinical conferences which 
are held throughout the academic year. During the clinical clerkship the 
students receive further training in the evaluation of signs and symp- 
toms of disease of the nervous system. Two teaching visits a week at the 
New York Hospital are dedicated to neurological problems. This work 
supplements that of the second year by placing special emphasis upon 
etiology and therapeusis in diseases of the nervous system. 



62 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

The instruction of the senior students is conducted in the outpatient 
department with the intent of offering experience in general medicine, 
neurology, dermatology, and other medical specialties. Other depart- 
ments of the clinic such as physiotherapy and dietotherapy provide 
demonstrations. Practical work with patients is supplemented by 
seminars, demonstrations, and conferences and by presentation of 
subjects by the students. 

This course for seniors has been fused with the Medical Compre- 
hensive Care and Teaching Program, description of which will be 
found below. 

Clinical-pathological conferences organized by the department of 
pathology in conjunction with the clinical departments occur weekly 
throughout the year. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

CLINICAL CLERKSHIP AT BELLEVUE HOSPITAL ... Dr. E. 
Hugh Luckey and staff. For periods of one month. Maximum registra- 
tion, eight students. Work will include case assignments, ward rounds, 
frequent conferences with Dr. Luckey and members of his staff. 

ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM ... Dr. Ephraim Shorr 
and staff. For periods of two months. Maximum registration, two stu- 
dents. The work will consist of assignments to diabetic clinic, endocrine 
clinic, metabolism ward, and participation in applicable laboratory 
methods. 

INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND CHEMOTHERAPY ... Dr. Walsh 
McDermott and Dr. Ralph Tompsett. For periods of one or two months. 
Maximum registration, two students. Work will include assignments to 
infectious disease ward for the study of tuberculosis, participation in 
clinical and research projects under way in this subdepartment. 

NEUROLOGY ... Dr. Harold G. Wolff and staff. For periods of one 
month or two months. Maximum registration, three students. For the 
shorter period, the work will include participation in clinical activities, 
on the neurological outpatient department and ward. For the longer 
period, it will include also participation in investigative problems. 

CARDIOLOGY ... Dr. Harold J. Stewart and staff. For period of two 
months. Maximum registration, one student. The work will consist of 
participation in the cardiac clinic and wards, and the reading of electro- 
cardiograms, and assignments to research problems. 

HEMATOLOGY ... Dr. Paul Reznikoff and staff. For periods of one 
month or two months. Maximum registration, two students. The work 
will include participation in clinical activities in the outpatient depart- 
ment, ward, and hematology laboratory, together with possible assign- 
ment to investigate problems. 



MEDICINE 63 

NEUROANATOMY . . . This course given by Dr. Louis Hausman, 
will cover the development and anatomy of the nervous system and 
laboratory work on the reconstruction of the nervous system. Each stu- 
dent makes his own model. The anatomical background of the diseases 
of the nervous system is considered. Hours to be arranged with the 
instructor. 

FORENSIC MEDICINE ... 

(a) A series of 30 lectures given by Dr. Milton Helpern. The subject 
matter is illustrated with material derived from cases investigated by 
the office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the Borough of Manhattan. 

This course covers the following topics: the obligations and rights of 
physicians; relations of the physician to government agencies; functions 
of the office of medical examiner and of coroner; investigation and de- 
termination of the cause of sudden, suspicious, and violent deaths; the 
medicolegal necropsy; identification, signs of death, changes in the body 
after death; sudden natural death; relationship of disease and trauma; 
suicidal, accidental, and homicidal violent deaths; blunt force injuries, 
stab and bullet wounds, traumatic asphyxia, rape, abortion, infanticide; 
toxicology, especially the indications of poisoning and the selection of 
organs for chemical analysis; examination of blood stains, seminal 
stains, and hair, forensic application of blood grouping; occupational 
injuries and diseases. 

Tuesday afternoon, 5-6 p.m. 

(b) Practical course. An opportunity will be given to learn the 
circumstances surrounding and to observe at first hand the autopsy find- 
ings in numerous and varied cases of sudden, unexpected, suspicious, 
and violent deaths which are continuously being brought to the atten- 
tion of the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the Borough of 
Manhattan for investigation. 

Course to be given at the City Mortuary, 400 East 29th Street. 
Applicants should arrange their time with Dr. Helpern. 

OTHER ELECTIVES . . . 

Other special electives may be arranged through conference with the 
head of the department. 

MEDICAL COMPREHENSIVE CARE AND TEACHING 

PROGRAM 

The course in comprehensive medicine occupies the major attention 
of half of the senior class during each of the two semesters. It is designed 
as a synthesis of the many disciplines to which the medical student has 
been exposed and as such may be considered a laboratory course in 
patient management. 



64 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

This represents a new departure from the previous fourth year cur- 
riculum only in that reorganization of fourth year courses in medicine, 
pediatrics, preventive medicine, and psychiatry into a continuum of 
221/2 weeks' duration permits a longer and more adequate study of the 
problems in ambulatory medicine. 

Both the Medical and Pediatric Clinics have been designated as 
Comprehensive Care Clinics in which, through the use of consultants, 
the diagnosis and treatment of patients is attempted with minimal re- 
ferral to other clinics. In this exercise senior students play an important 
role. In addition, each student serves as a family physician to a selected 
family and sees adult members of the family in the General Medical 
Clinic and children in the General Pediatric Clinic by appointment. 
Under appropriate circumstances the student may make supervised 
house calls on members of his Comprehensive Care family to diagnose 
and treat illness. 

Teaching of preventive medicine is emphasized through the partic- 
ipation of Dr. Harold N. Willard, who represents the department of 
public health and preventive medicine in this program. 

Emotional aspects of disease are stressed through the participation 
of Dr. Francis Kane of the department of psychiatry in the care of 
Comprehensive Care patients. In addition, the student carries out the 
treatment of individual psychiatric patients in the Payne Whitney 
Psychiatric Clinic under the direction of Dr. Francis Hamilton. 

Dr. Eugene E. Cliffton of the department of surgery and Dr. Myron 
Buckman of the department of obstetrics and gynecology provide ap- 
propriate consultation services in their specialties to the Comprehen- 
sive Care Clinics. 

Part-time electives in medical and pediatric subspecialties, psychiatry, 
and preventive medicine are offered each student under the program 
in addition to the regular clinic work. 

Dr. George G. Reader supervises the program and is assisted by Dr. 
Lyman Fulton of the department of medicine and the staff of the 
medical outpatient department and by Dr. Florence Marshall of the 
department of pediatrics and the staff of the pediatric out-patient de- 
partment. 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 

R. GORDON DOUGLAS, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

JOSEPH F. ARTUSIO, Jr., Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

(Anesthesiology). 
ROY W. BONSNES, Associate Professor of Biochemistry in Obstetrics and 

Gynecology. 
EDWARD H. DENNEN, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and 

Gynecology. 
CARL T. JAVERT, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
HOWARD S. McCANDLISH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and 

Gynecology. 
CHARLES M. McLANE, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and 

Gynecology. 
JOSEPH N. NATHANSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and 

Gynecology. 
FRANK R. SMITH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
THOMAS L. BALL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
JUSTIN T. CALLAHAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and 

Gynecology. 
JOHN T. COLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
ROBERT L. CRAIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
WILLIAM F. FINN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
RALPH W. CAUSE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
RANDOLPH GEPFERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
WILLIAM P. GIVEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
OSCAR CLASSMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
ARTHUR V. GREELEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
DONALD G. JOHNSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
ELMER E. KRAMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
BENJAMIN E. MARBURY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology 

(Anesthesiology). 
CURTIS L. MENDELSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
NELSON B. SACKETT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
PERRY S. BOYNTON, Jr., Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
MYRON I. BUCHMAN, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
WILLIAM H. BURKE, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
DAVID B. CRAWFORD, Jr., Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
CLIFFORD H. FOX, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
ANN P. KENT, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
ROBERT LANDESMAN, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
VIRGINIA K. PIERCE, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
RICHARD A. RUSKIN, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
GEORGE SCHAEFER, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
ERWIN FLETCHER SMITH, Instructor in Obstetrics and Ciynecology. 
CHARLES T. SNYDER, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
EDWARD F. STANTON, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
WILLIAM J. SWEENEY, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
STANLEY J. BIRNBAUM, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
WILLIAM DAVIS, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
THOMAS F. DILLON, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

65 



66 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

SAMUEL L ETZ, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
HOLDEN K. FARRAR, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
JAMES GILMORE, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
KAY M. KRETH, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
JOHN R. LANGSTADT, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
WILLL\M D. McLARN, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
KENNETH G. NICKERSON, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
JOHN S. VAN MATER, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
ROBERT M. WAGNER, Assistant in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

The Lying-in Hospital, a divison of the New York Hospital, provides 
1 16 pavilion beds for teaching purposes in obstetrics and gynecology. In 
addition, the private service consists of a total of 91 beds. Students are 
given practical instruction in the outpatient department clinics of both 
obstetrics and gynecology and in the various special clinics operated for 
the more intensive study and care of patients with unusual problems. 
The students are given every opportimity to benefit from the clinical 
work as carried on and demonstrated on the wards and in the operating 
and delivery rooms. 

There are approximately 5,000 admissions to the obstetrical service 
and about 2,000 to the gynecological service each year. 

THIRD YEAR 

COURSE I. THE THEORY AND PRINCIPLES OF OBSTETRICS 
AND GYNECOLOGY . . . The content of this course consists of lectures 
and demonstrations covering the anatomy and physiology of the female 
reproductive system; the physiology and pathology of pregnancy, labor, 
and puerperium; and the etiology, pathology, and diagnosis of the dis- 
eases of the pelvic structures. 

The entire class meets for these sessions on Tuesdays and Saturdays 
12-1 p.m. throughout the year. Professors Douglas, Javert, Finn, John- 
son, McLane, and staff. Total hours, 66. 

COURSE 11. PRACTICAL INSTRUCTION . . . This work is given 
to one-sixth of the class for periods of one-half of a trimester (5 1/2 weeks) 
on Tuesdays and Thursdays 9-1 1 a.m. The course deals especially 
with abdominal palpation, pelvic examination, and manikin exercises. 
Professors Douglas, Dennen, Kramer, and staff. 

COURSE III. SEMINAR . . . Tuesdays and Thursdays 11-12 a.m. 
Professors Douglas, Given, Johnson, Kramer, and staff. 

COURSE IV. PRACTICAL DEMONSTRATION . . . This course com- 
prises instruction in obstetrical and gynecological bacteriology and path- 
ology. A considerable amount of this time is used in the study of pelvic 
neoplasms. Mondays 9-12 a.m. for one trimester. Professors Douglas, 
Javert, Finn, Ball, and staff. Total hours, 66 for Courses II, III, and IV. 



OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY 67 

FOURTH YEAR 

MAJOR PRACTICAL OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY . . . This 
course comprises practical work in obstetrics and gynecology and is the 
sequel to the theoretical instruction offered to the third year students. 
Each student will live in the Lying-in Hospital for a period of 7i/2 weeks 
during which time he will act as a clinical assistant to the obstetrical 
and gynecological departments, hospital wards, delivery and operating 
rooms, and clinics. He will be provided with sleeping accommodations 
but not with board. 

The practical work includes the prenatal care of many patients, at- 
tending them in labor and delivery as well as following them through- 
out the course of the puerperium. Facilities are also provided for the 
student to examine gynecological patients and to observe these patients 
through diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. 

Because of the nature of the service, night and week-end work is re- 
quired. Minimum hours allotted to the course, 264. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

PRACTICAL OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY ... A certain 
number of students will be accepted to serve as assistants in the clinic. 

Courses can be arranged in the chemical, bacteriological, and patho- 
logical laboratories for the study of specific research problems. The 
special clinics provide teaching facilities for clinical investigation in car- 
cinoma, endocrinology, heart disease. X-ray pelvimetry, infertility, and 
other allied sciences. The various rounds and staff conferences can be 
attended. 

Encouragement is given original work according to the departmental 
facilities and the student's capabilities and in general will be designed to 
meet the student's qualifications. 



PATHOLOGY 

JOHN G. KIDD, Professor of Pathology. 
JOHN M. PEARCE, Professor of Pathology. 
AARON KELLNER, Associate Professor of Pathology. 
LEWIS D. STEVENSON, Associate Professor of Pathology. 
JOHN T. ELLIS, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
CHARLES T. OLCOTT, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
GOETZ W. RICHTER, .\ssistant Professor of I'athology. 
F. STEPHEN VOGEL, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
CLAUDE IAN HOOD, Instructor in Pathology. 
ARTHUR S. CARLSON, Assistant in Pathology. 
ALBERT ERHLICH, Assistant in Pathology. 
ROBERT L. HIRSCH, Assistant in Pathology. 
NELSON D. HOLMQUIST, Assistant in Pathology. 
CHIEN-YUAN KAO, Assistant in Pathology. 
JOHN F. SEYBOLT, Assistant in Pathology. 
JEAN E. TODD, Assistant in Pathology. 

PAUL F. DE GARA, Lecturer in Pathology. 
JULES FREUND, Lecturer in Pathology. 
MILTON HELPERN, Lecturer in Pathology. 
THEODORE ROBERTSON, Lecturer in Pathology. 



GENERAL PATHOLOGY 

FACILITIES . . . The department of pathology occupies three floors 
of the central part of the College building, conveniently located above 
the library and in immediate contact with the Hospital, the autopsy 
room being in the connecting wing between College and Hospital. The 
teaching is largely concentrated on the third floor, where the autopsy 
room, demonstration room for pathological anatomy, anatomical mu- 
seimi, and classrooms are found. The fourth and fifth floors are chiefly 
unit laboratories for staff members and graduate students and for tech- 
nical preparation. In addition, animal quarters and facilities for experi- 
mental work are on the fifth, six, and seventh floors. 

The museum contains a carefully selected collection of specimens, 
representing most of the common and many of the more unusual patho- 
logical lesions. It is especially rich in lesions of bones and in tinnors. 
In addition to this mounted collection, there is available a very consider- 
able amount of constantly changing gross material for student study. 

The postmortem service of the New York Hospital affords abundant 
opportunity for study of pathological anatomy and its relation to clin- 
ical medicine. The systematic records of autopsies performed at the 
New York Hosj^ital have been j^reserved since 1851, and in recent years 
protocols and microscopic slides have been carefully indexed and filed. 

68 



PAIHOLOGY 69 

INSTRUCTION . . . Ihc course of instrudion is given in the second 
and third terms ol the second year. Gross and histological lesions are 
studied and their pathogenesis and correlation with disturbed function 
is considered. Lectures and classroom demonstrations are supplemented 
by studies at the autopsy table. The course begins with the degenera- 
tions, inflammation, and repair and proceeds with the various specific 
infections and tumors. The latter part of the comse is devoted to special 
systemic pathology including an introduction t(3 neuropathology. 

GENERAL AND SPECIAL PA THOLOGY . . . Required in the second 
and third terms of the second year. 

Professors Kidd, Pearce, Olcott, and staff. 275 hours. 

NEUROPATHOLOGY . . . The pathology of the nervous system is 
sttidied, and altered structure and finiction are correlated. Professor 
Stevenson. 33 hours. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGICAL CONEERENCES . . . These confer- 
ences are held in cooperation with the staffs of the clinical departments 
of the Hospital and Medical College each week throughout the year. 
Observations concerning the clinical course and diagnosis of diseases 
are correlated with changes found at autopsy. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

A student may undertake the investigation of some problem in 
pathology or may pursue advanced courses in any of several fields to 
be determined by consultation with the head of the departments. Re- 
search or elective courses will ordinarily require the entire time of the 
student for a period of one to three months, and may be continued into 
the summer. 



PEDIATRICS 

SAMUEL Z. LEVINE, Professor of Pediatrics. 

PHILIP M. STIMSON, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MAY G. WILSON, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

ARTHUR F. ANDERSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HENRY L. BARNETT, Associate Professor of Pediatrics. 

HAROLD W. K. DARGEON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HENRY D. LAUSON, Associate Professor of Physiology in Pediatrics. 

CARL H. SMITH, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HAROLD B. ADAMS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

LEONA BAUMGARTNER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

SAMUEL R. BERENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

CLEMENT B. P. COBB, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MARGARET DANN, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

PAUL F. DE GARA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics in Allergy. 

ROBERT O. Dubois, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HELENE ELIASBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

NATHAN EPSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

LEWIS M. FRAAD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

JOHN E. FRANKLIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MARTIN J. GLYNN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HENRY P. GOLDBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

JAMES Q. HARALAMBIE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HELEN HARRINGTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

FREDERICK C. HUNT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

EDMUND N. JOYNER, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

HEDWIG KOENIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

BARBARA M. KORSCH, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

NORMAN KRETCHMER, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Pediatrics. 

MILTON I. LEVINE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MARY E. MERCER, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in Psychiatry. 

CHARLES H. O'REGAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

LOUIS E. WEYMULLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

MARJORIE A. WHEATLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

ROSE LUBSCHEZ, Research Associate in Pediatrics. 

OTTO E. BILLO, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

WALTER T. CARPENTER, Jr., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MURRAY DAVIDSON, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MARY A. ENGLE, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MARVIN J. GERSH, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

HELEN N. HELPER, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

PHYLLIS H. KOTEEN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MARGARET M. KUGLER, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

FLORENCE N. MARSHALL, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MARION McILVEEN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

ROWLAND L. MINDLIN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

IRVING SCHULMAN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

BEATRICE S. SLATER, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

LOIS M. SMEDLEY, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

MARTHA L. SMITH, Instructor in Pediatrics. 

70 



PEDIATRICS 71 

MAXWELL STILLERMAN, Instructor in Pediatrics. 
DORIS S. WHITNEY, Instructor in Pediatrics. 
STANLEY S. ZIPSER, Instructor in Pediatrics. 
RICHARD E. ANDO, Fellow in Pediatrics. 
JOAN K. BARBER, Fellow in Pediatrics. 
LEONARD I. GORDON, Fellow in Pediatrics. 
MELVILLE G. MAGIDA, Fellow in Pediatrics. 
MADOKA SHIBUYA, Fellow in Pediatrics. 
GERTRUDE S. STERN, Fellow in Pediatrics. 
BARBARA S. ASHE, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
DAVID H. BAKER, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
MORRIS GOODMAN, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
WAN NGO LIM, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
WILLIAM G. M ANSON, Assistant in Pediatrics. 
THOMAS K. OLIVER, Jr., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
HELEN McNAMARA, Research Assistant in Pediatrics. 
ELIZABETH V. NEW, Research Assistant in Pediatrics. 

THIRD YEAR ... A clinical lecture once a week throughout the entire 
school year presents the subjects of normal growth and development in 
infants and children, principles of nutrition with their application to 
infant feeding, and patients illustrating the peculiarities of disease in 
early life. Students serve as clinical clerks in pediatrics for a period of 
five and one-half weeks on the pavilions of the New York Hospital. 
They are assigned new cases in rotation and gain experience in 
diagnosis and in the management of sick children requiring hospital 
residence. They are on duty in rotation at night and week ends. The 
work of the clinical clerkship includes attendance at cardiac clinics 
and at departmental conferences. Special rounds, seminars, and 
tutorial sessions are arranged for the benefit of the clerks. Instruction 
in contagious diseases is given at the Willard Parker Hospital. Total 
hours, 165. 

FOURTH YEAR . . . The clinical lectures are continued through part 
of the fourth year. They are closely integrated with the fourth year 
lectures in internal medicine. Students are assigned to the outpatient 
department in the mornings where they are given, under supervision, 
responsibility for the management of ambulatory pediatric patients. 
They take histories, make physical examinations, and prescribe treat- 
ment. A daily therapeutic conference supplements the clinical work. A 
series of seminars is held under the supervision of senior staff members. 
An effort is made to bring back to the outpatient department certain 
patients seen by the students in their third year for follow-up during 
their fourth year term in pediatrics. Emphasis is placed on the handling 
of psychosomatic problems and on measures which can be taken to 
promote proper growth and development. Students are given the op- 
portunity for longitudinal follow-up on individual patients so as to 
become familiar with normal growth and development of infants and 
children and the natural history of disease processes. Home visits and 



72 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

trips to inspect community resources are planned in relation to 
patient referrals to furnish students with understanding of home and 
commiuiity influences on the patient. Students are assigned to the well- 
baby clinic. Cooperation with the Department of Obstetrics makes pos- 
sible contacts with mothers during the ante partum and lying-in period. 
Total hours, 66. 



PHARMACOLOGY 

McKEEN CATTELL, Professor of Pharmacology. 
HARRY GOLD, Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. 
CHARLES J. KENSLER, Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 
WALTER F. RIKER, Jr., Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 
JANET TRAVELL, Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. 
FRANK C. FERGUSON, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. 
SOLOMON GARB, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. 
WALTER MODELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. 
JOSEPH F. REILLY, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology-. 
NATHANIEL T. KWIT, Instructor in Pharmacology. 
GEORGE G. READER, Instructor in Pharmacology (Therapeutics). 
SEYMOUR H. RINZLER, Instructor in Pharmacology. 
JAY ROBERTS, Research Fellow in Pharmacology. 

EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY . . . Laboratory work, demon- 
strations, conferences, and lectures given during the first term of tlie 
second year. The experiments are designed to ilkistrate a wide range 
of pharmacologic effects, the more important drugs being considered 
with reference to their action on different structures and their behavior 
in the organism. In conference, the laboratory data obtained by the 
class are assembled and discussed in relation to each other and to ex- 
periments reported in the literature. This course includes toxicology, 
121 hours. 

APPLIED PHARMACOLOGY . . . This course is given during the 
third trimester of the second year and is a continuation of the course in 
experimental pharmacology. It is intended to fill a gap between experi- 
mental pharmacology and the clinical use of drugs, and it deals with 
substances the pharmacological action of which can best be demon- 
strated on clinical material. This course includes practice in prescrip- 
tion writing. Emphasis is placed on evidence bearing directly on the 
human subject in health and diseases. 22 hours. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

CONFERENCES ON THERAPY . . . ^Veekly informal conferences on 
treatment arranged by the departments of pharmacology and medicine 
in collaboration with other departments. These serve as a forum for 
the exchange of views and evaluation of evidence concerning drugs and 
other meastues used in the treatment of disease, with open discussion 
by students, members of the College and Hospital staff, and visitors. 

RESEARCH . . . Arrangements are made for individuals or groups to 
participate in original investigations with a view to learning the meth- 
ods of pharmacological research. Special opportunities are afforded for 
work on enzyme systems, muscle-nerve, autonomic nervous system, and 
the cardiovascular system. 

73 



PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOPHYSICS 

ROBERT F. PITTS, Professor of Physiolog)'. 
HENRY D. LAUSON, Associate Professor of Physiology. 
ROGER L. GREIF, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 
RICHARD W. LAWTON, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 
JOHN MacLeod, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 
ROY C. SWAN, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 
LAWRENCE BERGER, Fellow in Physiology. 
PHILIP J. DORMAN, Fellow in Physiology. 
GEORGE R. FULLER, Fellow in Physiology. 
W. JAMES SULLIVAN, Fellow in Physiology. 
MARTHA J. BARRETT, Assistant in Physiology. 
ROBERT A. WOLBACH, Assistant in Physiology. 

FIRST YEAR . . . Lectures, conferences, laboratory experiments, and 
demonstrations. Physiology of muscle and nerve, gland secretion, diges- 
tion, the central nervous system, special senses, and endocrine organs. 
The laboratory work one full day a week includes experiments on these 
subjects. 110 hours. 

SECOND YEAR . . . Lectures, conferences, laboratory experiments, and 
demonstrations. Physiology of respiration, blood, heart, circulation, 
kidney, and metabolism. Laboratory exercises one full day a week. 121 
hours. 

The course of instruction in physiology is directed toward an under- 
standing of the principles involved in the functioning of the human 
body and the integration of its various systems. The lectures are sup- 
plemented by references to the current literature. The department is 
fortunate in having housed on the fourth floor of its building the Gra- 
ham Lusk Library of Physiology, a gift to the department from its late 
Professor Graham Lusk. This includes bound volumes of complete sets 
of the important physiological and biochemical literature, monographs, 
handbooks, and textbooks, and is being supplemented by some of the 
current journals and monographs. In addition to the College library, 
the facilities of this library are at the disposal of the students of medi- 
cine. 

The laboratory work includes a number of human experiments, 
emphasizes mammalian physiology, and is directed toward quantitative 
determinations. The laboratory experiments are chosen to illustrate 
fundamental principles in the respective fields of physiology and are 
correlated with lectures by means of conferences. The demonstrations 
include instruction in specialized techniques, experimental prepara- 
tions, and presentation of clinical cases. These are facilitated by the 
participation and cooperation of staff members of various departments 
in the Medical College and the New York Hospital. 

74 



PHYSIOLOGY & BIOPHYSICS 75 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

The department will arrange a schedule of work for fourth year 
students who wish to devote their elective time to physiology. 

COURSES OPEN TO SPECIAL STUDENTS 

1. PHYSIOLOGY. Fee, $100 for each term. 

2. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESEARCH. Subject to special arrangement 
with head of the department. 



PSYCHIATRY 



OSKAR DIETHELM, Professor of Psychiatry. 

PHYLLIS GREENACRE, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

AL\RVIN K. OPLER, Visiting Professor of Anthropology (Social Psychiatry). 

THO.\L\S A. C. RENNIE, Professor of Psychiatry (Social Psychiatry). 

LEO SROLE, Visiting Professor of Sociology (Social Psychiatry). 

CARL A. BINGER, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

J. LOUISE DESPERT, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

\VILLIAM H. DUNN, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

GEORGE W. HENRY, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

ADE T. MILHORAT, Associate Professor of Medicine in Psychiatry. 

JAMES H. WALL, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

LIVINGSTON WELCH, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

HAROLD G. WOLFF, Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

HELEN DANIELS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

ALAN W. ERASER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

FRANCIS J. HAMILTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

RICHARD L. HARRIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

GERALD R. JAMEISON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

SEYMOUR G. KLEBANOFF, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

RICHARD N. KOHL, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

NORVELLE C. LaMAR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

ALEXANDER H. LEIGHTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

MARY E. MERCER, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in Psychiatry. 

CURTIS T. PROUT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

FRED V. ROCKWELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

MARY J. SHERFEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

JOHN H. TRAVIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

ARTHUR WEIDER, Assistant Professor of Psychology (Social Psychiatry). 

EXIE E. WELSCH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. 

HARRY ALPERT, Research Associate in Psychiatry (Social Psychiatry). 

ERIC CLEVELAND, Research Associate in Psychiatry. 

ANNE MILLMAN, Research Associate of Biochemistry in Psychiatry. 

ERIC J. SIMON, Research Associate of Biochemistry in Psychiatry. 

EDWARD B. ALLEN, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

VALER BARBU, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

JULIAN I. BARISH, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

SARA A. BONNETT, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

ALBERT N. BROWNE-MAYERS, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

A. LOUISE BRUSH, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

ERIC T. CARLSON, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

HOWARD N. COOPER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

JOHN M. COTTON, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

ELEANOR CRISSEY, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

EDWARD V. EVARTS, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

G. RENEE FERGUSON, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

M. FREILE-FLEETWOOD, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

MARTIN J. GERSON, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

STEPHEN GOODYEAR, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

DONALD C. GREAVES, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

76 



PSYCHIATRY 77 

LAWRENCE J. HATTERER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

THOMAS F. HENLEY, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

JOHN H. HUGHES, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

FRANCIS D. KANE, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

WALTER W. KEMP, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

PRICE A. KIRKPATRICK, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

CHARLES A. KNEHR, Instructor in Psychology. 

HELEN P. LANGNER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

JOHN F. McGRATH, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

LEON L. RACKOW, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

PETER F. REGAN, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

ARNOLD A. SCHILLINGER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

MARIE-LOUISE SCHOELLY, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

DONALD J. SIMONS, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

LEONARD R. STRAUB, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

JOSEPH D. SULLIVAN, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

HANS SYZ, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

MORTON L. WADSWORTH, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

NATHANIEL WARNER, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

FREDERICK J. WERTZ, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

WALTER D. WOODWARD, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

HAROLD S. WRIGHT, Instructor in Psychiatry. 

IRWIN M. WEINSTOCK, Resarch Fellow of Biochemistry in Psychiatry. 

ALEXANDER CARLEN, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

JOHN CARR, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

REMO CERRULI, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

ARTURO FLORES, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

ALVIN H. GOFF, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

PETER T. JANULIS, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

DOROTHEA M. KERR, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

GUY LaROCHELLE, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

JAMES F. MASTERSON, Jr., Assistant in Psychiatry. 

ROBERT PECK, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

NATHAN STOCKHAMER, Assistant in Psychology. 

DAVID TIMRUD, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

JOSEPH S. WIELAWSKI, Assistant in Psychiatry. 

ELEANOR LEACOCK, Research Assistant in Psychiatry. 

The department of psychiatry offers instruction during each of the 
four years. The understanding of development of the normal personal- 
ity forms a necessary basis for future clinical training. A course in 
psychopathology in the second year orients the student in personality 
disorders and in the methods of their examination and study. In the 
third year, this preliminary training is utilized in the study of patients 
at the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic and on the pavilions of the 
New York Hospital. In the psychiatric outpatient department, during 
the fourth year, the student participates in the study and treatment of 
the diverse problems presenting themselves in general psychiatric prac- 
tice. The importance of personality problems in general medicine is 
taught in the pavilions of the New York Hospital and in the outpatient 
service of the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic. Clinics are planned to 



78 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

unify these many activities and to offer in addition a broad understand- 
ing of treatment and investigation. 

FIRST YEAR: PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT . . . Tliis course 
acquaints the student with the development and methods of study of the 
normal personality. Lectures, seminars, and selected films are utilized in 
presenting a dynamic orientation to the formation of personality from 
infancy through senescence. The significance of interpersonal relations 
is stressed, with particular emphasis on the patient-physician relation- 
ship. Psychological, physiological, and sociological factors are consid- 
ered. Total hours, 22. 

SECOND YEAR: PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND METHODS OF 
EXAMINATION . . . The outstanding psychopathological phenomena 
are demonstrated and their psychodynamics studied by the students on 
patients in the outpatient department of the Payne Whitney Psychiatric 
Clinic and at the Manhattan State Hospital. This course offers practical 
experience in interviewing and history taking and in the methods of 
psychiatric examination. Total hours, 33. 

THIRD YEAR: CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY . . . The principles of 
clinical diagnosis are presented, and a systematic review is given of 
the major reaction types and the dynamics of psychiatric disorders. In 
the pavilions of the New York Hospital, patients are studied with spec- 
ial emphasis on the importance of psychological factors and their role 
in disease and health. The intricacies of the doctor-patient relationship 
are emphasized. 

FOURTH YEAR: CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY ... In this course in the 
outpatient department of the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, the 
student carries out the treatment of individual patients. This course of- 
fers an opportunity to learn psychotherapy under close supervision and 
to understand the role of psychiatric social service and of psychological 
studies in the adjustment of these patients. Clinics with case presenta- 
tion, with emphasis on psychiatric treatment and review of literature, 
are given on Wednesday from 2 to 3 o'clock. Seminars deal with the 
psychopathology of childhood and the management of related difficul- 
ties. Total hours, 99. 

ELECTIVE WORK . . . Opportunities for elective work are provided 
in the out-patient department, in the laboratories of the Payne Whitney 
Psychiatric Clinic, and in the department of social psychiatry, with 
emphasis on community psychiatry and epidemiology of mental illness, 
and at the Westchester Division of the New York Hospital, White 
Plains, N.Y. 



PUBLIC HEALTH AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

WILSON G. SMILLIE, Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

EMERSON DAY, Associate Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

MORTON C. KAHN, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

LEONA BAUMGARTNER, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

SAMUEL R. BERENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Pre- 
ventive Medicine. 

BEATRICE B. BERLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

IRWIN D. J. BROSS, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 
(Vital Statistics). 

AARON D. CHAVES, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

HERBERT R. EDWARDS, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

FRANKLIN M. FOOTE, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medi- 
cine. 

ANN P. KENT, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

PHILIP OLLSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

WILLIS M. WEEDEN, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

HOMER C. WICK, Jr., Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medi- 
cine. 

HAROLD N. WILLARD, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. 

NINE CHOUCROUN, Research Associate in Public Health and Preventive Medi- 
cine. 

BERNARD D. DAVIS, Research Associate in Public Health and Preventive Medi- 
cine. 

HUGH R. DeHAVEN, Research Associate in Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

FRANCES H. BOGATKO, Instructor in Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

HERBERT W. COX, Instructor in Public Health and Preventive Medicine (Para- 
sitology), 

JAMES H. EWING, Instructor in Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

THOMAS G. RIGNEY, Instructor in Public Health and Preventive Medicine. 

WALTER D. ^V'OODWARD, Instructor in Public Health and Preventive xMedicine. 

SECOND YEAR: PARASITOLOGY . . . This course is assigned to the 
department of pubHc health and preventive medicine because the 
major interests of several members of the staff lie in the field of tropical 
medicine. Furthermore, the preventive aspects of diseases that are pro- 
duced by parasites are of paramount importance in the control of these 
infections. 

The course is given each Thursday afternoon during the first trimes- 
ter of the second year. The lectures are given from 2 to 3 and the labo- 
ratory work from 3 to 5 p.m. 

79 



80 CORNELL NfEDICAL COLLEGE 

The important parasites of man are considered: the mode of trans- 
mission of each parasite is studied, as well as the life cycle and inter- 
mediate hosts. Particular emphasis is placed on the clinical aspects of 
the various diseases that may be produced by the parasites. Prevention 
and control of human parasitic diseases are given proper consideration, 
and the therapy of these conditions is discussed carefully. 

An abundance of material is used for demonstration purposes. Many 
of the parasites are studied in living stages. Clinical cases of the various 
diseases under study are presented from the hospital wards, outpatient 
clinics, and elsewhere, whenever suitable material is available. Total 
hours, 33. 

SECOND YEAR: PUBLIC HEALTH . . . The course in public health 
begins in the second term of the second year. It is an introductory course 
in environmental sanitation, industrial hygiene, vital statistics, and the 
principles of public health. The students are assigned to this work every 
Monday afternoon for approximately eleven exercises. Laboratory as- 
signments and field exercises make up the major part of the work. The 
essential material covered in this term relates to community health pro- 
tection, including the control of water supplies, sewage disposal, and the 
sanitation of food. Housing is studied in relation to its various social 
and hygienic aspects, as well as air-borne infection and the problems of 
industrial hygiene. Four afternoons are devoted to vital statistics, in- 
cluding a consideration of the methods of statistical analysis and inter- 
pretation; three afternoons are devoted to health promotion of the 
industrial worker. Field visits are made, usually in small groups, to 
demonstrate industrial sanitation, housing, the New York City Health 
Department's diagnostic laboratory service, and other pertinent matters. 
Total hours, 33. 

THIRD YEAR: PREVENTIVE MEDICINE . . . Students are divided 
into small groups of about twelve each. These students are assigned to 
the department of preventive medicine every Friday all day for a five to 
six week period. The sections are subdivided into groups of about four 
students. These groups are then assigned to section work in the various 
activities of the Kips Bay-Yorkville Health Center. In addition, the stu- 
dents are given a full day's session with the Department of Workmen's 
Compensation and one half-day session at the Strang Cancer Prevention 
Clinic at Memorial Hospital. Each Friday at noon throughout the year 
the whole class assembles for a lecture or discussion. The subject matter 
of these exercises has, for the most part, been prepared by and is pre- 
sented by the students themselves. Total lectures and discussions, 33 
hours; total section work, 33 hours. 

FAMILY HEALTH ADVISERS ... A student may elect to serve as a 
"Family Health Adviser." Each of these students is assigned a family 
from the clientele of the New York Hospital. Under careful guidance. 



PI BMC HEALIH .^ PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 81 

over a period ot one year, he becomes the confidential adviser to the 
family on health matters. He ()l:)serves the economic and social status of 
the family, their housing and nutrition. As opj)ortunity offers, he aids 
the family in the titilization of the conmiunity resources that may be 
available to meet the family health needs. 

COMMUNITY STUDY ... If the student prefers, he may select a 
"Community Study" instead of an assignment as Family Health Adviser. 
This study consists of a report upon a community of his own choice, giv- 
ing in detail the facilities provided by the community for care of illness 
and protection of community health. This report includes not only the 
activities of the community health and welfare departments, but also 
the hospital facilities, medical, nursing, and dental personnel, and all 
other phases of community activities that aid in providing adequate 
medical care. 

FOURTH YEAR: In the fourth year, the teaching program for pre- 
ventive medicine is centered in the Comprehensive Care and Teaching 
Program. A member of the department of public health and preven- 
tive medicine acts as a consultant in the environmental and social 
aspects of the cases seen by the students and not only has a chance to 
review cases in seminar periods but also to work in the clinic along 
with the students as they are actually seeing patients. 

In addition to the considtations centered in individual cases, two 
elective periods of twelve weeks each are offered for specialized study 
in various fields of preventive medicine. In one of these sessions, lim- 
ited to six students, field trips are made to acquaint the student with 
actual programs for prepayment of medical care costs as they exist in 
New York City. In the other session, students are allowed to choose a 
field of interest in preventive medicine in which they wish an oppor- 
tunity to work over a period of twelve weeks. This work may be in 
such areas as industrial health clinics, school health, statistics, epidemi- 
ology, and cancer detection. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE . . . An elective course is offered to students 
in the fourth year. Not more than four students will be accepted for any 
one period. Students will be assigned to the Kips Bay-Yorkville District 
Health Center and will participate in the various clinical and research 
activities of the Center. 

MEDICAL PARASITOLOGY . . . This course is intended to supple- 
ment and extend the required work in this field. Diagnosis, life histories 
of parasites and their vectors, and control measures are considered -with 
special reference to tropical medicine. 

The department has been the recipient of the Marcelle Fleischmann 



82 



CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 



Memorial Fund for the study of immunologic and allergic phenomena 
in tropical diseases. Third or fourth year students may associate them- 
selves with one of the several research projects being carried out under 
this grant. 

UNIVERSITY OF HAVANA SUMMER FELLOWSHIPS ... Six stu- 
dents are selected each year for a two month fellowship in tropical 
medicine at the University of Havana. This course is conducted under 
a reciprocal arrangement whereby a young faculty member from 
Havana comes each year to Cornell for graduate study. 



RADIOLOGY 

JOHN A. EVANS, Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

HAROLD L. TEMPLE, Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

SYDNEY WEINTRAUB, Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

HARRY W. BURNETT, Associate Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

RALPH F. PHILLIPS, Associate Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

ROBERT S. SHERMAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

ELIZABETH F. FOCHT, Assistant Professor of Radiology (Physics). 

GEORGE JASPIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

JOHN L. McCLENAHAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

T. ARTHUR PEARSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

ISRAEL STEINBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology (Medicine). 

STEPHEN WHITE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. 

FLORENCE CHIEN-HWA CHU, Instructor in Radiology. 

HERBERT G. KANTOR, Instructor in Radiology. 

ALFRED W. KANY, Instructor in Radiology. 

JOHN K. O'NEILL, Instructor in Radiology. 

IRVING SCHWARTZ, Instructor in Radiology. 

HENRY N. SELBY, Instructor in Radiology. 

JOHN J. SNODGRASS, Instructor in Radiology. 

RUTH EVELYN SNYDER, Instructor in Radiology. 

KENT FORBES WESTLEY, Instructor in Radiology. 

WILLIAM DUBILIER, Jr., Assistant in Radiology. 

JAMES M. KEEGAN, Assistant in Radiology. 

NATHAN POKER, Assistant in Radiology. 

The teaching of radiology is conducted by didactic lectures, by section 
work with smaller groups in connection with clinical clerkships, and by 
presentation of the X-ray aspects of various cases at the regular confer- 
ences of the clinical departments. Moreover, elective courses given in the 
fourth year play an important part in supplementing these methods. A 
large film and lantern slide museum of cases carefully selected for their 
teaching value has been prepared. This is constantly added to from the 
abundant material passing through the department. Three floors of the 
L Building are assigned to X-ray work. In addition, equipment for spe- 
cial examinations is located in the Woman's Clinic, urology, psychiatry, 
and elsewhere in the Medical College and Hospital. 

During the first year, in collaboration with the department of anat- 
omy, anatomical structures are visualized by radiographic and roent- 
genoscopic methods. 

The didactic work consists of a series of eleven lectures to the entire 
second year class. These include the fundamental principles of radiation 
physics. X-ray diagnosis, and X-ray and radium therapy, with the aim 
of making the student aware at this stage of the various uses of X-rays. 
The indications and limitations are stressed. 

Section work is conducted in the third year, while the students are 

83 



84 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

serving as clinical clerks. The departments ot medicine, pediatrics, and 
surgery assign each group receiving instruction from them to the de- 
partment of radiology for regularly scheduled informal sessions. Specifi- 
cally related X-ray material is presented and correlated with the clinical 
and laboratory findings. These sessions total approximately thirty hours. 
Twenty lectures on roentgendiagnosis and radiation therapy are 
given to the fourth year class. 

ELECTIVES 

FOURTH YEAR . . . 

(1) X-ray Clinical ClerksJiips. A limited number of students are ac- 
cepted to observe, and assist, where possible, in the routine activities of 
the department. The routine includes film interpretations, fluoroscopy, 
therapeutic irradiation, and attendance at radiology conferences. Two 
conferences are held daily (L-611) at which time the more interesting 
diagnostic and therapeutic problems are discussed. One conference is 
held from 11:15 a.m. to 12: 15 p.m. The second session, from 1 p.m. to 2 
p.m., is limited to a review of the current examinations of the gastroin- 
testinal tract. 

(2) Technique of Fluoroscopy. Two hours. Limited to six students. 
Arrangements to be made through department head. 

(S) Gastrointestinal Fluoroscopy and Film Interpretation. One 
month. Limited to six students at any one time. During the period of 
the elective, the students will be permitted to perform fluoroscopic 
examinations under supervision. Arrangements are to be made through 
the department head. 



SURGERY 

FRANK GLENN, Professor of Surgery. 

ALEXANDER BRUNSCHWIG, Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
GUILFORD S. DUDLEY, Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
\VILLL\M F. MacFEE, Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
JOHN M. McLean, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology) 
ARTHUR PALMER, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology). 
JOHN M. PEARCE, Professor of Pathology in Surgery. 
BRONSON S. RAY, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). 
PRESTON A. WADE, Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
PHILIP D. WILSON, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
FRANK E. ADAIR, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
JOSEPH F. ARTUSIO, Jr., Associate Professor of Surgery (Anesthesiology). 
WILLIAM A. BARNES, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
JOHN M. BEAL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
GEORGE E. BINKLEY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
BRADLEY L. COLEY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
HERBERT CONWAY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Plastic Surgery). 
WILLIAM A. COOPER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
NELSON W. CORNELL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
JOHN W^ DRAPER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 
JOHN H. ECKEL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

GEORGE F. EGAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Dental Surgery). 
KRISTIAN G. HANSSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Physical Medi- 
cine). 
CRANSTON W. HOLMAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
ERNEST W. LAMPE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

FREDERICK L. LIEBOLT, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
X'lCTOR F. MARSHALL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 
HAYES E. MARTIN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

GERVAIS W. McAULIFFE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology). 
ALLISTER M. McLELLAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 
JAMES A. MOORE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology). 
,S. W. MOORE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
AV'ILLIAM F. NICKEL, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
GEORGE T. PACK, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
RUSSEL H. PATTERSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
RICHMOND STEPHENS, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
F. CAMPBELL THOMPSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
NORMAN L. TREVES, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
LEWIS C. WAGNER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
WILLET F. WHITMORE, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 
IRVIN BALENS\\ EIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
SFANLEY J. BEHRMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Dental Surgery). 
EUGENE E. CLIFFTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
JOHN R. COBB, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
ARTHUR D. CONSOLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). 
WILLIAM COOPER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
MICHAEL R. DEDDISH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
J.\MES A. DINGWALL, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

85 



86 



CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 



HOWARD S. DUNBAR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). 

EDWARD A. DUNLAP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 

JOHN T. ELLIS, Assistant Professor of Pathology in Surgery. 

HOLLON W. FARR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

JOSEPH H. FARROW, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

GEORGE A. FIEDLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 

EDGAR L. FRAZELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

HAROLD GENVERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN C. A. GERSTER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

HELENA GILDER, Assistant Professor of Surgery (Biochemistry). 

DAN M. GORDON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 

NORMAN L. HIGINBOTHAM, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

GUSTAVUS A. HUMPHREYS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 

D. REES JENSEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

JOSEPH T. KAUER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

SAMUEL F. KELLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology), 

BERNARD MAISEL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

BENJAMIN E. MARBURY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Anesthesiology). 

FRANK J. McGOWAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

FREDERICK C. McLELLAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 

GORDON P. McNEER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

LAURENCE MISCALL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

WARD D. O'SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

HERBERT PARSONS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). 

ROBERT L. PATTERSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 

J. LAWRENCE POOL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

PETER C. RIZZO, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 

JOHN G. SCHMIDT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

STUART S. SNYDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 

RICHARD B. STARK, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Plastic Surgery). 

JOHN E. SUTTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

FRANCIS P. TWINEM, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 

F. STEPHEN VOGEL, Assistant Professor of Pathology in Surgery. 

WILLIAM L. WATSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN P. WEST, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

DOYLE JOSLIN, Research Associate in Surgery (Plastic Surgery). 

JACOB APPLEBAUM, Instructor in Surgery. 

ARMAND ARSENAULT, Instructor in Surgery. 

JOSEPH C. AVELLONE, Instructor in Surgery. 

WILLIAM H. AYRES, Instructor in Surgery. 

ANNE M. BELCHER, Instructor in Surgery. 

FRANCIS A. BENEVENTI, Instructor in Surgery. 

LEMUEL BOWDEN, Instructor in Surgery. 

JOHN J. BOWE, Instructor in Surgery. 

RICHARD J. BRASFIELD, Instructor in Surgery. 

CHARLES N. BREED, Jr., Instructor in Surgery. 

WILLIAM G. CAHAN, Instructor in Surgery. 

THOMAS I. CAREY, Instructor in Surgery. 

DANIEL CATLIN, Instructor in Surgery. 

ROBERT A. CLARK, Instructor in Surgery. 

EDWARD C. COATS, Instructor in Surgery. 

ELIZABETH F. CONSTANTINE, Instructor in Surgery. 

ALEXANDER CONTE, Instructor in Surgery. 

CARLTON M. CORNELL, Instructor in Surgery. 

WILLIAM W. DANIEL, Instructor in Surgery. 



SURGERY 87 



ROBERT D. DEANS, Instructor in Surgery. 
J. EDWIN DREW, Instructor in Surgery. 
WADE DULEY, Instructor in Surgery. 
FRANK W. FARRELL, Instructor in Surgery. 
AUSTIN I. FINK, Instructor in Surgery. 
EDGAR P. FLEISCHMANN, Instructor in Surgery. 
MILTON GABEL, Instructor in Surgery. 
THOMAS J. GARRICK, Instructor in Surgery. 
JAMES L. GREEN, Instructor in Surgery. 
EUGENE J. GUENARD, Instructor in Surgery. 
CHARLES S. HARRISON, Instructor in Surgery. 
JAMES S. HARRISON, Instructor in Surgery. 
CHARLES C. HARROLD, Jr., Instructor in Surgery. 
DANIEL M. HAYES, Instructor in Surgery. 
JAMES M. HOLMAN, Instructor in Surgery. 
RUSSELL H. HOOKER, Instructor in Surgery. 
SUZANNE A. L. HOWE, Instructor in Surgery. 
FRANK J. HYNES, Instructor in Surgery. 
EDWARD B. C. KEEFER, Instructor in Surgery. 
JAMES T. KELLY, Instructor in Surgery. 
JOHN S. LEWIS, Instructor in Surgery. 
LUCILE LOSEKE, Instructor in Surgery. 
ROY D. McCLURE, Jr., Instructor in Surgery. 
CHARLES J. McPEAK, Instructor in Surgery. 
LEOPOLD MEHLER, Instructor in Surgery. 
THEODORE R. MILLER, Instructor in Surgery. 
OLIVER S. MOORE, Instructor in Surgery. 
GEORGE C. MUELLER, Instructor in Surgery. 
JUAN NEGRIN, Instructor in Surgery. 
EDWARD W. D. NORTON, Instructor in Surgery. 
JOHN B. OGILVIE, Instructor in Surgery. 
EARL A. O'NEILL, Instructor in Surgery. 
ALBERT J. PAQUIN, Instructor in Surgery. 
STUART Q. QUAN, Instructor in Surgery. 
ERIC C. RICHARDSON, Instructor in Surgery. 
GUY F. ROBBINS, Instructor in Surgery. 
ISABEL M. SCHARNAGEL, Instructor in Surgery. 
ANDREW SCHILDHAUS, Instructor in Surgery. 
MORRIS SCHNITTMAN, Instructor in Surgery. 
DAVID S. SPEER, Instructor in Surgery. 
ROBERT M. SPELLMAN, Instructor in Surgery. 
MAUS W. STEARNS, Jr., Instructor in Surgery. 
LEE R. STRAUB, Instructor in Surgery. 
JOHN F. STRUVE, Instructor in Surgery. 
H. RANDALL TOLLEFSEN, Instructor in Surgery. 
RICHARD C. TROUTMAN, Instructor in Surgery. 
GEORGE K. TWEDDEL, Jr., Instructor in Surgery. 
JEROME A. URBAN, Instructor in Surgery. 
FREDERICK VomSAAL, Instructor in Surgery. 
WILLIS M. WEEDEN, Instructor in Surgery. 
WILFRED D. WINGEBACH, Instructor in Surgery. 
WILLIAM I. WOLFF, Instructor in Surgery. 
ROBERT B. ZUFALL, Instructor in Surgery. 
CLAUDE CHOLETTE, Research Fellow in Surgery. 
HELEN PSARROU, Research Fellow in Surgery. 



88 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

WILLIAM R. ARMSTRONG, Assistant in Surgery. 
JULIUS J. BARER, Assistant in Surgery. 
DAVID BARR, Assistant in Surgery. 
JOHN W. BELLEVILLE, Assistant in Surgery. 
PAUL W. BRAUNSTEIN, Assistant in Surgery. 
DAVID S. BREEN, Assistant in Surgery. 
McHENRY S. BREWER, Assistant in Surgery. 
MITCHELL BRICE, Assistant in Surgery. 
NORMAN S. BUYS, Assistant in Surgery. 
ROBERT J. BYERS, Assistant in Surgery. 
PAUL CLAPP, Assistant in Surgery. 
WILLIAM COOPER, Assistant in Surgery. 
GEORGE N. CORNELL, Assistant in Surgery. 
WILLIAM GRAVER, Assistant in Surgery. 
PETER DINEEN, Assistant in Surgery. 
ROBERT L. DOW, Assistant in Surgery. 
CHARLES F. DYER, Assistant in Surgery. 
DuBOSE EGELSTON, Assistant in Surgery. 
RICHARD H. FLANDREAU, Assistant in Surgery. 
ALAN S. FREEMOND, Assistant in Surgery. 
ANITA H. GOULET, Assistant in Surgery. 
JAMES G. GRAY, Assistant in Surgery. 
ELLIS GRUBER, Assistant in Surgery. 
CHARLES M. HAMILTON, Assistant in Surgery. 
ALEXANDER HERSH, Assistant in Surgery. 
MALCOLM R. HILL, Assistant in Surgery. 
JACK HOLDEN, Assistant in Surgery. 
HENRY L. HOOD, Assistant in Surgery. 
ALBERT P. ISENHOUR, Assistant in Surgery. 
GEORGE JOHNSON, Jr., Assistant in Surgery. 
JEAN-CHARLES LAVOIE, Assistant in Surgery. 
JEROME LAWRENCE, Assistant in Surgery. 
HOWARD I. MARK, Assistant in Surgery. 
VALENTINO D. MAZZIA, Assistant in Surgery. 
THOMAS A. McGRAW, Assistant in Surgery. 
ROBERT J. McKENNA, Assistant in Surgery. 
ANN Z. MOYES, Assistant in Surgery. 
HAROLD C. MURPHREE, Assistant in Surgery. 
J. ALAN NICHOLS, Assistant in Surgery. 
EDWARD J. NYGREN, Assistant in Surgery. 
GEORGE R. PROUT, Jr., Assistant in Surgery. 
S. FRANK REDO, Assistant in Surgery. 
WILLEM W. ROOSEN, Assistant in Surgery. 
ROBERT I. SCHREIER, Assistant in Surgery. 
GEORGE C. SCRIMSHAW, Assistant in Surgery. 
ROBERT SPIER, Assistant in Surgery. 
BJORN THORBJARN ARSON, Assistant in Surgery. 
MARJORIE J. TOPKINS, Assistant in Surgery. 
HOWARD WAY, Assistant in Surgery. 
PHILIP D. WILSON, Jr., Assistant in Surgery. 



SURGERY 89 

GENERAL SURGERY 

SECOND YEAR . . . During the third term of the second year, tAvo 
hours a week will be devoted to history taking and examination of 
surgical patients. Total hours, 22. 

THIRD YEAR ... In the third year, students spend the entire time 
for one term in the outpatient department, both for general surgery 
and the surgical specialties. During this time they gain experience in 
history taking, physical examination, diagnostic work-up, and care of 
outpatients. Here, the students come in contact with patients exhibiting 
a wide variety of surgical conditions. 

During this term, for four mornings and four afternoon sessions in 
the diagnostic clinic of general surgery and also in the minor surgery 
clinic, students work on patients, make differential diagnoses, and 
formulate treatment in conference with a senior instructor. One lecture 
each week is devoted to fracture^;, and, in addition, each student spends 
one afternoon a week in the fracture clinic. During the week, three 
conferences with the entire group and a senior instructor are held, at 
which time selected topics are presented and discussed. A course in 
operative surgery on animals, designed to emphasize the fundamental 
principles of surgery, occupies one morning each week. 

A surgical clinic is held at the noon hour for students of the third 
year, throughout the year. A weekly clinic pathological conference is 
held, attended by both the third and fourth year students. Time, 330 
hours. 

FOURTH YEAR . . . During the time assigned to surgery in the fourth 
year, the students spend their entire time on the surgical pavilions as 
clinical clerks. This allows the opportunity of following each patient 
to the operating room and also of following specimens in surgical path- 
ology. In conjunction with this, a surgical symposium is held each week, 
at which time recent advances in surgery are discussed. A conference in 
surgical pathology is given weekly, in order to correlate all findings in 
regard to individual patients. One hour each day is devoted to a con- 
ference in general surgery or one of the specialties, including neuro- 
surgery, chest surgery, and plastic surgery. Both the third and fourth 
year classes attend the surgical grand rounds each week. Time, 264 
hours. 

OPHTHALMOLOGY . . . During the third term of the second year, 
the entire class receives instruction in microscopy of the eye including 
the pathology of such important diseases as uveitis, glaucoma, intra- 
ocular tumors, tuberculosis, injuries, and sympathetic ophthalmia. In- 
troduction to special diagnosis, techniques, and particularly to use of 
the ophthalmoscope is given at this time. Total hours, 22. 

In the term of the third year assigned to surgery, a series of lectures 



90 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

and clinical demonstrations is held one afternoon a week in which the 
commoner eye conditions encountered in the outpatient department 
and on the wards are covered. At the same time each student spends a 
limited period of time in the Ophthalmological Clinic. 

In the term of the fourth year assigned to surgery, the students are 
rotated in small groups through the outpatient department for ex- 
amination, diagnosis, and treatment of patients under supervision. This 
is supplemented by conferences and ward rounds. 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY . . . During each trimester in surgery of 
the third year, there is one lecture a week in orthopedic surgery which 
serves as an introduction to the clinical work on the orthopedic 
pavilion. Students work in the orthopedic outpatient clinic in small 
groups during the entire period of eleven weeks. 

In the fourth year a limited number of students serve as clinical 
clerks on the orthopedic pavilion. 

OTOLARYNGOLOGY ... In the surgical term of the third year, 
formal clinical lectures are given. The anatomy of the head is reviewed, 
and instruction in the examination of the ear, nose, and throat is 
given. Bronchoscopy and rhinoplasty are discussed. Students spend 
one afternoon each week in the otolaryngological outpatient depart- 
ment and have the opportunity to study cases on the pavilions as 
well. During this period, special topics are presented to the section by 
various members of the teaching staff. 

Opportunity is offered during the elective term of the fourth year 
to spend additional time on this subject. 

UROLOGY . . . The teaching of urology is carried out by means of 
lectures and clinics during the surgical term of the third year, at which 
time patients suffering from a wide variety of urological conditions are 
presented. The teaching is supplemented by experience in the urologi- 
cal wards and outpatient department. 

ELECTIVE COURSES . . . Clinical clerkships and elective work may 
be arranged in ophthalmology, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology, 
urology, and neurosurgery as well as in general surgery. 



special Students 



ALL STUDENTS not registered in Cornell University Graduate School 
and not registered for the ALD. degree are Special Students. These are 
Specl\l Students in the true sense of the word and must be especially 
qualified in preparation, ability, and objective in order to receive any 
consideration. They may or may not be graduate students in the sense 
of having completed work for a collegiate degree. They are admitted 
only by the consent of the head of the department and must be regis- 
tered in the Administration Office of the Medical College and must pay 
their fees at the Business Office before being admitted to lectures or 
laboratory periods. They are required to carry and show on demand of 
the authorities a permit of attendance. 

FEES 

Matriculation Fee $10 

Administration Fee $ 5 

Tuition fees vary depending upon the type of work taken. 

A breakage fee may be required. 



91 



Table of ILequired Hours 

First Second Third Fourth 

Year Year Year Year Total 

ANATOMY: 

Gross An at. of the Human Body 374 

Histology and Embryology 180 

Neuroanatomy 84 638 

BIOCHEMISTRY 220 220 

BACTERIOLOGY 55 88 143 

PHYSIOLOGY 110 121 231 

PATHOLOGY 308 308 

PHARMACOLOGY 143 143 

MEDICINE: 

Physical Diagnosis 121 

Clinical Pathology 77 

Neurology 33 

Specialties, Clerkship & OPD ... 297 264 

Lectures 22 33 847 

* Medical Comprehensive Care ... 310 

SURGERY: 

Ophthalmology 22 

Introductory Surgery 22 

Specialties, Clerkship & OPD ... 297 264 

Lectures 33 638 

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY: 

Practical Instruction 66 264 

Lectures 66 396 

PEDIATRICS: 

Practical Instruction 132 66 

Lectures 33 231 

PSYCHIATRY: 

psychobiology 22 

Psychiatry 33 33 66 

Lectures 33 187 

PUBLIC HEALTH: 

Parasitology 33 

Field and Section 22 33 

Lectures 11 33 132 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 18 18 

RADIOLOGY 11 20 31 

ELECTIVE HOURS (264) 

Totals 1045 1067 1074 1287 '4473 

*The Medical Comprehensive Care Program is a joint project of all clinical departments and the 
department of public health. In addition to the 310 hours not assigned to any one department, this 
program embraces the assigned fourth year curricular hours of medicine and pediatrics and part of 
those of psychiatry. 

( ) Elective time not included in totals. 

92 



TABLK OF REQIJIRKI) HOURS 

FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE 

1953-54 



93 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Histology 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


10-11 


11-12 


12-1 














1-2 


Biochemistry 


Histology 


Free 


Biochemistry 


Biochemistry 




2-3 
3-4 


Anatomy 


Histology 


Histology 


4-5 





Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Neuro- 
anatomy 


Histology 


Anatomy 


Neuro- 
anatomy 




Neuro- 

anatomyt 

Histology 


10-11 


Library 
Lectures* 


11-12 


12-1 












1-2 


Biochemistry 


Anatomy 




Biochemistry 


Biochemistry 




2-3 


Anatomy 


Free 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


3-4 


4-5 





Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Biochemistry 


Physiology 


Biochemistry 


Physiology 


Biochemistry 


Physiology 


10-11 




11-12 


Bacteriology 




12-1 


Psychobiol. 


Psychobiol. 


1-2 














2-3 


Bacteriology 


Physiology 


Free 


Bacteriology 


Biochemistry 




3-4 
4-5 







♦When scheduled. 
fFivc sessions histology and 6 neuroanatomy. 



94 



CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE 

1953-54 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Pharmacology 


Physiology 


Physiology 


Pharmacology 


Physiology 


Physiology 


10-11 


Bacteriology 


Pharmacology 


11-12 


Pharmacology 


12-1 






1-2 










Bacteriology 


2-3 


Bacteriology 


Physiology 


Free 


Parasitology 


Bacteriology 


3-4 


4-5 







i 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Pathology 


Pathology 


Pathology 


Pathology 


Pathology 


Pathology 


10-11 


11-12 


12-1 






1-2 






Free 








2-3 


Public 
Health 


Physical 
Diagnosis 


Physical 
Diagnosis 


Psychiatry 


3-4 


4-5 





Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


O 

M 




Pathology 


u 

M 


3. 2- 


M 


3.2l^ 


u 
■« be 




Pathology 


10-11 


11-12 










12-1 


Appl. Pharm. 


Appl. Pharm. 


Introductory 
Medicine 


Neurology 


Introductory 
Medicine 




1-2 














2-3 


Ophthalmol- 
ogy 


Clinical 
Pathology 


Free 


Introductory 
Surgery 


Clinical 
Pathology 




4-5 




Clin 
Pathc 


ical 
)logy 






Radiology 


Ophthalmol- 
ogy 



TABLE OF REQUIRED HOURS 

THIRD YEAR SCHEDULE 

1953-54 



95 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Group A: Medicine (1); Ob.-Gyn., Ped., Psych., Pb. HI. (2); Surgery (3). 
Group B: Surgery (1); Medicine (2); Ob.-Gyn., Ped., Psych., Pb. HI. (3). 
Group C: Ob.-Gyn., Ped., Psych., Pb.-Hl. (1); Surgery (2); Medicine (3). 


10-11 
11-12 


12-1 


Pediatrics 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Surgery 


Medicine 


Pb. HI. 


Ob-Gyn. 


1-2 














2-3 






Free 




3-4 


C.P.C. 


4-5 







DETAILED SCHEDULE - HALF TERM (5 1/2 WEEKS) 
PEDIATRICS 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Ob-Gyn. 




Pediatrics 




10-11 


11-12 


12-1 


Pediatrics 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Surgery 


Medicine 


Pb.-Hl. 


Ob.-Gyn. 


1-2 














2-3 


Pediatrics 


Pediatrics 


Free 


Pediatrics 


3-4 


4-5 


C.P.C. 







DETAILED SCHEDULE - HALF TERM (51/2 WEEKS) 
OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY, PSYCHIATRY, 
PUBLIC HEALTH, CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-10 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Contag. 
Diseases 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Pb. Hi. 


Free 


10-11 


11-12 


12-1 


Pediatrics 


Ob.-Gyn. 


Surgery 


Medicine 


Pb.-Hl. 


Ob.-Gyn. 


1-2 














2-3 




Psychiatry 


Free 


Psychiatry 


Pb. HI. 


3-4 


4-5 


C.P.C. 



96 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

FOURTH YEAR SCHEDULE 

1953-54 

TWO SEMESTERS (SIX DIVISIONS) 221/9 WEEKS EACH 
JUNE 23 to MAY 28 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9-1 


Isl Semester 2nd Semester 
Medical A Elec. (1); Ob.-Gyn. (2); Surg. (3). 
Section I Comprehensive { B Surg. (1); Elec. (2); Ob.-Gyn. (3). 
Care [ C Ob.-Gyn. (1); Surg. (2); Elec. (3). 

D Elec. (1); Ob.-Gyn. (2); Surg. (3). Medical 
Section II E Surg. (1); Elec. (2); Ob.-Gyn. (3). \ Conprehensive 
F Ob.-Gyn. (1); Surg. (2); Elec. (3). Care 


1-2 
2-3 
















• 


Psychiatry 








3-4 














4-5 


C.P.C. 




Special Lect. 









DETAILED SCHEDULE 
MEDICAL COMPREHENSIVE CARE 



Morning: 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


Group 








All Groups 






■U 


Pediatrics 


Medicine 


Pediatrics 


(9:00-10:00) 


Medicine 


All Groups 


Medicine 


Pediatrics 


Medicine 


Lecture 




Special 










(10:00-11:30) 




Conference 


"{g 


Seminar 


Sp'ty Elec. 


Seminar 


Medical 


Sp'ty Elec. 




Sp'ty Elec. 


Seminar 


Medicine S 


Grand Rounds 


Seminar 












(12:00-1:00) 














Radiology 






Afternoon: 














A 


f Seminar 
\ Pediatrics 


Sp'tv Elec. 


All Groups 


Seminar 


Sp'tv Elec. 




I 




(2:00-3:00) 








B 


Sp'ty Elec. 


Seminar 


Psychiatry 


Sp'ty Elec. 


f Semmar 
\ Pediatrics 










(3:00-4:00) 






II / C 

D 


Psychiatry 


Medicine 


Com. Care Conf 


Psychiatry 


Medicine 




Medicine 


Psychiatry 


(4:00-5:00) 


Medicine 


Psychiatry 
(4:00-5:00) 










Special Lecture 
















All Groups 














Pediatric 














Grand Rounds 





Groups I and II switch at the end of eleven weeks. 



*l 



Sloan-Kettering Division 
of Cornell University IS/ledical College 



BY AGREEMENT dated June 16, 1950, between Cornell University, 
Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, Memorial Center 
tor Cancer and Allied Diseases, and the Society of the New York Hos- 
pital, a graduate division of Cornell University Medical College was 
established to be known as the Sloan-Kettering Division of Cornell 
University Medical College. 

While each party to the above agreement continues under control 
and management of its respective Board of Trustees or Managers, there 
is established a Coordinating Board of eight members, of which two 
shall be chosen by each of the parties to this agreement. This Board will 
act as a clearing house of information and as a coordinator of those 
functions in which all of the parties to this agreement are interested and 
will make recommendations to the respective Boards of the parties to 
the agreement. 

The Coordinating Board of the Sloan-Kettering Division of Cornell 
University Medical College consists at present of the following mem- 
bers: 

Representatives of Memorial Center 
Reginald G. Coombe Mrs. Albeit D. Lasker 

Representatix'es of Sloan-Kettering Institute 
Frank A. Howard Lewis L. Strauss 

Representatives of Cornell University 
Arthur H. Dean, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees 
Deane ^V. Malott, President of the University 

Representatives of tlie Society of the New York Hospital 
John Hay \Vhitney Henry S. Sturgis 

FACULTY 

PROFESSORS 

OSCAR BODANSKY, Professor of Biocliemistry. Attending Clinical Biochemist, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1921, Ph.D. 1925, Columbia; M.D. 1938, University 
of Chicago. [1946; 1951]) 

GEORGE B. BROWN, Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1934, Illinois Weslevan; 
M.S. 1936, Ph.D. 1938, University of Illinois. [1939; 1951]) 

JOSEPH H. BURCHEXAL, Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician, Memorial 
Hospital. (M.D. 1937, University of Pennsylvania. [1949; 1952]) 

THOMAS F. GALLAGHER, Professor of Biochemistry. (A.B. 1927, Fordham Uni- 
versity; Ph.D. 1931, University of Chicago. [1951]) 



98 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

JAMES J. NICKSON, Professor of Radiology. Attending Radiation Therapist, Memo- 
rial Hospital. (B.S. 1936, University of Washington; M.D. 1940, Johns Hopkins. 
[1949; 1951]) 

HENRY T. RANDALL, Professor of Surgery. Clinical Director and Chief of Surgical 
Services, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1937, Princeton; ALD. 1941, Med.Sc.D. 1950, 
Columbia. [1950; 1951]) 

RULON W. RAWSON, Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician, Memorial Hos- 
pital. (M.B. 1937, M.D. 1938, Northwestern. [1948; 1951]) 

CORNELIUS P. RHOADS, Professor of Pathology. Director, Memorial Center for 
Cancer and Allied Diseases. (A.B. 1920, Bowdoin; M.D. 1924, Harvard. [1941]) 

FRED W. STEWART, Professor of Pathology. Attending Pathologist, Memorial 
Hospital; Attending Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1916, Ph.D. 1919, Cor- 
nell; M.D. 1924, Harvard. [1928; 1949]) 

C. CHESTER STOCK, Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1932, Rose Polytechnic Insti- 
tute; Ph.D. 1937, Johns Hopkins University; M.S. 1941, New York University. 
[1951]) 

GEORGE \V. WOOLLEY, Professor of Biology. (B.S. 1930, Iowa State College; M.S. 
1931, Ph.D. 1935, University of Wisconsin. [1951]) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

ARTHUR C. ALLEN, Associate Professor of Pathology. Associate Attending Patholo- 
gist, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1931, M.D. 1936, University of California. [1951]) 

HAROLD BEYER, Associate Professor of Biophysics. (A.B. 1934, Ph.D. 1943, Colum- 
bia University. [1951]) 

JOHN J. BIESELE, Associate Professor of Biology. (A.B. 1939, Ph.D. 1942, Univer- 
sity of Texas. [1950; 1952]) 

FRANK W. FOOTE, Jr., Associate Professor of Pathology. Attending Pathologist, 
Memorial Hospital; Associate Attending Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1931, M.D. 1935, University of Virginia. [1949]) 

DAVID A. KARNOFSKY, Associate Professor of Medicine. Associate Attending 
Physician, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1934, University of California; A. M. 1936, 
M.D. 1940, Stanford. [1949; 1952]) 

JOHN S. LAUGHLIN, Associate Professor of Biophysics. Attending Physicist, Memo- 
rial Hospital. (A.B. 1940, Willamette University; M.S. 1942, Haverford College; 
Ph.D. 1947, University of Illinois. [1952]) 

ALICE E. MOORE, Associate Professor of Biology. (A.B. 1930, A.M. 1935, Ohio State 
University; M.D. 1942, New York University College of Medicine. [1951]) 

OLOF H. PEARSON, Associate Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Physician, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1934, M.D. 1939, Harvard University. [1949; 1952]) 

MARY L. PETERMANN, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. (A.B. 1929, Smith Col- 
lege; Ph.D. 1939, University of Wisconsin. [1951]) 

FREDERICK S. PHILIPS, Associate Professor of Pharmacology. (A.B. 1936, Colum- 
bia; Ph.D. 1940, Rochester. [1948; 1951]) 

DAVID PRESSMAN, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1937, California 
Institute of Technology; M.A. 1938, University of California at Los Angeles; Ph.D. 
1940, California Institute of Technology. [1951]) 

HOWARD L. RICHARDSON, Associate Professor of Pathology. Assistant Attending 
Pathologist, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1936, College of Puget Sound; M.A. 1940; 
M.D. 1940, University of Oregon Medical School. [1952]) 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 
M. EARL BALIS, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (A.B. 1943, Temple Unversity; 

M.S. 1947, Ph.D. 1949, University of Pennsylvania. [1952; 1953]) 
RALPH K. BARCLAY, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1938, University of 

Illinois; Ph.D. 1949, Iowa State College. [1953]) 






SLOAN KEllERING DIVISION 99 

AARON BENDICH, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1989, College of the 

City of New York; Ph.D. 1946, Columbia University. [1952]) 
LIEBE F. CAVALIERI, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1943, M.S. 1944, 

Ph.D. 1945, University of Pennsylvania. [1952]) 
DONALD A. CLARKE, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. (B.S. 19.37, IMiiladelphia 

College of Pharmacy and Science; M.A. 1946, Ph.D. 1950, Cornell. [1952; 1953]) 
PATRICK FITZGERALD, Assistant Professor of Pathology. Assistant Attending 

Pathologist, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1936, University of Massachusetts; M.D. 1940, 

Tufts College Medical School. [1952]) 
DAVID K. FUKUSHIMA, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (A.B. 1939, Whittier 

College; A.M. 1943, University of California at Los Angeles; Ph.D. 1946, University 

of Rochester. [1952]) 
LEON D. HELLMAN, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Clinical Assistant in Medi- 
cine, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1941, Columba University; M.D. 1945, Long Island 

College of Medicine; Med.Sc.D. 1951, Columbia University. [1952]) 
RAYMOND W. HOUDE, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Phy- 
sician, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1940, New York University; M.D. 1943, New York 

University College of Medicine. [1950; 1953]) 
HENRY J. KOCH, Jr., Assistant Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Phy 

sician. Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1939, Holy Cross; M.D. 1943, Harvard University 

[1950; 1953]) 
THEODORE H. KRITCHEVSKY, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1940 

University of Chicago; M.S. 1943, Illinois Institute of Technology; Ph.D. 1949 

University of Chicago. [1952; 1953]) 
ROBERT C. MELLORS, Assistant Professor of Biology. Fellow in Pathology, Memo 

rial Hospital. (A.B. 1937, A.M. 1938, Ph.D. 1940, Western Reserve University; M.D 

1944, Johns Hopkins University. [1952]) 
WILLIAM L. MONEY, Assistant Professor of Biology. (A.B. 1943, Brown University 

Ph.D. 1947, Harvard University. [1949; 1951]) 
H. CHRISTINE REILLY, Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. (B.S. 1941, New Jersey 

College for Women; Ph.D. 1946, Rutgers University. [1952]) 
PAUL M. ROLL, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1936, University of Santa 

Clara; M.A. 1942, Ph.D. 1947, Stanford University. [1952]) 
CHESTER M. SOUTHAM, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Phy- 
sician, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1941, M.S. 1943, University of Idaho; M.D. 1947, 

Columbia University. [1951; 1952]) 
SOPHIE SPITZ, Assistant Professor of PatJiology. Assistant Attending Pathologist, 

Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1929, M.D. 1932, Vanderbilt University. [1952]) 
HELENE W. TOOLAN, Assistant Professor of Pathology. (B.S. 1929, University of 

Chicago; Ph.D. 1946, Cornell University Medical College. [1952]) 
JOHN M. WALKER, Assistant Professor of Surgery. Assistant Attending Surgeon, 

Assistant Clinical Director, Memorial Hospital. (Ph.D. 1931, Yale University; M.D. 

1936, Columbia University. [1953]) 
CHARLES D. WEST, Assistant Professor of Medicitie. Clinical Assistant in Medicine, 

Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1941, M.D. 1944, Ph.D. 1950, University of Utah. [1952; 

1953]) 
HELEN Q. WOODARD, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. Associate Attending 

Biochemist, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1920, Stetson University; Ph.D. 1925, Colum- 
bia University. [1952]) 

EDUCATIONAL l^LAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The facilities of the Sloan-Kettering Graduate Division consist of a 
thirteen story laboratory unit (Sloan-Kettering Institute) in direct con- 



100 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

nection with two hospitals — Memorial Hospital, a voluntary institu- 
tion oi 280 beds, and the James Ewing Hospital, a unit of the New York 
City hospital system with 270 beds. The Strang Clinic, another building 
in the iniit, houses the work in preventive medicine in cancer. 

The type oi training offered in this Division of the Medical College 
is primarily for candidates who are working toward an advanced degree. 
The plan of organization for teaching and research affords ample op- 
portunities for direct participation in investigative work on cancer and 
allied diseases in recognized divisions of the physical and biological 
sciences but not in any of the clinical fields such as medicine, pediatrics, 
and surgery. In addition to the conventional disciplines of biochemistry, 
biophysics, and pathology, a new department has been organized under 
the heading of "Biology and Growth." This department presents lec- 
tures and laboratory work in the field of normal and neoplastic growth, 
which do not fall in the usual curricular divisions. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

OSCAR BODANSKY, Professor of Biochemistry. 

GEORGE W. BROWN, Professor of Biochemistry. 

THOMAS F. GALLAGHER, Professor of Biochemistry. 

MARY L. PETERMANN, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 

DAVID PRESSMAN, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. 

M. EARL BALIS, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

RALPH K. BARCLAY, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

AARON BENDICH, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

LIEBE F. CAVALIERI, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

DAVID K. FUKUSHIMA, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

THEODOUE H. KRITCHEVSKY, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

PAUL M. ROLL, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

HELEN Q. WOODARD, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

C. T. BEER, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

H. LEON BRADLOW, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

A. D. KEMP, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

LEONHARD KORNGOLD, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

NORMA S. LEEDS, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

ROBERT S. ROSENFELD, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

MAX SCHLAMOWITZ, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

MALCOLM SIEGEL, Research Associate in Biochemistry. 

GILBERT GOLDSTEIN, Research Fellow in Biochemistry. 

ATTALLAH KAPPAS, Research Fellow in Biochemistry. 

IVAN I. SALAMON, Research Fellow in Biochemistry. 

MORTON K. SCHWARTZ, Research Fellow in Biochemistry. 

ALBERI H. SOLO WAY, Research Fellow in Biochemistry. 

HERBERT WEINFELD, Research Fellow in Biochemistry. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Special work may be undertaken in the fields of electrolyte metabo- 
lism, enzymology, immunochemistry, protein and nucleoprotein chem 
istry and metabolism, and the chemistry and metabolism of steroids by 
arrangement with the appropriate member of the department. 



SLOAN-KEl 1ER1N(; DIVISION 101 

BIOLOGY AND GROWTH 

CORNELIUS P. RHOADS, Professor of Pathology. 
C. CHESTER STOCK, Professor of Biochemistry. 
GEORGE W. WOOLLEY, Professor of Biology. 
JOHN J. BIESELE, Associate Professor of Biology. 
ALICE E. MOORE, Associate Professor of Biology. 
EREDERICK S. PHILIPS, Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 
DONALD A. CLARKE, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. 
ROBERT MELLORS, Assistant Professor of Biology. 
WILLIAM L. MONEY, Assistant Professor of Biology. 
H. CHRISTINE REILLY, Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 
HELENE W. TOOLAN, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
CHARLOTTE FRIEND, Research Associate in Bacteriology. 
ROBERT GUTHRIE, Research Associate in Bacteriology. 
DORRIS J. HUTCHISON, Research Associate in Bacteriology. 
A. R. T. DENUES, Instructor in Biology. 
MARGARET HARLAND, Instructor in Anatomy. 
AUDREY FJELDE, Research Fellow in Bacteriology. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Investigative facilities are available for studies in pharmacology, mi- 
crobiology, endocrinology, genetics, and virology as related to the ini- 
tiation and growth of various types of cancer. Training will be given in 
the special procedures used in experimental cancer chemotherapy. Ar- 
rangements for the desired type of work may be made with the appro- 
priate member of the department. 

BIOPHYSICS 

HAROLD BEYER, Associate Professor of Biophysics. 
JOHN S. LAUGHLIN, Associate Professor of Biophysics. 
THEODORE HALL, Instructor in Biophysics. 
JACQUES OVADIA, Instructor in Biophysics. 
MONES BERMAN, Research Fellow in Biophysics. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Facilities are available for training in radiologic physics (including 
high energy phenomena), radiobiology, tracer work (stable and radio- 
active), radioautography, soft X-ray absorption, electronics, and theory 
and practice of radiation detection. Arrangements may be made with 
the department head. 

MEDICINE 

RULON W. RAWSON, Professor of Medicine. 
JOSEPH H. BURCHENAL, Professor of Medicine. 
DAVID A. KARNOFSKY, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
OLOF H. PEARSON, Associate Professor of Medicine. 
LEON D. HELLMAN, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
RAYMOND W. HOUDE, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
HENRY J. KOCH, Jr., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 



J()2 coRM-.i.L mi:i)k;al college 

CHESl ER M. SOr IHAM, Assistant Professor of ^^cdicinc. 
CIHARLES D. WEST, Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
ROSE-RUTH ELLISON, Research Associate in Medicine. 
M. LOLS MURPHY, Research Associate in Medicine. 
W. P. LAIRD MYERS, Research Associate in Medicine. 
KATHLEEN E. ROBERTS, Research Associate in Medicine. 
MARTIN SOxNENBERG, Research Associate in Medicine. 
MARGUERILE SYKES, Research Associate in Medicine. 
GEORGE C. ESCHER, Instructor in Medicine. 
JAMES W. POPPELL, Research Fellow in Medicine. 
DOROTHY AVEBER SVED, Research Fellow in Medicine. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Elective courses lasting t^so to four months are available for tourth 
year students to work in the sections of clinical investigation. The fol- 
lowing courses are offered by the Division of Clinical Investigation: 

1. Hematology. A maximum of two students can be accepted. 

2. Isotopic technics in medicine. A maximum of two students can be 
accepted. 

3. Metabolic methods in clinical medicine. One student can be ac- 
cepted. 

4. Thyroid physiology. A maximum of two students can be accepted. 

5. A series of lectures on the natural history of various types of neo- 
plastic disease and on the medical management of cancer presented by 
the medical neoplasia and chemotherapy services. 

A maximum of four students can be accepted for training in the tech- 
nics of evaluating chemotherapeutic agents in cancer, through the care 
of the patients on the wards and in the outpatient department, and by 
participation in the weekly service conferences. 

PATHOLOGY 

FRED W. STEWART, Professor of Pathology. 
ARTHUR C. ALLEN, Associate Professor of Pathology. 
FRANK \V. FOOTE, Jr., Associate Professor of Pathology. 
HO^VARD RICHARDSON, Associate Professor of Pathology. 
PATRICK FITZGERALD, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
SOPHIE SPITZ, Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
STEPHEN S. STERNBERG, Research Associate in Pathology. 
DOUGLAS SUxXDERLAND, Research Associate in Pathology. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Fourth year medical students are accepted for elective work in tumor 
pathology for periods of one month or longer at any time through spe- 
cial arrangement. Such students are assigned to a graduate Fellow in 
pathology who will serve as tutor. They shall observe and assist at 
autopsies and examination of gross surgical specimens, and microscopic 
diagnosis; they shall attend weekly clinicopathologic conferences and 
departmental conferences. Formal lectures are not offered. A micro- 
scope is required. 



SLOy\N KETTERING DIVISION 103 

RADIOLOGY 

JAMES J. NICKSON, Professor of Radiology. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

1. Lectures in Radiation Therapy. Thursday afternoons, 5-6, Jan- 
uary through April. 

2. Lectures in Radiological Physics. Wednesday afternoons, 5-6, Jan- 
uary through April. 

3. Lectures in Radiobiology. Monday afternoons, 5:30-6:30, January 
through April. 

In addition, elective students will be taken for a period of three 
months for half-time work in laboratory investigations of the effect of 
ionizing radiations on biological material. This course will be arranged 
after interview only. 

SURGERY 

HENRY T. RANDALL, Professor of Surgery. 
JOHN M. AVALKER, Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Opportunities are available for clinical investigation in problems of 
metabolism, particularly in water and electrolyte metabolism and renal 
function as related to surgical problems. There are special facilities for 
animal studies in experimental surgery and surgical physiology j^ertain- 
ing to problems of major surgery in the cancer field. Arrangements may 
be made with the department head. 



Internship Appointments, 
Class of 1953 



DOCTORS OF MEDICINE, JUNE 10, 1953 



Charles Peter Albright 

John Symington Aldridge 

Kenneth Collett Archibald 

Frank Myrick Ash 

Bennett Barton 

Barbara Bates 

Stephen Lamar Bennett 

Richard Harrod Blank 

David Myron Bloom 

David Albert Blumenstock 

John Benjamin Branche 

Carl Hannibal Brennan, Jr. 

Robert Woods Brown 

Frederick William Campbell 

David Ignatius Canavan 

Arthur Chandler, Jr. 

George Tanner Conger 

Elizabeth Vasiliki Despina Coryllos 

Earnest Markell Curtis, Jr. 

Richard La Vern Dexter 

John Phillips Dorst 

Robert Harrison Edwards 

Harold J. Ellner 

Lawrence Mance Ervin 

Ames Lawrence Filippone, Jr 

Marvin Irving Fox 

Julia Louise Freitag 

Catherine Bradford Friedrich 



Edward J. Meyer Memorial Hospital, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Syracuse Medical Center, Syracuse, N.Y. 

St. Luke's Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, Hanover, N.H. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, N.Y. 

Meadowbrook Hospital, Hempstead, N.Y. 

Baltimore City Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Univ. of Chicago Clinics, Chicago, 111. 

Genesee Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

University Hospitals, Madison, Wis. 

State University of Iowa Hospitals, Iowa City, Iowa 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N. Y. 

State University of Iowa Hospitals, Iowa City, Iowa 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Michael Reese Hospital, Chicago, 111. 

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Cleveland City Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio 

Minneapolis General Hospital, Minneapolis, Minn. 



George Ripley Fuller Fellowship, Cornell University Medical College, New York, N.Y. 



John Donald Gallagher 
Aaron Ganz 
Robert DeForest Gens 
Stanley Erwin Goodman 
William Anthony Grattan 
Robert Sherman Grayson 
Richard Stuart Green 
Ward Orin Griffen, Jr. 
Peter Daniel Guggenheim 
Charles Lee Heiskell, Jr. 
William Howard Hover 
Richard Hills James 



Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Beth Israel Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

University of California Hospital, San Francisco, Calif. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Meadowbrook Hospital, Hempstead, N.Y. 

Veterans Administration Hospital, Long Beach, Calif. 

Methodist Hospital of Brooklyn, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Colorado General Hospital, Denver, Colorado 

104 



INTERNSHIP APPOINTMENTS 



105 



Ira Hartley Kaufman 
\Villiain Thomas Kelly 
Calvin Murray Kunin 
James Mendon Ludwig, Jr. 
Milton Norman Luria 
Charles Wright MacMillan, 
Peter Raoul Mahrer 
Charles Anthony Malone 
Richard Francis Mattingly 
Robert Emmet McCable, Jr 
John Paul McCreary 
Allen \V'alter Mead 
Thomas Spurr Morse 
Jay Richard Olsen 
Robert Heyde Orth 
Jack Flemming Ostergaard 
Charles Wellington Pearse 
Joseph Edward Plastaras 
Richard Fleming Porter 
Arnold Henry Randell, Jr. 
James Leon Reichard 
Jack Richard 
\Villiam Kay Riker 
Harlan David Root 
Henry George Schmidt 
Abraham Isaac Schweid 
Richard Tobias Silver 
Gerald Murray Silverman 
Paul Albert Skudder 
David Elliott Sobel 
Charles Albert Stevens, Jr. 
James Calvin Strickler 
Philip Tager 
Thomas Lee Taylor 
Paul Richard Thornfeldt 
Kenneth Frederic Tucker 
Clifford Hohnholt Urban 
Heinz Valtin 
Richard Paul W^agner 
Richard W^ellman 
Florence Arlene Wilson 
Edward Albert Wolfson 
Bernard Arthur Yablin 



Bcllevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

City of Detroit Receiving Hospital, Detroit, Mich. 

New York Hospital, New York. N.Y. 

United States Army 

Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

Jr. Kings County Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Syracuse Medical Center, Syracuse, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Belle\ue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Salt Lake General Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah 

New Britain Hospital, New Britain, Conn. 

Allegheny Hospital, Allegheny, Pa. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Denver General Hospital, Denver, Colo. 

Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

George F. Geisinger Memorial Hospital, Danville, Pa. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

University of Minnesota Hospitals, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Belle\ue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Mary Fletcher Hospital, Burlington, Vt. 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Philadelphia General Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Good Samaritan Hospital, Portland, Ore. 

San Francisco Hospital, San Francisco, Calif. 

New York Hosptal, New^ York, N.Y. 

Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 

St. Luke's Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio 

New York Hospital, New York, N.Y. 

Genesee Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 



Kegister of Student Sj 1953-54 



FOURTH YEAR 



Frederick Ralph Abrams, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Ronald Hunt Allen, B.S. 1950, Fordham University 

Eugene Antelis, A.B. 1950, New York University 

Nancy Carolynn Arnold, A.B. 1950, Vassar College 

James Hartford Arthur, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

\v^ilmot Coles Ball, Jr., B.E. 1949, Johns Hopkins University 

Russel Mahdi Barakat, B.A. 1948, American University of Beirut 

M.S. 1950, Utah State Agricultural College 
Douglas Holmes Barns, B.S. 1950, St. Lawrence University 
Robert Leonard Beals, A.B. 1950, University of Maine 
Richard Perci\al Bigelow, A.B., 1951, University of Utah 
Sumner Theodore Bohee, B.S. 1950, Franklin and Marshall College 
Harold Thomas Brew, Jr., A.B. 1950, Middlebury College 
John Robert Buchanan, A.B. 1950, Amherst College 
Harry Edwin Cassel, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Marion Nielson Chall, A.B. 1950, Barnard College 
Hillary Anthony Chollet, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Theodore Avery Collier, B.S. 1950, Beloit College 
Richard \Varwick Dame, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Harry A\ arren Daniell, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
George Dermksian, A.B. 1948, M.A. 1950, Columbia University 



Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Teaneck, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Meadville, Pa. 

Ridgewood. X.J. 

Tehran, Iran 

Redwood, N.Y. 

Skowhegan, Maine 

Provo, Utah 

Lancaster, Pa. 

New York, N.Y. 

Fair Haven, N.J. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

New Orleans, La. 

New Canaan, Conn. 

Beechhurst, N.Y. 

Millinocket, Maine 

New York, N.Y. 



Louis Joseph Dougherty, Jr., A.B. 1950, Yale University 
Thomas Allen Edwards, A.B. 1950, AV'illiams College 
David Eisenberg, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Henry Ralph Erie, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Seneca Lawrence Erman, B.S. 1949, 

College of the City of New York 
Harrison Hatheway Farley, A.B. 1950, Westminster College 
James Charles Ford, B.S. 1950, Iowa State College 
Claude Ellis Forkner, Jr., A.B. 1949, Harvard University 
Walter Lewis Freedman, A.B. 1950, DePauw University 
Richard Theron Furr, A.B. 1950, University of Mississippi 
Eugene David Furth, A.B. 1950, Wesleyan University 
William Henry Gordon, Jr., B.S.E., 1947, University of Michigan; 

ALA. 1949, Columbia University 
William Charles Herbert Grimm, Jr., A.B. 1950, Syracuse University 
Myron Roberts Grover, Jr., A.B. 1950, Bowdoin College 
John Fowler Gustafson, A.B. 1950, Bowdoin College 
James Charles Hart, B.S. 1950, University of Arizona 
John Kenneth Herd, B.S. 1950, Rutgers University 
Alfred Turnbull Holt, A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College AVest Hartford, Conn. 

Richard James Homrighausen, A.B. 1950, Princeton University Princeton, N.J. 

Kenneth Andrew Hubel, A.B. 1950, University of Rochester Rye, N.Y. 

Edwin Max Jacobs, A.B. 1950, Reed College San Francisco, Calif. 

Da\ id Morrison Johnson, Jr., A.B. 1950, 

Ohio Wesleyan University Columbus, Ohio 

106 



Rockville Center, N.Y. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Rochester, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

\Vest Hempstead, N.Y. 

Alton, Illinois 

Boone, Iowa 

New York, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Aberdeen, Miss. 

Oak Ridge, Tenn. 



Detroit, Mich. 

Garfield, N.J. 
Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Laconia, N.H. 

Prescott, Ariz. 
Metuchen, N.J. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



107 



Norman Wolf KcUci, A.B. 1950, Colgate University 
Mclvin James King, A.B. 1950, Brown University 
John Joseph Knightly, A.B. 1950, St. Peter's College 
Herbert Andre Kroeze, Jr., B.S. 1950, University of Mississippi 
Richard Kindell Lansche, B.S. 1950, Northwestern University 
David Hillis Law, IV, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Bruce Carl Levy, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Donald Irvan Matern, A.B. 1950, VVesleyan University 
Andrew James McElhinney, Jr., B.S. 1950, Holy Cross College 
Cornelius Irving Meeker, A.B. 1950, Middlebury College 
Charles Donald Meier, A.B. 1950, Duke University 
Thomas Harry Meikle, Jr., A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Edward Stephen Mongan, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
\Villiam Edward Morse, B.S. 1950, University of Michigan 
James Wilson Mosley, A.B. 1950, University of Texas 



Philip Robert Nast, A.B. 1950, Washington and Jefferson College 

Nicholas Macy Nelson, B.S. 1950, Yale Uni^ersity 

Graham Dougald Newton, B.S. 1950, Davidson College 

Robert Augustine Newton, A.B. 1950, Amherst College 

Paul Fordham Nugent, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Alan Stimson Paterson, B.S. 1950, Yale University 

Robert Chester Patten, B.S. 1950, Davidson College 

Ann Sullivan Peterson, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

John Emerick Peterson, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

George Flory Pritchard, A.B. 1950, Williams College 

Robert Dean Quinn, A.B. 1950, Stanford University 

Philip Sloan Robbins, A.B. 1948, Cornell University 

John Frank Rose, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

Michael Sander Rost, A.B. 1950, Colgate University 

Robert Chase Runyon, A.B. 1950, Colimibia University 

Said Leonard Sanders, A.B. 1950, Kenyon College 

Paul Sherlock, B.S. 1950, Queens College 

Robert Ellis Shope, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 

Robert Perry Singer, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

John Richard Slattery, B.S. 1950, St. Peter's College 

Thornton Maxwell Stearns, A.B. 1950, Yale University 

Nathalie Alice Strahan, A.B. 1950, Wellesley College 

Corbet Harold Turner, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 

William Adam Vincent, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 

Warren ^Vhaley Warbasse, A.B. 1950, Princeton University 

James Carl Warenski, B.S. 1950, University of Utah 

Ralph Chester W^illiams, Jr., A.B. 1950, Cornell University 



Tuckahoe. N.Y. 

I*awtucket, R.I. 

Jersey City, N.J. 

Jackson, Miss. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Glendale, Calif. 

Katonah, N.^'. 

\V()rcester, Mass. 

Pelham, N.Y. 

Plainfield. N.J. 

Alexandria, \ a. 

Troy, Pa. 

Richmond Hill, N.Y. 

Kew Gardens, N.Y. 

Austin, Texas 

Butler, Pa. 



Franklin Park, N.J. 

Faison, N.C. 

Newton Center, Mass. 

East Hampton, N.Y. 

Rochester, N.Y. 

Miami, Fla. 

Rhinebeck, N.Y. 

Bethesda, Md. 

Bangor, Pa. 

Stanford, Calif. 

New York, N.Y. 

Montclair, N.J. 

Orange, N.J. 

Springfield, N.J. 

New^ York, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Kingston, N.J. 

Middletow^n, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

East Orange, N.J. 

Maplewood, N.J. 

East St. Louis, 111. 

Owego, N.Y. 

East Orange, N.J. 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

Chevy Chase, Md. 



THIRD YEAR 



John \'incent Abbott, Jr., A.B. 1950, University of Iowa 
Ronald Alfred Arky, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
I hane Asch, B.S. 1951, Columbia University 
Robert Coleman Atkins, A.B. 1951, University of Michigan 
William Sinclair Augerson, A.B. 1949, Bow^doin College 
Stephen McClintock Ayres, A.B. 1951, Gettysburg College 
David Baum, A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 
Edwin Lawrence Bierman, A.B. 1951, Brooklyn College 
Robert Sunderlin Brittain, A.B. 1951, Colgate University 



Glen Rock, N.J. 

New Brunswick, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Dayton, Ohio 

Ellenville, N.Y. 

Westfield, N.J. 

Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Spencerport, N.Y. 



108 



CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 



John Lyman Brown, Jr., A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Harry Gray Browne, A.B. 1951, Yale University 
Joseph Anthony Biula, A.B. 1951, Columbia Uni\crsity 
Donald John Cameron, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 
John Paul Clayton, A.B. 1951, Middlehury College 
Joseph Patrick Dineen, B.S. 1950, Fordham University 
Kemp Berner Doersch, A.B. 1951, Stanford University 
Richard Irwin Dudley, A.B. 1950, Cornell University; 

M.A. 1951, Emory University 
Maurice Everette Dyer, A.B. 1951, Columbia University 
Chester Monroe Edelman, Jr., A.B. 1951, Columbia University 
Robert Richard Engisch, B.S. 1951, Union College 
Howard Marvin Feinstein, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Terence Patrick Fogarty, A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 
Charles Frederick Frey, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 
Sorrell Newton Glover, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Stanley Martin Hanfling, A.B. 1951, Columbia University 
Paul Allen Hansch, A.B. 1948, Pomona College 
Maury Lloyd Hanson, A.B. 1951, Oberlin College 
William Hillis, A.B. 1951, Wesleyan University 
Charles Hoffman, Jr., A.B. 1951, Yale University 
Milton Hollenberg, A.B. 1951, Brooklyn College 
Charles Edward Hollerman, B.S. 1951, Allegheny College 
William Donald Horrigan, A.B. 1952, Dartmouth College 
Gilbert Dolan Huebner, A.B. 1951, Harvard University 
Reginald Harned Isele, A.B. 1951, Princeton University 
Martin George Jacobs, B.S. 1951, Franklin and Marshall College 
Kenneth Myron Jensen, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Joseph Eugene Johnston, A.B. 1950, M.S. 1951, B.S. 1952, 

University of Mississippi 
Hiram Kendall, Jr., A.B. 1951, Harvard University 
Kent Gordon Kimball, A.B. 1951, Yale University 
Peter Tamas Knoepfler, B.S. 1950, California Institute of 

Technology; M.A. 1951, Columbia University 
Joseph White Landau, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
John Beucler Lange, B.S. 1951, Franklin and Marshall College 
Richard Charles Lippincott, A.B. 1951, Williams College 
Richard Rowland Lower, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 
Lester Andrus Ludlow, A.B. 1951, Brigham Young University 
Robert Burnett McGandy, A.B. 1951, Harvard University 
Lowell Gilmore McLellan, B.S. 1951, Rutgers University 
Herman Richard Matern, A.B. 1949, Concordia Seminary 
Gunter Richard Meng, B.S. 1951, Cornell University 
Walter Alexander Murray, Jr., A.B. 1952, Columbia University 
William Alexander Neill, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 
James Franklin Oates, III, A.B. 1951, Princeton University 
Artemis George Pazianos, A.B. 1951, Wellesley College 
John Henry Per-Lee, A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 
Franklin Hewit Pfeiffenberger, A.B. 1951, Yale University 
John Greenwood Pierik, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Guy Downs Plunkett, B.S. 1951, Rutgers University 
James William Preuss, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
John Vincent Price, B.S. 1951, St. John's College 
Cedric Joseph Priebe, Jr., 1951, Fordham University 
Brian O'Malley Quinn, B.S. 1951, College of the Holy Cross 



Palisade, N.J. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Fort Lee, N.J. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Mineola, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Carmichael, Calif. 

New York, N.Y. 

Weston, Mo. 

New York, N.Y. 

Elizabeth, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Jamaica, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Greenwich, Conn. 

Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Turtle Creek, Pa. 

Waterbury, Conn. 

South Orange, N.J. 

Perth Amboy, N.J. 

Orange, N.J. 

Ithaca, N.Y. 

Oxford, Miss. 

Westerly, R.I. 

Greenwich, Conn. 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

Teaneck, N.J. 

Guilford, Conn. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Spanish Fork, Utah 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Woodbridge, N.J. 

Worcester, Mass. 

Ithaca, N.Y. 

Knoxville, Tenn. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Lake Forest, 111. 

Manchester, Conn. 

Larchmont, N.Y. 

Alton, 111. 

Providence, R.I. 

Bound Brook, N.J. 

Binghamton, N.Y. 

Belle Harbor, N.Y. 

Jackson Heights, N.Y. 

Rochester, N.Y. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



109 



Robert Edward Rentz, B.S. 1951, Trinity College 
Donald Paul Regula, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Roland Whan Richmond, A.B. 1951, Bethany College 
Ronald Stanley Romig, B.S. 1951, Albright C:ollege 
John Ross, Jr., A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 
Leslie Eugene Rudolf, Jr., B.S. 1951, Union College 
Steven Schenker, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Miles Harold Sigler, A.B. 1951, University of Rochester 
John Harrison Sipple, Jr., A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Herbert Jarvis Sorensen, A.B. 1951, Dartmouth College 
Frank George Standaert, A.B. 1951, Harvard University 
Paul Stucki, Jr., A.B. 1951, Hamilton College 
John Bernard Sullivan, B.S. 1951, Manhattan College 
Frederick Gregg Thompson, III, A.B. 1951, Yale University 
William Richard Thompson, A.B. 1951, University of Maine 
Forrest Travis Tutor, B.S. 1953, University of Mississippi 
Wolodymyr Tyschenko, B.S. 1952, Columbia University 
William Webb Van Stone, A.B. 1951, Swarthmore College 
Herbert Getty Vaughan, Jr., B.S. 1951, McGill University 
Frank James Veith, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Jane Harrison Walker, A.B. 1951, Byrn Mawr College 
Willard Travell Weeks, A.B. 1951, Amherst College 
Morton Raymond Weinstein, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
David Sanborn Wilcox, A.B. 1951, Williams College 
Edward Percy Williams, A.B. 1951, Bowdoin College 



West Hartford, Conn. 

Westwood, N.J. 

Nutley, N.J. 

Reading, Pa. 

Bronxville, N.Y, 

Pelham, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

Lakewood, Ohio 

Summit, N.J. 

Paterson, N.J. 

West New York, N.Y. 

Long Island City, N.Y. 

St. Joseph, Mo. 

Livermore Falls, Me. 

Randolph, Miss. 

New York, N.Y. 

Denver, Colo. 

Pelham, N.Y. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Hartford, Conn. 

Linneus, Maine 



SECOND YEAR 



Robert Richard Abel, A.B. 1952, Princeton University 
Donald Elliott Allen, B.S. 1952, Ohio State University 
Richard Allen Antell, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
W^illiam Henry Austin, A.B. 1952, Bowdoin College 
Archibald Hildreth Beard, Jr., A.B. 1952, Williams College 
Charles Henry Beckmann, B.S. 1952, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Elliott Ellias Blinderman, B.S. 1952, 

College of the City of New York 
Dana Charles Brooks, B.E.E. 1949, Cornell University 
Bertram S. Brown, B.S. 1952, Brooklyn College 
Harry Martin Butler, Jr. A.B. 1952, Denison University 
Clarence Elton Cahow, Jr., B.S. 1952, Davidson College 
Paul Daniel Carter, B.S. 1952, Wheaton College 
Philip Kenneth Carter, Jr., A.B. 1952, Wheaton College 
Jay Norman Cohn, B.S. 1952, Union College 
Thomas William Cook, A.B. 1952, Princeton University 
William Charles Cooper, B.S. 1953, Franklin & Marshall College 
Charles Eugene Davis, B.S. 1952, Arizona State College 
Lee Washington Davis, A.B. 1952, Amherst College 
John Whitlow Delano, B.S. 1952, Rutgers University 
Harvey Bruce Denson, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
Herbert Alban Dietzel, A.B. 1952, Colgate University 
Ronald Joseph Dorris, A.B. 1952, Harvard University 
John Wilson Espy, B.S. 1953, Franklin & Marshall College 
Robert Slora Fackler, A.B. 1952, Universitv of Rochester 



Elizabeth, N.J. 

Columbus, Ohio 

New York, N.Y. 

Cape Elizabeth, Maine 

Wayzata, Minn. 

St. Albans, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Orlando, Florida 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Newark, Ohio 

Fort Pierce, Florida 

Plainfield, N.J. 

Plainfield, N.J. 

Schenectady, N.Y. 

Westfield, N.J. 

Erie, Pa. 

Miami, Arizona 

Summit, N.J. 

Mountainside, N.J. 

Hackensack, N.J. 

Lakewood, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Brookville, Pa. 

Oak Park, 111. 



110 



CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 



W illiam Rush Facklcr, A.B. 1952, LInivcisity of Rochester 
Donald Peter Eeeney, B.S. 1952, (ioUege of the Holy Cross 
Irank Bartley Flood, B.S. 1952, Manhattan College 
Ridon Newell Ford, B.S. 1952, University of Utah 
John Christian Frank, B.S. 1952, Unixersty of Arizona 
Ivan B. Gendzel, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Sidney Goldstein, A.B. 1952, Cornell Unixersity 
Jack Goodman, A.B. 1952, American International College 
Joseph Grayzel, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
David Bruce Hayt, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Warren Herbert Higgins, Jr., A.B. 1952, Yale University 
Robert James Hubsmith, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
David McCIure Iszard, A.B. 1952, Bowdoin College 
Jerome Lee Jacobs, B.S. 1952, Queens College 
Ramon Rafael Joseph, B.S. 1952, Manhattan College 
Albert Zaven Kapikian, B.S. 1952, Queens College 
James Sanford Ketchum, A.B. 1952, Columbia University 
Donaldson Wright Kingsley, Jr., A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Stanley Joshua Landau, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
Arthur Maurice Levy, A.B. 1952, Harvard University 
David Beekley Lyon, A.B. 1952, University of Mississippi 
Sherburne Merrill Macfarlan, A.B. 1952, Lafayette College 
Donald Fred Mahnke, B.S. 1952, University of Wyoming 
Edward Joseph Margulies, B.S. 1952, Massachusetts Institute 

of Technology 
James Hamilton Mason, A.B. 1952, DePauw University 
Richard Key Mead, A.B. 1952, Haverford College 
Mitchell Mills, A.B. 1952, Princeton University 
Aubrey Stinson Miree, III, B.S. 1952, Davidson College 
Mildred Downs Moore, A.B. 1950, Barnard College; M.A. 1952, 

Mount Holyoke College 
Robert Roland Morgan, B.S. 1952, St. John's College 
AVilliam Alfred Morgan, Jr., A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Burton Albert Nault, A.B. 1952, Bowdoin College 
Joan Nesmith, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Mary Alice Newhall, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Joseph Oren, A.B. 1953, Cornell University Kew 

Carl Black Pollock, Jr., A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
John Henry Prunier, A.B. 1952, Colgate University 
Albin \Valter Ranch, Jr., A.B. 1952, Princeton University 
William Mitchell Reid, Jr., A.B. 1952, New York University 
Donald Jeffrey Reis, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
Nancy Bernadine Ripley, A.B. 1951, Cornell University 
Abdolhossein Ebtehaj Samiy, B.A. 1950, Stanford University 
James Richard Sartorius, B.S. 1952, Kansas State College 
Stuart Norman Scherr, A.B. 1952, Oberlin College 
Paul Schlein, A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
David Schottenfeld, A.B. 1952, Hamilton College 
George Charles Schussler, B.S. 1952, City College of New York 
Eugene Joseph Segre, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
Anne Margaret Shuttleworth, Cornell University 
John Edward Sinning, Jr., A.B. 1952, Cornell University 
Frederic Warren Smith, B.S. 1947, Kansas State College 
Robert Hayes Stackpole, A.B. 1952, Amherst College 



Oak Park, 111. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Forest Hills, N.Y. 

Farmington, Utah 

Phoenix, Ariz. 

New York, N.Y. 

Utica, N.Y. 

Springfield, Mass. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Great Neck, N.Y. 

Honolulu, T.H. 

Passaic, N.J. 

Elmira, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

San Juan, P.R. 

Flushing, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Hastings, Nebr. 

Cedarhurst, N.Y. 

Saranac Lake, N.Y. 

University, Miss. 

Hawthorne, N.J. 

Keeline, Wyoming 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Evanston, 111. 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 
^Vashington, D.C. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Chatham, N.J. 

Flushing, N.Y. 

Claymont, Dela. 

Exeter, N.H. 

Garden City, N.Y. 

Ithaca, N.Y. 

Gardens Hills, N.Y. 

Tarentum, Pa. 

Elmira, N.Y. 

South Orange, N.J. 

Waterbury, Conn. 

New York, N.Y. 

Staten Island, N.Y. 

Rasht, Iran 

Summit, N.J. 

New Rochelle, N.Y. 

Forest Hills, N.Y. 

Ridgewood, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Forest Hills, N.Y. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Marshalltown, Iowa 

DeLand, Florida 

Montclair, N.J. 



REGISTER OF S lUDEN IS 



111 



Peter Maxwell Tillotson, B.S. 1952, University of Utah 

Richard David Wagoner, A.B. 1952, Clarleton College 

Abraham Francis Ward, U.S. 1952, Manhattan College 

Richard Walter Weiskopf, A.B. 1952, Harvard University 

Robert Emmet Whalen, A.B. 1952, College of the Holy Cross 

Donald Richter Wieche, A.B. 1953, Miami University 

John Wynia Winkert, B.S. 1951, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn Biooklyn, N.Y 

John Phillips Young, A.B. 1953, Cornell University Rockville Centre, N.Y 



Sacramento, Calif. 

Rochester, Minn. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

New Rochelle, N.Y. 

White Plains, N.Y. 

Hamilton, Ohio 



FIRST YEAR 

Robert Francis Barreras, A.B. 1953, Columbia University 

James William Beattie, A.B. 1953, Bowdoin College 

Robert Howard Bierman, A.B. 1953, Amherst College 

Raymond McKendree Biggs, A.B. 1953, Bowdoin College 

William Chester Black, A.B. 1953, Brown University 

Bruce David Boselli, Cornell University 

Volker Brandt, A.B. 1953, Upsala College 

Roger Charles Breslau, A.B. 1953, Columbia University 

Hubert Sutton Bush, Jr., A.B. 1953, Dartmouth College 

Blake Cady, A.B. 1953, Amherst College 

Wallace Gibson Campbell, Jr., A.B. 1953, Harvard University 

Helen Elizabeth Carter, A.B. 1953, Wellesley College 

John Wallace Casper, A.B. 1950, Brigham Young University 

Ronald August Chez, A.B. 1953, Johns Hopkins 

Rosalie Mary Corigliano, B.S. 1953, Queens College 

William Joseph Costello, A.B. 1953, Holy Cross College 

Caspar Garcia de Paredes, Jr., A.B. 1953, DePauw University 

Panama 
Carlton Miles Dean, Jr., A.B. 1953, Washington University 
Peter Ellsworth Downs, A.B. 1953, Syracuse University 
Donald Lucien Duperret, B.S. 1950, Holy Cross College 
Alan Basil Echikson, A.B. 1953, Dartmouth College 
Roger Raymond Ecker, A.B. 1953, University of Arizona 
Kathryn Hawes Ehlers, A.B. 1953, Bryn Mawr College 
Mervyn Leon Elgart, B.S. 1953, Brooklyn College 
Daniel Fishkoff, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
John Andrew Gerda, A.B. 1949, Gorden College; M.A. 1951, 

Boston University; Ph.D. 1953, Columbia University 
Abdollah Solat Ghashghai, Stanford University 
David Gluck, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
Donald Peter Goldstein, A.B. 1949, Williams 
William Howard Graff, A.B. 1953, Bowdoin College 
John Packer Hanson, A.B. 1953, Wheaton College 
Robert Edmund Hardy, B.S. 1953, State College of VV^ishingion 
Edward Scott Hartmann, A.B. 1953, Columbia College 
Emery Sylvester Hetrick, Jr., A.B. 1953, Ohio Stale University 
Donald William Hoskins," B.S. 1953, Queens College 
Harriet Anne Hughes, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
Richard Estabrook Hunt, B.S. 1953, Trinity College 
Max James Kartchner, B.S. 1953, University of Arizona 
William Andrew Kemick, A.B. 1953, Rutgers Uni\ersity 
Marshall Glenn Kocnig, A.B. 1953, Oberlin College 
Costas Theodore Lambrew, A.B. 1953, Wcsleyan University 



Forest Hills, N.Y. 

Belmont, Mass. 

Summit, N.J. 

South Pomfret, Vt. 

Rutherford, N.J. 

Fan wood, N.J. 

Glen Ridge, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Kew Gardens, N.Y. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Savannah, Ga, 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Rigby, Idaho 

Beverly Hills, Calif. 

St.' Albans, N.Y. 

Bronxville, N.Y. 

, Republic of Panama 

Clayton, Mo. 

Southampton, N.Y. 

West Englewood, N.J. 

South Orange, N.J. 

Coolidge, Ariz. 

Jamaica, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Perth Amboy, N.J. 

Trumbull, Conn. 

Ghashghai, Iran 

Far Rockaway, N.Y. 

Froy, N.Y. 

Hawthorne, N.Y, 

Ramsey, N.J. 

Seattle, Wash. 

Hempstead, N.Y. 

Worlhington. Ohio 

W'hilestone, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Babylon, N.Y. 

St. David, Ariz. 

Irvington, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

AVest Orange, N.J. 



112 



CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 



Donald Branum Lalhiop, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
Fred \'ale Lobo\sky, Cornell University 
William 1 honias London, A.B. 1953, Oberlin College 
John Stephen Madaras, A.B. 1953, Holy Cross College 
Fred W illiani Martens, Jr., M.E. 1949, Stevens Institute 

of Technology 
Richard Wilson Martin, A.B. 1953, College of ^Vooster 
David Michael McGoldrick, A.B. 1953, Bowdoin College 
James Carlisle McLeod, Jr., A.B. 1953, University of North Carolina 
Charles Kenneth McSherry, B.S. 1953, Fordham University 
William \Valter Menninger, A.B. 1953, Stanford University 
Robert Anthony Michalski, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
Ir\in Donald Milovve, A.B. 1953, Columbia University 
Alfred Powell Morgan, Jr., B.E.E. 1953, Cornell University 
Edward Carl Muecke, A.B. 1953, Reed College 
James Anthony O'Connell, A.B. 1953, St. Peter's College 
Herbert Morton Oestreich, B.S. 1953, Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology 
David Anderson Ogden, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
^\ illiam Henry Plauth, Jr., A.B. 1953, Princeton University 
George Stewart Ray, B.S. 1950, Rutgers University 
Eugene Michael Renzi, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
Alan Burton Retik, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
Peter-Cyrus Rizzo, III, B.S. 1953, Georgetown University 
Waid Rogers, A.B. 1950, Yale University 
Ronald Neil Rosenbach, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
Edmund Otto Rothschild, A.B. 1953, New York University 
Cliarles Augusto Santos Buch, A.B. 1953, Harvard University 
Norman Edward Schaefer, A.B. 1949, ^Vagner College; 

M.A, 1952, Columbia University 
Lawrence Scherr, A.B. 1950, Cornell University 
Anne Lardner Shannon, A.B. 1950, Goucher College 
Theodore Shapiro, A.B. 1953, Wesleyan University 
Joyce Carolyn Shaver, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
Bernard Siegel, A.B. 1953, Colgate University 
John Appling Sours, A.B. 1953, Yale University 
Robert Malcolm Stafford, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
Stewart Stringfellow, B.S. 1947, Princeton 
Horace Reginald Taitt, New York University 
Harold Raymond Tatar, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
Donald Arthur Taylor, A.B. 1953, Columbia College 
Zygmunt Michael Tomkiewicz, A.B. 1953, Cornell University 
James Carmen \an Luik, B.S. 1951, Hillsdale College 
Lawrence Joseph \Verner, B.S. 1953, St. John's College 



Plainfield, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Perth Am boy, N.J. 

Bayonne, N.J. 

Whitestone, N.Y. 

Brookfield Center, Mass. 

West wood, Mass. 

Florence, S.C. 

New York, N.Y. 

Topeka, Kans. 

New Britain, Conn. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Short Hills, N.J. 

Portland, Ore. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Summit, N.J. 

Amity ville, N.Y. 

Port Washington^ N.Y. 

Watertown, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

New Rochelle, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

New York, N.Y. 

Santiago-de-Cuba, Cuba 

Staten Island, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Montclair, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Corning, N.Y. 

Tuckahoe, N.Y. 

Princeton, N.J. 

Urbana, 111. 

Hopedale, Mass. 

Brooklyn, NY. 

Gloversville, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Ithaca, N.Y. 

Rockaway Park, N.Y. 

W'oodhaven, N.Y. 



SUMMARY 

Fourth year 84 

Third year 86 

Second year 84 

First year 82 

Total 336 



Register of the M.edical College 
and Sloan-Kettering Staffs 

Abrahams, Irving Bacteriology & Immunology 53 

Adair, Frank E Surgery 85 

Adams, Harold B Pediatrics 70 

Advocate, Seymour Medicine 57 

Akelaitis, Andrew J Medicine (Neurology) 56 

Allen, Arthur C Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 102 

Allen, Edward B Psychiatry 76 

Almy, Thomas P Medicine 56 

Alpert, Harry Psychiatry 76 

Anderson, Arthur F Pediatrics 70 

Anderson, David Anatomy 51 

Ando, Richard E Pediatrics 71 

Antoville, Abraham A Medicine 57 

Applebaum, Jacob Surgery 86 

Araujo, Jorge Medicine 59 

Armstrong, William R Surgery 88 

Arsenault, Armand Surgery 86 

Artusio, Joseph F., Jr Surgery 65, 85 

Ashe, Barbara S Pediatrics 71 

Atkinson, Sam C Medicine 57 

Avellone, Joseph C Surgery 86 

Ayres, William H Surgery 86 

Baber, Julius J Surgery 88 

Baez, Silvio Medicine 56 

Bailey, Charles A Medicine 57 

Baker. David H Pediatrics 71 

Baldwin, Horace S Medicine 56 

Balensweig, Irvin Surgery (Orthopedics) 85 

Balis, Earl Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistrv) 100 

Ball, Thomas L Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Barber, Joan K Pediatrics 71 

Barbu, Valer Psychiatry 76 

Barclay, Ralph K Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 100 

Barish, Julian I Psychiatry 76 

Barnes, Lloyd T Medicine 57 

Barnes, William A Surgery 85 

Barnett, Henry L Pediatrics 70 

Barondess, Jeremiah A Medicine 59 

Barr, David Surgery 88 

Barr, David P Medicine 56 

Barrett, Martha J Physiology 74 

Baumgartner, Leona Pub. Health & Prcv. Med.; Pediatrics 70, 79 

Beal, John M Surgery 85 

Beals, Robert I Anatomy 51 

Beer, C. T Sloan-Kettering 100 

113 



114 THi: MKDICAL COLLVX.K 

Rehrman. Stanley J Surgery 85 

Belcher, Anne M Surgery 86 

Belleville, John \V Surgerv 88 

Bendich, Aaron Sloan-Kcttering (Biochemistry) 100 

Beneventi, Francis A Surgery 86 

Berenberg, Samuel R Pub. Health & Prev. Med.; Pediatrics 70, 79 

Berger, Lawrence Physiology 74 

Berkeley, Ruth P .Medicine 57 

Berle, Beatrice Medicine; Pub. Health S: Prev. Med 57, 79 

Berlin, Louis Medicine 56 

Berman, Mones Sloan-Kettering \ . . . 101 

Berntsen, Carl A., Jr .Medicine 59 

Berry, Charles M \natomy 51 

Beyer, Harold Sloan-Kettering (Biophysics) 101 

Biesele, John J Sloan-Kettering (Biology) 101 

Bilisoly, Frank X., IH Medicine 59 

Billo, Otto E Pediatrics 70 

Binger, Carl A Psychiatry 76 

Binkley, George E Surgery 85 

Birnbaum, Stanley J Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Bodansky, Oscar Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 100 

Bogatko, Frances H Pub. Health & Prev. Med. 79 

Bonnett, Sara A Psychiatry 76 

Bonsnes, Roy W Biochemistry; Obs.-Gyn 54, 65 

Bourgain, Rene-Henri Medicine 59 

Bowden, Lemuel Surgery 86 

Bowe, John J Surgery 86 

Boynton, Perry S., Jr Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Bradlow, H. Leon Sloan-Kettering 100 

Brasfield, Richard J Surgery 86 

Braunstein, Paul \V Surgery 88 

Breed, Charles X., Jr Surgery 86 

Breen, David S Surgery 88 

Brethwaite, Samuel H Medicine 57 

Brewer, McHenry S Surgery 88 

Brice, Mitchell Surgery 88 

Brittingham, Thomas E., II ... . Medicine 57 

Brodman, Keeve Medicine 56 

Bross, Irwin D. J Pub. Health & Prev. Med 79 

Brotherton, Robert J Biochemistry 54 

Brown, George B Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 100 

Brown, Veronica C Medicine 57 

Browme-Mayers, Albert N Psychiatry 76 

Brunschwig, Alexander Surgery 85 

Brush. A. Louise Psychiatry 76 

Bur ban, Douglas J Medicine 59 

Buchman, Myron I Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Buckstein, Jacob ft < u;1 '^^uiX^ i r ; n f> 56 

Birchenal, Joseph H. J . . . . . ,^oan-Kettering (Medicine) 101 

Burke, Grafton E Medicine 58 

Burke, William H Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Burkhardt, Edward .\ Medicine 58 

Burnett, Harry \V Radiology 83 

Butler, Katharine Medicine 56 

Buys, Xorman S Surgery 88 

Byers, Robert J Surgery 88 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 115 

Cahan, William G Surgery 86 

Callahan, Justin T Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Cardon, Philippe V., Jr Medicine 59 

Carey, Thomas I Surgery 86 

Carlen, Alexander Psychiatry 77 

Carlson, Arthur S Pathology 68 

Carlson, Eric T Psychiatry 76 

Carpenter, Walter T., Jr Pediatrics 70 

Carr, Henry A Medicine 56 

Carr, John Psychiatry 77 

Carter, Anne C Medicine 56 

Catlin, Daniel Surgery 86 

Cattell, McKeen Pharmacology 73 

Cavalieri, Liebe F Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 100 

Cecil, Russell L Medicine (Emeritus) 11 

Cerruli, Remo Psychiatry 77 

Chaves, Aaron D Pub. Health & Prev. Med.; Medicine 56, 79 

Cholette, Claude Surgery 87 

Choucroun, Nine Pub. Health & Prev. Med 79 

Christenson, William N Medicine 59 

Chu, Florence Chien-Hw a Radiology 83 

Cipollaro, Anthony C Medicine (Dermatology) 56 

Clapp, Paul Surgery 88 

Clark, Robert A Surgery 86 

Clarke, Donald A Sloan-Kettering (Pharmacology) 101 

Cleveland, Eric Psychiatry 76 

Cliffton, Eugene E Surgery 85 

Coats, Edward C Surgery 86 

Cobb, Clement B. P Pediatrics 70 

Cobb, John R Surgery (Orthopedics) 85 

Cohen, Eugene J Medicine 57 

Cole, John T Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Coley, Bradley L Surgery 85 

Condliffe, Peter G Biochemistry 54 

Console, Arthur D Surgery (Neurosurgery) 85 

Constantine, Elizabeth F Surgery 86 

Conte, Alexander Surgery 86 

Conway, Herbert Surgery 85 

Cooper, Howard N Psychiatry 76 

Cooper, William Surgery (Orthopedics) 85 

Cooper, William Surgery 88 

Cooper, William A Surgery 85 

Cormia, Frank E Medicine (Dermatology) 57 

Cornell, Carlton M Surgery 86 

Cornell, George N Surgery 88 

Cornell, Nelson W Surgery 85 

Cotton, John M Psychiatry 76 

Cox, Denton S Medicine 59 

Cox, Herbert W Pub. Health R: Prev. Med 79 

Craig, Robert L Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Cramer, Jean H. Abel : . . . Medicine 59 

Graver, Lloyd F Medicine 56 

Craver, W^illiam L Surgery 88 

Crawford, David B., Jr Obstetrics 8c Gynecology 65 

Crissey, Eleanor Psychiatry 76 



116 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Daniel, William \V Surgery 86 

Daniells, Helen E Psychiatry 76 

Dann, Margaret Pediatrics 70 

Dargeon, Harold \V. K Pediatrics 70 

Davidson, Murray Pediatrics 70 

Davis, Bernard D Pub. Health and Prev. Med 79 

Davis, Jeff Medicine 58 

Davis, Marion Medicine 58 

Davis, William Obstetrics R: Gvnecology 65 

Day, Emerson Pub. Health & Prev. Med 79 

Deans, Robert D Surgery 87 

Deddish, Michael R Surgery 85 

de Gara, Paul F Pathology; Pediatrics 68, 70 

DeHaven, Hugh R Pub. Health & Prev. Med 79 

Denker, Peter G Medicine (Neurology) 57 

Dennen, Edward H Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Denues, A. R. T Sloan-Kettering 101 

Despert, J. Louise Psychiatry 76 

Diamond, Henry D Medicine 57 

Diamond, Monroe T Medicine 58 

Diehl, Carolyn H Medicine 58 

Diethelm, Oskar Psychiatry 76 

Dillon, Thomas F Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Dineen, Peter Surgery 88 

Dingwall, James A., Ill Surgery 85 

Dorman, Philip J Physiology 74 

Dougherty, John \V Medicine 58 

Douglas, R. Gordon Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Dow, Robert L Surgery 88 

Draper, John "W Surgery (Urology) 85 

Drew, J. Edwin Surgery 87 

Dubilier, AVilliam, Jr Radiology 83 

DuBois, Eugene F Physiology (Emeritus) 11 

DuBois, Robert O Pediatrics 70 

Dudley, Guilford S Surgery 85 

Duley, Wade Surgery 87 

Dunbar, Howard S Surgery 86 

Dunlap, Edward A Surgery (Ophthalmology) 86 

Dunn, William H Psychiatry 76 

Dunning, Henry S Medicine (Neurology) 56 

du \'igneaud, Vincent Biochemistry 54 

Dworetzky, Murray Medicine 58 

Dyer, Charles F Surgery 88 

Eckardt, Robert E Medicine 58 

Eckel, John H Surgery 85 

Edwards, Dayton J Physiology (Emeritus); Sec'y of Faculty 9, 11 

Edwards, Herbert R Pub. Health & Prev. Med.' 79 

Egan, George F Surgery 85 

Egelston, DuBose Surgery 88 

Eggleston, Gary Medicine (Emeritus) 11 

Ehrenfeld, Ernest N Medicine 59 

Eisenbud, Mark Medicine 60 

Eliasberg, Helene Pediatrics 70 

Ellis, John T Pathology; Surgery 68, 86 

Ellison, Rose-Ruth Sloan-Kettering 102 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 117 

Elmendorf, DuMont F., Jr Medicine 60 

Engle, Mary A Pediatrics 70 

Engle, Ralph L., Jr Medicine 57 

Epstein, Nathan Pediatrics 70 

Erdman, Albert J., Jr Medicine 57 

Erhlich, Albert Pathology 68 

Escher, George C Sloan-Kettering 102 

Etz, Samuel I Obstetrics & Gynecology 66 

Evans, John A Radiology 83 

Evarts, Edward V Psychiatry 76 

Ewing, James H Pub. Health & Prev. Med 79 

Falk, Emil A Medicine 58 

Farmer, Lawrence Medicine 58 

Farr, Hollon W Surgery 86 

Farrar, Holden K Obstetrics & Gynecology 66 

Farrell, Frank W Surgery 87 

Farrow, Joseph H Surgery 86 

Fath, Robert B Medicine 58 

Feder, Aaron Medicine 57 

Ferguson, Frank C, Jr Pharmacology 73 

Ferguson, G. Renee Psychiatry 76 

Fiedler, George A Surgery (Urology) 86 

Fincher, Esther Medicine 60 

Fink, Austin I Surgery 87 

Finn, William F Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Fitzgerald, Patrick Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 102 

Fjelde, Audrey Sloan-Kettering 101 

Flandreau, Richard H Surgery 88 

Fleetwood, M. Freile Psychiatry 76 

Fleischmann, Edgar P Surgery 87 

Flores, Arturo Psychiatry 77 

Focht, Elizabeth F Radiology (Physics) 83 

Foley, William T Medicine 57 

Foot, N. Chandler Surgical Pathology (Emeritus) 11 

Foote, Frank W., Jr Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 102 

Foote, Franklin M Pub. Health & Prev. Med 79 

Forkner, Claude E Medicine 56 

Fox, Clifford H Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Fraad, Lewis M Pediatrics 70 

Franklin, John E Pediatrics 70 

Eraser, Alan W Psychiatry 76 

Frazell, Edgar L Surgery 86 

Freemond, Alan S Surgery 88 

Freund, Jules Pathology 68 

Freyberg, Richard H Medicine 56 

Friend, Charlotte Sloan-Kettering 101 

Friess, Constance Medicine 57 

Fukushima, David K Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 100 

Fuller, George R Physiology 74 

Fulton, Lyman A Medicine 58 

Gabel, Milton Surgery 87 

Gallagher, Thomas F Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 100 

Garb, Solomon Pharmacology 73 

Garrick, Thomas J Surgery 87 



118 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Ciaiisc, Ralph W Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Genghof, Dorothy S Biochemistry 54 

Genvert, Harold Surgery 86 

Geohegan, \\'illiam A Anatomy 51 

Gepfert, Randolph Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Gersh, Marvin J Pediatrics 70 

Gerson, Martin J Psychiatry 76 

Gerster, John C. A Surgery 86 

Gibbons, John Martin Medicine 58 

Gilder, Helena Biochemistry; Surgery 54, 86 

Gilmore, James Obstetrics & Gynecology 66 

Gilroy, Francis J Medicine 58 

Given, William P Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Glassman, Oscar Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Glenn, Frank Surgery 85 

Glynn, Martin J Pediatrics 70 

Goebel, David Medicine 60 

Goff , Alvin H Psychiatry 77 

Gold, Harry Pharmacology 73 

Goldberg, Henry P Pediatrics 70 

Goldstein, Gilbert Sloan-Kettering 100 

Goldstein, Oscar E Medicine 58 

Goodell, Helen Medicine 59 

Goodman, Morris Pediatrics 71 

Goodridge, Malcolm Medicine (Emeritus) 11 

Goodyear, Stephen Psychiatry 76 

Gordon, Dan M Surgery (Ophthalmology) 86 

Gordon, Leonard I Pediatrics 71 

Goulet, Anita H Surgery 88 

Grace, William J Medicine 56 

Gray, James G Surgery 88 

Greaves, Donald C Psychiatry 76 

Greeley, Arthur V Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Green, James L Surgery 87 

Greenacre, Phyllis Psychiatry 76 

Greenberg, Sidney M Medicine 57 

Greene, Theodore C Anatomy 51 

Greenspan, Waldo Medicine 60 

Greif , Roger L Physiology 74 

Gruber, Ellis Surgery 88 

Guenard, Eugene J Surgery 87 

Guion, Connie M Medicine (Emeritus) 11 

Guthrie, Keith O., Jr Medicine 58 

Guthrie, Robert Sloan-Kettering 101 

Hadley, Susan J Medicine 57 

Hagamen, Wilbur D Anatomy 51 

Hall, Theodore Sloan-Kettering 101 

Hamilton, Charles M Surgery 88 

Hamilton, Francis J Psychiatry 76 

Hanlon, Lawrence W Assistant Dean; Anatomy 9, 51 

Hansson, Kristian G Surgery (Physiotherapy) 85 

Haralambie, James Q Pediatrics 70 

Harland, Margaret Sloan-Kettering 101 

Harrar, James A Obstetrics R: Gynecology (Emeritus) 11 

Harrington, Helen Pediatrics 70 



MEDICAI. C0LLI:GE STAFF 119 

Harris, Richard L Psychiatry 70 

Harrison, Charles S Surgery 87 

Harrison, James S Surgery 87 

Harrold, Charles C, jr Surgery 87 

Hatterer, Lawrence J I'sychialry 77 

Hauser, Edwin T Medicine 56 

Hauser, Louis A Medicine 58 

Hausman, Louis Medicine (Neurology) 56 

Havens, Leston L Medicine 60 

Hays, Daniel M Surgery 87 

Hays, David S Medicine 58 

Hehre, Edward J Bacteriology & Innnunology 53 

Heimoff, Leonard 1 Medicine 58 

Hellman, Leon D Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 101 

Helper, Helen N Pediatrics 70 

Helpern, Herman C Medicine 58 

Helpern, Milton Medicine; Pathology 57, 68 

Henley, Elaine D Medicine 59 

Henley, Thomas F Psychiatry 77 

Henry, George W Psychiatry 76 

Hersh, Alexander Surgery 88 

Hetzel, Basil S Medicine 59 

Higinbotham, Norman L Surgery 86 

Hill, Malcolm R Surgery 88 

Hinkle, Lawrence E., Jr Medicine 57 

Hinsey, Joseph C Director 7 

Hirsch, Robert L Pathology 68 

Hobson, Lawrence B Medicine 58 

Hochstein, Elliot Medicine 57 

Holden, Jack Surgery 88 

Holman, Cranston W Surgery 85 

Holman, James M Surgery 87 

Hohnquist, Nelson D Pathology 68 

Holt, Evelyn Medicine 57 

Hood, Claude I Pathology 68 

Hood, Henry L Surgery 88 

Hooker, Russell H Surgery 87 

Hopper, Ma:ry Ellen Medicine 59 

Horger, Eugene L Medicine 58 

Horwith, Melvin Medicine 59 

Houde, Raymond W Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 101 

Howe, Suzanne A. 1 Surgery 87 

Huebner, Robert D Medicine 58 

Hughes, John H Psychiatry 77 

Humphreys, Gustavus A Surgery (Urology) 86 

Hunt, Frederick C Pediatrics 70 

Hurtado, Arnold V Medicine 60 

Hutchison, Dorris J Sloan-Kettering 101 

Hynes, Frank J Surgery 87 

Iscnhour, Albert P Surgery 88 

Jacobsen, Leif Y Medicine 58 

Jameison, Gerald R Psychiatry 76 

Janulis, Peter T Psychiatry 77 

Jaspin, George Radiology 83 



120 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Javci t, Carl T Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Jensen, D. Rees Surgery 86 

Johnson, Donald G Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Johnson, George, Jr Surgery 88 

Johnson, Scott Medicine 58 

Joslin, Doyle Surgery 86 

Joyner, Edmund N., Ill Pediatrics 70 

Kahn, Morton C Pub. Health & Prev. Med 79 

Kammerer, William H Medicine 57 

Kane, Francis D Psychiatry 77 

Kantor, Herbert G Radiology 83 

Kany, Alfred W Radiology 83 

Kao, Chien-Yuan Pathology 68 

Kaplan, Lawrence I Medicine 58 

Kappas, Attallah Sloan-Kettering 100 

Karnofsky, David A Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 101 

Kauer, George L Medicine 57 

Kauer, Joseph T Surgery 86 

Kean, B. H Medicine 57 

Keefer, Edward B. C Surgery 87 

Keegan, James M Radiology 83 

Kelley, Samuel F Surgery (Otolaryngology) 86 

Kellner, Aaron Pathology 68 

Kelly, James T Surgery 87 

Kemp, A. D Sloan-Kettering 100 

Kemp, Walter W Psychiatry 77 

Kensler, Charles J Pharmacology 73 

Kent, Ann P Obstetrics & Gynecology; 

Pub. Health & Prev. Med 65, 79 

Kerr, Dorothea M Psychiatry 77 

Kidd, John G Pathology 68 

Killip, Thomas, III Medicine 60 

Kinsella, Peter W Medicine 60 

Kirkland, Henry B Medicine 58 

Kirkpatrick, Price A Psychiatry 77 

Klebanoff , Seymour G Psychiatry 76 

Kliewer, David D Medicine 60 

Klingon, Gerald H Medicine 58 

Klumpp, Margaret Medicine 57 

Knehr, Charles A Psychiatry 77 

Knight, J. Vernon Medicine 57 

Koch, Henry J., Jr Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 101 

Koenig, Hedwig Pediatrics 70 

Kohl, Richard N Psychiatry 76 

Koprowska, Irena \natomy 51 

Korngold, Leonhard Sloan-Kettering 100 

Korsch, Barbara M Pediatrics 70 

Koteen, Herbert Medicine 57 

Koteen, Phyllis H Pediatrics 70 

Kramer, Elmer E Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Kramer, Milton L Medicine 56 

Kretchmer, Norman Pediatrics 70 

Kreth, Kay M Obstetrics & Gynecology 66 

Kritchevsky, Theodore H Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 100 

Kugler, Margaret M Pediatrics 70 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 121 

Riiscu, Tayyar Medicine 59 

Kwit, Nathaniel T Pharmacology 73 

La Due, John S Medicine . 57 

Lake, Michael Medicine 57 

LaMar, Norvelle C Psychiatry 76 

Lampe, Ernest W Anatomy; Surgery 51 , 85 

Landesman, Robert Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Langner, Helen P Psychiatry 77 

Langstadt, John R Obstetrics & Gynecology 66 

Lapham, Roger F Medicine 58 

Laprade, Claude Marie Medicine 59 

LaRochelle, Guy Y Psychiatry 77 

Laughlin, John S Sloan-Kettering (Biophysics) 101 

Lauson, Henry D Pediatrics; Physiology 70, 74 

Lavoie, Jean C Surgery 88 

Lawler, H. Claire Biochemistry 54 

Lawrence, Jerome Surgery 88 

Lawton, Richard W Physiology 74 

Leacock, Eleanor Psychiatry 77 

Leder, Harold L Medicine 58 

Lee, Richard E Medicine 57 

Leeds, Norma Sloan-Kettering 100 

Leighton, Alexander Hamilton . Psychiatry 76 

LeMaistre, Charles A Medicine 57 

Lemcke, Dorothea Medicine 58 

L'Esperance, Elise S Pub. Health &: Prev. Med. (Emeritus) 11 

Levine, Leon I Medicine 57 

Levine, Milton D Medicine 58 

Levine, Milton I Pediatrics 70 

Levine, Samuel Z Pediatrics 70 

Lewis, George M Medicine (Dermatology) 56 

Lewis, John S Surgery 87 

Ley, Allyn B Medicine 57 

Lichtman, Sol S Medicine 57 

Lieberman, Jerrold S Medicine 58 

Liebolt, Frederick L Surgery (Orthopedics) 85 

Lim, Wan N Pediatrics 71 

Lincoln, Asa L Medicine 56 

Lintz, Robert M Medicine 58 

Lipkin, Mack Medicine 57 

Livingstone, Ernest T Medicine 60 

Loebel, Robert O Medicine 58 

Lorenze, Edward J., HI Medicine (Physical Medicine) 57 

Loseke, Lucile Surgery 87 

Loveless, Mary H Medicine (Allergy) 56 

Lovell, George R Medicine 57 

Lubschez, Rose Pediatrics 70 

Luckey, E. Hugh Medicine 56 

Ludwig, Martha Biochemistry 54 

Lukas, Daniel S Medicine 57 

MacFee, William F Surgery 85 

MacLeod, John Anatomy; Physiology 51 , 74 

Magida, Melville G Pediatrics 71 

Maisel, Bernard Surgery 86 



122 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Manson, William G Pediatrics 71 

Marbury, Benjamin E Surgery; Obstetrics R: Gynecology (]■}, Sfi 

Mark, Howard I Surgery 88 

Marshall, Florence N Pediatrics 70 

Marshall, Victor F Surgery (Urology) 8;") 

Martin, Hayes E Surgery 85 



1/ 



Martin, Kirby A Medicine 

Masterson, James F., Jr Psychiatry 77 

Mazur, Abraham Medicine 57 

Mazzia. Valentino D Surgery 88 

McAulifTe, Gervais "\V Surgery (Otolaryngology) 85 

McCampbell, Stanley R Medicine 60 

McCandlish, Howard S Obstetrics &: (gynecology 65 

McClenahan, John L Radiology 83 

McClure, Roy D Surgery 87 

McCombs, A. Parks Medicine 58 

McCormack, Richard R Medicine 57 

McCune, Robert M Medicine 59 

McDermott, Walsh Medicine 56 

McDevitt, Ellen Medicine 58 

McGovern, James F Medicine 60 

McGowan, Frank J Surgery 86 

McGrath, John F Psychiatry 77 

McGraw, Thomas A Surgery 88 

Mcllveen, Marion Pediatrics 70 

McKenna, Robert J Surgery 88 

McLane, Charles M Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

McLarn, William D Obstetrics & Gynecology 66 

McLean, John M Surgery (Ophthalmology) 85 

McLellan, Allister M Surgery (Urology) 85 

McLellan, Frederick C Surgery (Urology) 86 

McNamara, Helen Pediatrics 71 

McNeer, Gordon Surgery 86 

McPeak, Charles J Surgery 87 

Mehler, Leopold Surgery 87 

Melchionna, Robert H Medicine 57 

Mellors, Robert C Sloan-Kettering (Biology) 101 

Melville, Donald B Biochemistry 54 

Mendelson, Curtis L Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Mercer, Mary E Pediatrics; Psychiatry 70, 76 

Milhorat, Ade T Medicine; Psychiatry 56, 76 

Miller, Raymond E Medicine 58 

Miller, Theodore R Surgery 87 

Milman, Anne Psychiatry 76 

Mindlin, Rowland L Pediatrics 70 

Miscall, Laurence Surgery 86 

Modell, Walter Pharmacology 73 

Moench, L. Mary Medicine 58 

Molander, Da\ id W Medicine 60 

Money, ^Villiam L Sloan-Kettering (Biology) 101 

Moore, Alice E Sloan-Kettering (Biology) 101 

Moore, James A Surgery (Otolaryngology) 85 

Moore, Oliver S Surgery 87 

Moore, S. W Surgery 85 

Morrill, Charles V Anatomy (Emeritus) 11 

Moura, Amil C Medicine 59 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 123 

Moves, Ann Z Surgery 88 

Mueller, George C Surgery 87 

Muhow, Patrick Medicine 60 

Munroe, \Villiam G. C Medicine 60 

Murphree, Harold C Surgery 88 

Murphv, AL Lois Sloan-Kettering 102 

Murphy, Willis A Medicine 58 

Muschenheim, Carl Medicine 56 

Myers, W. P. Laird Sloan-Kettering 102 

Xathanson, Joseph X Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Xegrin, Juan Surgery 87 

Xeill. James M Bacteriology & Immunology 53 

Xestler, Warren P Medicine 58 

Xew, Elizabeth V Pediatrics 71 

Xichols. J. Alan Surgery 88 

Nickel, ^Villiam F., Jr Surgery 85 

Xickerson, Kenneth G Obstetrics & Gynecology 66 

Xickson, James J Sloan-Kettering (Radiology) 103 

Norsa, Luigia Medicine 60 

Norton, Edward ^V. D Surgery 87 

Nydick, Irwin Medicine 58 

Nygien, Edward J Surgery 88 

Ogih ie, John B Surgery 87 

oicott, Charles T Pathology 68 

01i\er. Thomas K.. Jr Pediatrics 71 

Oljenick, Ignaz ^V Medicine (Xeurology) 60 

Ollstein, Philip Pub. Health & Prev. Med 79 

O'Xeill, Earl A Surgery 87 

O'Xeill John K Radiolog)' 83 

Opie, Eugene L Pathology (Emeritus) 11 

Opler, Marvin K Psychiatry 76 

Oppel, Theodore W Medicine 56 

Organick, Avrum B .' Medicine 60 

O'Regan, Charles H Pediatrics 70 

Ormond, Louise H Medicine 59 

Ostfeld, Adrian M Medicine 59 

O'Sullivan, AVard D Surgerv 86 

0\adia, Jacques Sloan-Kettering 101 

Overman, Ralph S Medicine 57 

Pack, George T Surgery 85 

Palmer, Arthur Surgery (Otolaryngolog^■) 85 

Papanicolaou, George Anatomy (Emeritus) 11 

Paquin, Albert J Surgery 87 

Pardee, Harold E. B Medicine 56 

Parker, Brent M Medicine 60 

Parsons, Herbert Surgery 86 

Patterson, Marjorie B Medicine 58 

Patterson, Robert L Surgery (Orthopedics) 86 

Patterson, Russel H Surgery 85 

Payne, Mary .\nn Medicine 57 

Pcabody, George E Medicine 58 

Pearce, John M Pathology; Surgery 68, 85 

Pearson, Olof H Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 101 



124 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Pearson, T. Arthur Radiology 83 

Peck, Robert K Psychiatry 77 

Perrone, Francis S Medicine 58 

Pert, James H Medicine 60 

Pctermann, Mary L Sloan-Kettering ( Biochemistry) 100 

Philips, Frederick S Sloan-Kettering 101 

Phillips, Ralph F Radiology 83 

Pierce, Virginia K Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Pitts, Robert F Physiology 74 

Plummer, Norman Medicine 57 

Poker, Nathan Radiology 83 

Pool, J. Lawrence Surgery 86 

Poppell, James W Sloan-Kettering 102 

Pressman, David Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 100 

Pritchett, R. A. Recs Medicine 58 

Prout, Curtis T Psychiatry 76 

Prout, George R., Jr Surgery 88 

Psarrou, Helen Surgery 87 

Pucci, Helio Medicine 59 



Quan, Stuart Q Surgery 



Rachele, Julian R Biochemistry 54 

Rackow, Leon L Psychiatry 77 

Rail, Joseph E Medicine 57 

Ramirez, Carlos M Medicine 59 

Randall, Henry T Sloan-Kettering (Surgery) 103 

Rawson, Rulon W Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 101 

Ray, Bronson S Surgery 85 

Reader, George G Medicine; Pharmacology 56, 73 

Redo, S. Frank Surgery 88 

Regan, Peter F Psychiatry 77 

Reilly, H. Christine Sloan-Kettering 101 

Reilly, Joseph F Pharmacology 73 

Rennie, Thomas A. C Psychiatry 76 

Ressler, Charles H Medicine 58 

Ressler, Charlotte Biochemistry 54 

Reznikoff , Paul Medicine 56 

Rhoads, Cornelius P Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 101 

Richards, Nelson G Medicine 60 

Richardson, Eric C Surgery 87 

Richardson, Henry B Medicine 56 

Richardson, Howard L Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 102 

Richter, Goetz W Pathology 68 

Rigney, Thomas G Pub. Health & Prev. Med 79 

Riker, Walter F., Jr Pharmacology 73 

Riley, Edgar A Medicine 58 

Rinzler, Seymour H Pharmacology 73 

Rizzo, Peter C Surgery (Orthopedics) 86 

Robbins, Guy F Surgery 87 

Robbins, Jacob Medicine 58 

Robbins, William C Medicine 58 

Roberts, Jay Pharmacology 73 

Roberts, Kathleen E Sloan-Kettering 102 

Robertson, Theodore Pathology 68 

Rockwell, Fred V Psychiatry 76 



II 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 125 

Rogatz, Peter Medicine 58 

Rogoff , Julius L Medicine 58 

Roll, Paul M Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 100 

Roosen, Willem \V Surgery 88 

Roseman, David M Medicine 60 

Rosenfeld, Robert Sloan-Kettering 100 

Roth, Kenneth Medicine 60 

Rothbard, Sidney Medicine 56 

Ruskin, Richard A Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Sabbatino, Joseph F Medicine 58 

Sackett, Nelson B Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Salamon, Ivan I Sloan-Kettering 100 

Samuels, Bernard R Surgery (Ophthalmology) (Emeritus) 11 

Scanlan, Theresa Medicine 59 

Schaefer, George Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Scharnagel, Isabel M Surgery 87 

Schildhaus, Andrew Surgery 87 

Schillinger, Arnold A Psychiatry 77 

Schlamowitz, Max Sloan-Kettering 100 

Schmidt, John G Surgery (Orthopedics) 86 

Schnaper, Edna Bacteriology & Immunology 53 

Schnittman, Morris Surgery 87 

Schoelly, Marie-Louise Psychiatry 77 

Schreier, Robert I Surgery 88 

Schulman, Irving Pediatrics 70 

Schwartz, Hans J Medicine (Dermatology) (Emeritus) 11 

Schwartz, Irving Radiology 83 

Schwartz, Morton K Sloan-Kettering 100 

Scrimshaw, George C Surgery 88 

Selby, Henry N Radiology 83 

Seybolt, John F Anatomy; Pathology 51 , 68 

Sheard, Charles Medicine 59 

Shepard, Edward M Medicine 59 

Sheppard, Erwin Medicine 57 

Sherfey, Mary J Psychiatry 76 

Sherman, Robert S Radiology 83 

Shibuya, Madoka Pediatrics 71 

Shorr, Ephraim Medicine (Endocrinology) 56 

Shultz, Selma M Medicine 59 

Siegel, Malcolm Sloan-Kettering 100 

Simon, Eric J Psychiatry 76 

Simon, Eugene P Medicine 59 

Simons, Donald J Medicine; Psychiatry 56, 77 

Simpson, George A Medicine 60 

Slater, Beatrice S Pediatrics 70 

Smedley, Lois M Pediatrics 70 

Smillie, Wilson G Pub. Health & Prev. Med 79 

Smith, Carl H Pediatrics 70 

Smith, Erwin F Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Smith, Frank R Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Smith, J. James Medicine 57 

Smith, Martha L Pediatrics 70 

Snodgrass, John J Radiology 83 

Snyder, Charles T Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Snyder, Ruth E Radiology ! 83 



12G THE MKDICAL COLLEGE 

Snyder, Stuart S Surgery (Ophthalmology) 86 

Soloway, Albert H Sloan-Kettering 100 

Sonenberg, Martin Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 102 

Southam, Chester M Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 102 

Speer, David S Surgery 87 

Spellman, Robert M Surgery 87 

Spencer, Thomas R Medicine 59 

Spielman, Aaron 1) Medicine 59 

Spier, L Robert Surgery 88 

Spitz, Sophie Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 102 

Srole, Leo Psychiatry 76 

Stanton, Edward F Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Stark, Richard B Surgery (Plastic Surgery) 86 

Stearns, Maus AV., Jr Surgery 87 

Steinberg, Herman Medicine 59 

Steinberg, Israel Medicine; Radiology 57, 83 

Stephens, Richmond Surgery (Orthopedics) 85 

Stern, Gertrude S Pediatrics 71 

Sternberg, Stephen S Sloan-Kettering 102 

Stevens, Alexander R Surgery (Urology) (Emeritus) 11 

Stevenson, Lewis D Pathology; Medicine (Neurology) 56, 68 

Stewart, Fred ^V Sloan-Kettering (Pathology) 102 

Stewart, Harold J Medicine 56 

Stillerman, Maxwell Pediatrics 71 

Stimson, Philip M Pediatrics 70 

Stock, C. Chester Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 101 

Stockhamer, Nathan Psychiatry 71 

Stokes, Peter E Medicine 60 

Straub, Lee R Surgery 87 

Straub, Leonard R Psychiatry 77 

Struve, John F Surgery 87 

Stubenbord, \Villiam D Medicine 57 

Sugg, John Y Bacteriologv & Immunology 53 

Suh, Succjo Medicine 59 

Sullivan, Joseph D Psychiatry 77 

Sullivan, W. James Physiology 74 

Sunderland, Douglas Sloan-Kettering 102 

Sutherland, Arthur M Medicine 57 

Sutton, John E Surgery 86 

Sved, Dorothy \V Sloan-Kettering 102 

Swan, Roy C Physiology 74 

Sw^eeney, Lawrence Medicine 60 

Sweeney, William J Obstetrics & Gynecology 65 

Sweet, Joshua E Experimental Surgery (Emeritus) 11 

Swift, Katharine W Medicine 59 

Sykes, Marguerite Sloan-Kettering 102 

Symons, Cecil Medicine ri9 

Syz, Hans Psychiatry 77 

Tagnon, Henry J Medicine 56 

Taussky, Hertha H Medicine r79 

Taylor, Alexander Medicine 59 

Taylor, John J Anatomy 51 

Taylor, Sterling P., Jr Biochemistry 54 

Temple, Harold L Radiology 83 

Thompson, T. Campbell Surgery (Orthopedics) 85 



MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 127 

Thorbjai naisoii, Bjorn Surgery 88 

Timpanclli, Alphonse E Medicine 56 

Timriid, David INychian y 77 

Todd, Jean E Pat hology 68 

Tollefsen, H. Randall Surgery 87 

Tolstoi, Edward Medicine 56 

Tompsett, Ralph Medicine 56 

Toolan, Helene W Sloan-Kettcring (Pathology) 101 

Topkins, Marjorie J Surgery 88 

Torre, Douglas P Medicine 59 

Toscani, Vincent A Medicine 59 

Travell, Janet Pharmacology 73 

Travis, John H Psychiatry 76 

Treves, Norman L Surgery 85 

Troutman, Richard C Surgery 87 

Tulin, Maurice Medicine 59 

Tweddel, George Surgery 87 

Twinem, Francis P Surgery (Urology) 86 

Twiss, J. Russell Medicine 59 

Tyndall, Marian Medicine 59 

IJltmann, John E Medicine 60 

Urban, Jerome A Surgery 87 

Valergakis, Frederick E. G Medicine 59 

Van Mater, John S Obstetrics & Gynecology 66 

Vogel, F. Stephen Pathology; Surgery 68, 86 

VomSaal, Frederick Surgery 87 

Wade, Preston A Surgery 85 

Wadsworth, Morton Psychiatry 77 

Wagner, Lewis C Surgery (Orthopedics) 85 

Wagner, Robert M Obstetrics & Gynecology 66 

Walker, John M Sloan-Kettering (Surgery) 103 

Wall, James H Psychiatry 76 

Wallis, Lila A Medicine 59 

Warner, Nathaniel Psychiatry 77 

Watson, Robert F Medicine 56 

Watson, William L Surgery 86 

Way, Howard Surgery 88 

Weber, Frederick C, Jr Medicine 59 

Webster, Bruce P Medicine 56 

Weeden, Willis M Surgery; Pub. Health & Prev, Med 79, 87 

Weider, Arthur Psychiatry 76 

Weinfeld, Herbert Sloan-Kettcring 100 

Weintraub, Sydney Radiology 83 

Weinstock, Irwin M Psychiatry 77 

Welch, Livingston Psychiatry 76 

Wells, Aaron O Medicine 59 

Welsch, Exie Elizabeth Psychiatry 76 

Werner, Charles A Medicine 59 

Werner, Erwin A Medicine 59 

Wertz, Frederick J Psychiatry 77 

West, Charles D Sloan-Kettering (Medicine) 102 

West, John P Singery 86 

Westley, Kent F Radiology 83 



128 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 

W'cynuillcr, Louis E Pediatrics 70 

\Vhcatlcy, Mai jorie A Pediatrics 70 

Wheeler, Charles H Medicine 56 

White, Stephen Radiology 83 

Whitmore, \Villet F., Jr Surgery (Urology) 85 

^Vhitney, Doris S Pediatrics 71 

\\ ick, Homer C, Jr Pub. Health & Prev. Med 79 

Wielawski, Joseph S Psychiatry 77 

Wierum, Carl Medicine 60 

Wilber, Mary M Medicine 59 

Willard, Harold N Medicine; Pub. Health R: Prev. Med 59, 79 

^Villiams, Byard Medicine 56 

^Vilson, May G Pediatrics 70 

VV^ilson, Philip D Surgery (Orthopedics) 85 

^Vilson, Philip D., Jr Surgery 88 

\Vingebach, Wilfred D Surgery 87 

Wolbach, Robert A Physiology 74 

AV'olff, Harold G Medicine (Neurology); Psychiatry 56, 76 

W^olff , William I Surgery '. .' 87 

W^oodard, Helen Q Sloan-Kettering (Biochemistry) 100 

\Voods, Ruth Biochemistry 54 

\Voodward, Walter D Psychiatry; Pub. Health R: Prev. Med 77, 79 

Woolley, George W Sloan-Kettering (Biology) 101 

Wright! Harold S Psychiatry .' 77 

Wright, Irving S Medicine 56 

Wright, Mary Elizabeth Biochemistry 54 

Wroblewski, Felix Medicine 59 

Yeager, Robert L Medicine (Tuberculosis) 60 

Zborowski, Mark Medicine 59 

Zins, Eugene I Medicine 60 

Zipser, Stanley S Pediatrics 71 

Zucker, Seymour Medicine 59 

Zufall, Robert B Surgery 87 

SUMMARY OF MEDICAL COLLEGE STAFF 

Full Professors 40 

Associate Professors 98 

Assistant Professors 188 

Instructors, Assistants, etc 443 

Total 769 

SUMMARY OF SLOAN-KETTERING DIVISION STAFF 

Full Professors 11 

Associate Professors 12 

Assistant Professors 21 

Instructors, Assistants, etc 34 

Total 78 



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CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

AUGUST 12, 1954 

Nledical College 

ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOR 1954-55 SESSIONS 



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CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
MEDICAL COLLEGE 

1300 York Avenue. New York 21, N.Y. 



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CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICMAL PI 



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Contents 



Calendar 

The New York Hospital — Cornell Medical Center 

The College Council . . 

The College Advisory Committee 
Standing Committees .... 

Faculty 

General Statement 

Requirements for Admission and Graduation 
General Information 

Fees, Residence, Prizes, Scholarships, Loans 

Cornell University Medical College Alumni Association 
Educational Policies and Plan of Instruction 
Description of Courses 

Anatomy 

Biochemistry 

Medicine 

Medical Comprehensive Care 

Microbiology and Immunology 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Pathology 

Pediatrics 

Pharmacology 

Physiology and Biophysics 

Psychiatry 

Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

Radiology 

Surger\' 

Special Students 

Table of Required Hours 

Sloan-Ketterinor Division and Faculty 

Internship Aopointments, Class of 1954 

Register of Students, 1954-55 

Register of Medical Colles^e and Sloan-Ketterins: Staffs 



3 

4 
5 
5 
7 
8 
25 
31 

38 
46 
48 

50 
52 

54 
61 
63 
64 
68 
70 
73 
74 
76 
79 
82 
84 
90 
91 
96 
104 
106 
113 



1954 


1955 


July 




January 






July 


S M T W T F S S 


M T W T 


F s 


s 


M T VV T F S 


1 2 3 




1 




1 2 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


2 


3 4 5 6 


7 8 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


9 


10 11 12 13 


14 15 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


16 


17 18 19 20 


21 22 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 


24 25 26 27 


28 29 


24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


; 30 


31 




31 




August 




February 






August 


S M T W T F S 


s 


M T W T 


F s 


s 


M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 




1 2 3 


4 5 




12 3 4 5 6 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


6 


7 8 9 10 


11 12 


7 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


13 


14 15 16 17 


18 19 


14 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


20 


21 22 23 24 


25 26 


21 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


29 30 31 


27 


28 




28 


29 30 31 


September 




March 






September 


SMTWTFS'S 


M T W T 


F s 


s 


M T VV T F s 


12 3 4 




1 2 3 


4 5 




1 2 3 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


6 


7 8 9 10 


11 12 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


13 


14 15 16 17 


18 19 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


26 27 28 29 30 


27 28 29 30 31 




25 


26 27 28 29 30 


October 




April 






October 


S M T W T F S 


s 


M T \V T 


F S 


s 


M T VV T F S 


1 2 






1 2 




1 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


3 


4 5 6 7 


8 9 


2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


10 


11 12 13 14 


15 16 


9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


17 


18 19 20 21 


22 23 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


31 








30 31 


November 




May 






November 


S M T W T F s 


s 


M T W T 


F S 


s 


M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 


1 


2 3 4 5 


6 7 




12 3 4 5 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


8 


9 10 11 12 


13 14 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


28 29 30 ; 29 


30 31 




27 


28 29 30 


December 




June 






December 


S M T W T F s 


s 


M T \V T 


F S 


s 


M T VV T F S 


12 3 4 




1 2 


3 4 




1 2 3 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


5 


6 7 8 9 


10 11 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


12 


13 14 15 16 


17 18 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 25 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 




25 


26 27 28 29 30 31 






Calendar 



1954 



June 28 Registration and beginning of instruction for fourth year 

students, first division. 

July 5 Independence Day — holiday. 

Aug. 20 Second division begins for fourth year students. 

Sept. 6 Labor Day — holiday. 

Sept. 13-14 Examinations for conditioned students. Uul 4 |968 

Sept. 13-15 Registration for first, second, and third year<Gjasses. 

Sept. 15 Opening exercises, 3 : 30 p.m. ^^^^VFNUE N Y.*"^*^* 

Sept. 16 Instruction begins for first, second, and third year cY * 

9 a.m. 

Oct. 12 Columbus Day — holiday. 

Oct. 14 Third division begins for fourth year students. 

Nov. 25 Thanksgiving Day — holiday. 

Dec. 1-2 Examinations for second year students. 

Dec. 2 Fall term ends, 5 p.m. 

Dec. 3 Winter term begins, 9 a.m. 

Dec. 7 Fourth division begins for fourth year students. 

Dec. 18 Christmas recess begins, 1 p.m. 

1955 

Jan. 3 Christmas recess ends, 9 a.m. 

Feb. 1 1 Fifth division begins for fourth year students. 

Feb. 12 Lincoln's Birthday — holiday. 

Feb. 22 Washington's Birthday — holiday. 

Mar. 4-5 Examinations for first year students. 

Mar. 5 Winter term ends, 1 p.m. 

Mar. 6-13 Spring recess. 

Mar. 14 Spring term begins, 9 a.m. 

Apr. 7 Sixth division begins for fourth year students. 

May 28 Instruction ends for all classes, 1 p.m. 

May 30 Memorial Day^holiday. 

May 31- 

June 3 Final examinations. 

June 8 Commencement, 2 : 30 p.m. 



The New York Hospital — Cornell 
M.edical Center 



THE CENTER was formed by an agreement between the Society of 
the New York Hospital and Cornell University in order to associate 
organically the hospital and the medical college and to effect a complete 
coordination of the medical, educational, and scientific activities of the 
two institutions. 

The Center is operated under the supervision of a Joint Administra- 
tive Board, composed of three governors of the Society of the New York 
Hospital, three representatives of the Board of Trustees of Cornell Uni- 
versity, and one other member elected by the appointed members. The 
Director of the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center is the chief 
executive officer of the Joint Administrative Board, composed of the 
following: 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Director, 
The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center 

Deane W. Malott, Chairman Hamilton Hadley 

Arthur H. Dean Henry S. Sturgis 

Stanton Griffis John Hay Whitney 
John W. Davis 

FORM FOR BEQUESTS 

The Society of the New York Hospital is associated with the Cornell 
University Medical College, which is one of the colleges of Cornell Uni- 
versity, under the title of "The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center." 

Gifts or bequests should be made either to the Hospital or to the Uni- 
versity, but not to the above-named Association. 

If for the Hospital, the language may be: "I give and bequeath to the 
Society of the New York Hospital, the sum of $ ." 

If for the College, the language may be : "I give and bequeath to Cor- 
nell University the sum of $ for use in connection with its Medical 

College in New York City." If it is desired that a gift shall be used in 
whole or in part for any specific purpose in connection with the College, 
such use may be specified. 



THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 5 

THE COLLEGE COUNCIL 

For the purpose of discharging its duties to the Memorial Hospital 
under the Douglas Deeds of Trust, the Board of Trustees is constituted 
as the Council of the Cornell University Medical College in New York 
City. 

THE COLLEGE ADMSORY COMMITTEE 

There is also established a Medical College Ad\ isory Committee, 
which shall consist of ele\en members: the President of the University, 
who shall be Chainnan; the Director of the New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center; four trustees to be elected by the Board of Trustees, one 
of whom shall be elected each year for the term of four years; the Dean 
of the Medical College; two members of the Faculty of the Medical Col- 
lege, to be elected by such Faculty, one each year for the term of two 
years; two alumni of the Medical College, one to be appointed by the 
Medical College Alumni Association and the other by the Board of 
Trustees, each for a term of one year. 

The Committee at present consists of the following members: 
Deane W. Malott^ President of the University. Chairman, ex officio 
E. Hugh Luckey, Dean of the Medical College, ex officio 
Joseph C. Hinsey, Director, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 

Center, ex officio 
Dorothy McS. Arnold 
Stanton Griffis 
Jacob G. Schurman, Jr. 
William B. Cornell 

James M. Neill 
Samuel Z. Levine 

William A. Barnes I . i a i 

T e wr ( ^' the Alumni 

Irving S. Wright I 

Edward K. Taylor. Secretary 



\ 


of the Board 


s 


of Trustees 


\ 

f 


of the Faculty 



Officers of Administration 



Deane W. Malott, President of the University 

E. Hugh Luckey, Dean of the Medical College 

Lawrence W. Hanlon, Assistant Dean 

Dayton J. Edwards, Secretary of the Faculty 

Edward K. Taylor, Assistant Treasurer and Business Manage) 

Beatrice Berle, Counselor to Foreign Students 

Anna F. Burke, Librarian 



EXECUTIVE FACULTY 


Deane W. 


Malott 


David P. Barr 


Joseph C. Hinsey 


McKeen Cattell 


John G. Kidd 


Oskar Diethelm 


Samuel Z. Levine 


R. Gordon Douglas 


E. Hugh Luckey 


Vincent du Vigneaud 


James M. Neill 


Frank Glenn 


Robert F. Pitts 


Lawrence W. Hanlon 


Wilson G. Smillie 


# 





Standing Committees' 



COMMITTEE ON CURRICULUM 

\'incent du Vigneaud, Chairman 
David P. Barr John G. Kidd 

Oskar Diethelm Samuel Z. Levine 

R, Gordon Douglas S. W. Moore 

John Y. Sugg 



COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Lawrence W. Hanlon, Chairman 
WilHam H. Dunn Richard B. Stark 

Dayton J. Edwards Alphonse E. Timpanelli 

Donald B. Melville Preston A. Wade 



LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

Thomas P. Almy, Chairman 
Henry L. Barnett Frank Glenn 

Harry W. Burnett John MacLeod 

McKeen Cattell Julian R. Rachele 

Anna F. Burke 



COMMITTEE ON PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

E. Hugh Luckey, Chairman 
Heads of departments, or their representatives, responsible for the more impor- 
tant courses of each vear. 



COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS 

James M. Neill, Chairman 
John M. McLean S. W. Moore 

Paul ReznikofT 



COMMITTEE ON PRIZES IN RESEARCH 

Robert F. Pitts, Chairman 
Thomas P, Almy John MacLeod 

John M. Pearce 



•The Dean is ex officio a member of all committees. 

7 



Faculty 



DEANE W. MALOTT, President of the University. (A.B. 1921, University of 
Kansas; M.B.A. 1923, Harvard Business School; LL.D. 1941, Washburn Uni- 
versity; LL.D. 1951, Bryant College; LL.D. 1951, Hamilton College.) 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

RUSSELL L. CECIL, M.D. [1910: 1950] Professor of Clinical Medicine 

EUGENE F. Dubois, M.D. [1910; 1950] Professor of Physiology 

DAYTON J. EDWARDS, Ph.D. [1918; 1950] Professor of Physiology 

CARY EGGLESTON, M.D. [1911; 1953] Professor of Clinical Medicine 

N. CHANDLER FOOT, M.D., [1932; 1948] Professor of Surgical Pathology 

MALCOLM GOODRIDGE, M.D. [1910; 1946] Professor of Clinical Medicine 
CONNIE M. GUION, M.D. [1924; 1951] Professor of Clinical Medicine 

JAMES A. HARRAR, M.D. [1932; 1948] Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

and Gynecology 
ELISE STRANG L'ESPERANCE, M.D. [1910; 1950] Professor of Clinical 

Public Health and Preventive Medicine 
CHARLES V. MORRILL, Ph.D. [1915; 1953] Professor of Anatomy 

EUGENE L. OPIE, M.D. [1932; 1941] Professor of Pathology 

GEORGE PAPANICOLAOU, M.D. [1914; 1951] Professor of Clinical 

Anatomy 
BERNARD R. SAMUELS, M.D. [1914; 1942] Professor of Clinical Surgery 

[Ophthalmology) 
HANS J. SCHWARTZ, M.D. [1911; 1942] Professor of Clinical Medicine 

{Dermatology) 
ALEXANDER R. STEVENS, M.D. [1924: 1946] Professor of Clinical Surgery 

{Urology) 
JOSHUA E. SWEET, M.D. [1926; 1941] Professor of Experimental Surgery 

PROFESSORS 

DAVID P. BARR, Professor of Medicine. Physician-in-Chief, New York Hospital; 

Consulting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1911, M.D. 1914, Cornell: LL.D. 

1929, Central College; Sc.D. 1946, Washington University. [1916: 1941]) 
ALEXANDER BRUNSCHWIG, Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 

Memorial Hospital. (B.A. 1923, M.S. 1924, University of Chicago: M.D. 1926, 

Rush. [1947]) 
McKEEN CATTELL, Professor of Pharmacology. (B.S. 1914, Columbia; A.M. 

1917, Ph.D. 1920, M.D. 1924, Harvard. [1924: 1943]) 
LLOYD F. GRAVER, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, Memo- 
rial Hospital. (A.B. 1915, M.D. 1918, Cornell. [1934; 1952]) 
OSKAR DIETHELM, Professor of Psychiatry. Psychiatrist-in-Chief, New York 

Hospital. (Statsexamen 1922, U. of Zurich; M.D. 1923, U. of Berne. [1936]) 



•The figures in brackets following the name of each facult\' member indicate the date of 
original appointment and the year of induction into present rank. 



FACULTY 9 

R. GORDON DOUGLAS, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Obstetrician- 
and-Gynecologist-in-Chief, New York Hospital. (M.D.C.M. 1924, McGill. 
[1932; 1949]) 

GUILFORD S. DUDLEY, Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, New 
York Hospital; Consultant in Surgery, Second Surgical Division, Bellevue Hos- 
pital. (A.B. 1910, M.D. 1913, Cornell. [1917; 1949]) 

VINCENT DU VIGNEAUD, Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1923, M.S. 1924, 
Illinois; Ph.D. 1927, Rochester. [1938]) 

JOHN A. EVANS, Professor of Clinical Radiology. Radiologist-in-Chief, New 
York Hospital. (B.S. 1931, New York University; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1937; 
1953]) 

CLAUDE E. FORKNER, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1922, M.A. 1923, University of California; M.D. 
1926, Harvard. [1938; 1953]) 

FRANK GLENN, Lewis Atterbury Stimson Professor of Surgery. Surgeon-in-Chief, 
New York Hospital. (M.D. 1927, Washington University. [1932; 1947]) 

HARRY GOLD, Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (A.B. 1919, M.D. 1922, Cor- 
nell. [1922; 1947]) 

PHYLLIS GREENACRE, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Attending Psychiatrist, 
New York Hospital. (B.S. 1913, U. of Chicago: M.D. 1916, Rush. [1932; 
1933]) 

LOUIS HAUSMAN, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). Associate At- 
tending Physician (Neurology), New York Hospital; Visiting Neurologist in 
Charge, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1912, College of the City of New York; M.D. 
1916, Cornell. [1923; 1945]) 

JOHN G. KIDD, Professor of Pathology. Pathologist-in-Chief. New York Hospital. 
(A.B. 1928, Duke; M.D. 1932, Johns Hopkins. [1944]) 

SAMUEL Z. LEVINE, Professor of Pediatrics. Pediatrician-in-Chief, New York 
Hospital. (A.B. 1916, College of the Citv of New York: M.D. 1920, Cornell. 
[1924: 1936]) 

GEORGE M. LEWIS, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatology). Attending 
Physician (Dermatology), New York Hospital. (M.D. 1925, University of Al- 
berta; L.M.C.C. 1925, Medical College of Canada. [1932; 1949]) 

ASA L. LINCOLN, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1910, M.A. 
1911, Elon College; M.D. 1916, Johns Hopkins. [1921; 1941]) 

WILLIAM F. MacFEE, Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, New 
York Hospital. (A.B. 1914, University of Tennessee; M.D. 1918, Johns Hopkins, 
[1936; 1952]) 

JOHN M. McLEAN, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). Attending 
Surgeon in Charge of Ophthalmology, New York Hospital. (M.E. 1930, Stevens 
Institute; M.D. 1934, Cornell. [1941; 1943]) 

JAMES M. NEILL, Professor of Microbiology and hnmunology. (B.S. 1917, Alle- 
gheny; Ph.D. 1921, Massachusetts Agricultural College; D.Sc. 1940, Allegheny. 
[1931]) 

MARVIN K. OPLER, Visiting Professor of Anthropology (Social Psychiatry). 

(A.B. 1935, University of Michigan; Ph.D. 1938, Columbia University. [1953]) 
JOHN M. PEARCE, Professor of Pathology; Professor of Pathology in Surgery. 

Attending Pathologist, New York Hospital. (Ph.B. 1930, Yale; M.D. 1934, 

Harvard. [1948]) 

ROBERT F. PITTS, Professor of Physiology. (B.S. 1929, Butler University: Ph.D. 
1932, Johns Hopkins; M.D. 1938, New York University. [1942; 1950]') 



10 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

BRONSON S. RAY, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). Attending Sur- 
geon in Charge of Neurosurgery, New York Hospital ; Consulting Neuro-surgeon, 
New York Hospital, Westchester Division; Clinical Assistant Visiting Neuro- 
Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1924, FrankHn; M.D. 1928, Northwestern. 
[1932; 1948]) 

THOMAS A. C. RENNIE, Professor of Psychiatry (Social Psychiatry). Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1924, University of Pittsburgh; M.D. 
1928, Harvard. [1942; 1950]) 

PAUL REZNIKOFF, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, New 
York Hospital; Consulting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1916, New York 
University; M.D. 1920, Cornell. [1924; 1946]) 

WILSON G. SMILLIE, Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. Con- 
sultant in Preventive Medicine and Public Health, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1908, Colorado College; M.D. 1912, D.P.H. 1916, Harvard. [1937]) 

CARL H. SMITH, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending Pediatrician, 
New York Hospital. (B.A. 1915, College of the City of New York; M.A. 1917, 
Columbia; M.D. 1922, Cornell. [1928; 1954]) 

LEO SROLE, Visiting Professor of Sociology (Social Psychiatry). (B.S. 1933, Har- 
vard; PhD. 1940, University of Chicago. [1952]) 

LEWIS D. STEVENSON, Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology) ; Associate 
Professor of Pathology. Consulting Pathologist, New York Hospital; Consulting 
Neurologist, New York Hospital, Westchester Division; Associate Visiting Neuro- 
Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1916, M.D. 1916, Queen's University. 
[1922; 1945]) 

PHILIP M. STIMSON, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Consulting Pediatrician, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1910, Yale; M.D. 1914, Cornell. [1919; 1953] 

HAROLD L. TEMPLE, Professor of Clinical Radiology. Attending Radiologist, 
New York Hospital. (B.S. 1932, M.D. 1935, University of Nebraska. [1941 ; 1946]) 

PRESTON A. WADE, Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, New York 
Hospital. (A.B. 1922, M.D. 1925, Cornell. [1927; 1953]) 

SYDNEY WTINTRAUB, Professor of Clinical Radiology. Attending Radiologist, 
New York Hospital. (M.D. 1918, Columbia. [1932; 1950]) 

MAY G. WILSON, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attending Pediatri- 
cian, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1911, Cornell. [1918; 1952]) 

PHILIP D. WILSON, Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). Attending Sur- 
geon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Surgeon-in-Chief, Hospital for Special 
Surgery. (A.B. 1909, M.D. 1912, Harvard. [1951]) 

HAROLD G. WOLFF, Professor of Medicine (Neurology) ; Associate Professor of 
Psychiatry. Attending Physician, Associate Attending Psychiatrist, New York Hos- 
pital; Consulting Neurologist, New York Hospital, Westchester Division; Chnical 
Assistant Visiting Neuro-Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1918, College of 
the City of New York; M.D. 1923, M.A. 1928, Har^'ard. [1931; 1948]) 

IRVING S. WRIGHT, Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physician, New 
York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1946; 1949]) 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

FRANK E. ADAIR, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1910, ScD. 1934, Marietta College; M.D. 1915, Johns 
Hopkins. [1934; 1938]) 

THOMAS P. ALMY, Associate Professor of Medicine. Associate Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital; Assistant Attending Physician, Memorial Hospital; 
Visiting Physician and Director, Second Medical Division, Bellevue Hospital. 
(A.B. 1935, M.D. 1939, Cornell. [1940; 1954]) 



FACULTY 11 

ARTHUR F. ANDERSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1916, Tufts. [1930; 1948]) 

JOSEPH F. ARTUSIO, Jr. Associate Professor of Surgery (Anesthesiology) ; As- 
sociate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Anesthesiology) . Attending 
Anesthesiologist-in-Charge, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1939, St. Peter's; M.D. 
1943, Cornell. [1946; 1953]) 

HORACE S. BALDWIN, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1917, Wesleyan University; M.D. 
1921, Cornell. [1923; 1947]) 

WILLIAM A. BARNES, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1933, College of the City of New York; 
M.D. 1937, Cornell. [1938; 1946]) 

HENRY L. BARNETT, Associate Professor of Pediatrics. Associate Attending Pedi- 
atrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1938, M.D., 1938, Washington University. 
[1946; 1950]) 

LEONA BAUMGARTNER, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine; Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. (A.B. 1923, M.A. 1925, 
Kansas; PhD. 1932, M.D. 1934, Yale. [1935; 1954]) 

JOHN M. BEAL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending Sur- 
geon, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1937, M.D. 1941, Chicago University. [1942; 
1953]) 

CHARLES M. BERRY, Associate Professor of Anatomy. (A.B. 1938, De Pauw; 
M.S. 1939, PhD. 1941, Northwestern. [1947; 1951]) 

ROY W. BONSNES, Associate Professor of Biochemistry; Associate Professor of 
Biochemistry in Obstetrics and Gynecology. (B.S. 1930, University of Connecti- 
cut; Ph.D. 1939, Yale. [1941; 1950]) 

HARRY W. BURNETT, Associate Professor of Radiology. Associate Attending 
Radiologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1940, Miami University; M.D. 1943, 
Northwestern University. [1948; 1953]) 

ANTHONY C. CIPOLLARO, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatol- 
ogy). Assistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1924, Dartmouth; 
M.D. 1927, Columbia. [1948; 1951]) 

BRADLEY L. COLEY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1915, Yale; M.D. 1919, Columbia. [1941; 1950]) 

HERBERT CONWAY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Plastic Surgery). 
Attending Surgeon in Charge of Plastic Surgery, New York Hospital; Visiting 
Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (M.B. 1928, B.S. 1929. M.D. 1929, M.S. 1932, Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati. [1932; 1946]) 

WILLIAM A. COOPER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, Stanford University; M.D. 1932, 
Cornell. [1934; 1946]) 

NELSON W. CORNELL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1918, M.D. 1921, Cornell. [1925; 1942]) 

HAROLD W. K. DARGEON, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Attending 
Pediatrician, Memorial Hospital. (M.D. 1922, Albany. [1947; 1951]) 

EDWARD H. DENNEN, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1919, Tufts. 
[1933; 1949]) 

J. LOUISE DESPERT, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attend- 
ing Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, Barnard; M.D. 1932, New York 
University. [1939; 1951]) 

JOHN W. DRAPER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). Associate 
Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Visiting Surgeon in Charge 
of Urological Service, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1927, Dartmouth; M.D. 1931, 
Cornell. [1932; 1949]) 



12 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

WILLIAM H. DUNN, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate Attend- 
ing Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, Rochester; M.D. 1927, Harv- 
ard. [1932; 1947]) 

HENRY S. DUNNING, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). As- 
sociate Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1927, M.D. 1930, Cor- 
nell. [1932; 1948]) 

JOHN H. ECKEL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. 
(B.S. 1929, New York University; M.D. 1933, Cornell. [1934; 1946]) 

GEORGE F. EGAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Dental Surgery). At- 
tending Dental Surgeon in Charge, New York Hospital. (D.M.D. 1931, Harvard. 
[1933; 1953]) 

RICHARD H. FREYBERG, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.D. 1930, M.S. 1934, 
University of Michigan. [1945]) 

RALPH W. GAUSE, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, Uni- 
versity of Texas; M.D. 1930, Harvard. [1935; 1954]) 

WILLIAM J. GRACE, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1938, St. Peter's College; M.D. 1942, 
Cornell. [1944; 1953]) 

KRISTIAN G. HANSSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Physical Medi- 
cine). Director of Physical Medicine, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1920, M.D. 1923, 
Cornell. [1925; 1948]) 

EDWIN T. HAUSER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1916, College of the City of New York; M.D. 
1922, Cornell. [1925; 1949]) 

EDWARD J. HEHRE, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology. (A.B. 
1934, M.D. 1937, Cornell. [1938; 1949]) 

GEORGE W. HENRY, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Attending Psychi- 
atrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1912, Wesleyan; M.D. 1916, Johns Hopkins. 
[1928; 1932]) 

CRANSTON W. HOLMAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital; Director, Second Surgical Division, Bellevue 
Hospital. [1932; 1953] 

CARL T. JAVERT, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. At- 
tending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1932, Buffalo. 
[1937; 1949]) 

MORTON C. KAHN, Associate Professor of Public Health and Preventive Med- 
icine. (B.S. 1916, Ph.D. 1924, Cornell; A.M. 1917, Columbia; ScD. 1938, Havana. 
[1919; 1934]) 

SAMUEL F. KELLEY, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology) . 
Attending Surgeon (Otolaryngology), New York Hospital. (M.D. 1921, Univer- 
sity of Texas. [1926; 19541) 

AARON KELLNER, Associate Professor of Pathology. Associate Attending Path- 
ologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1934, Yeshiva University; M.S. 1935, Colum- 
bia; M.D. 1939, University of Chicago. [1946; 1953]) 

MILTON L. KRAMER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.D. 1929, Columbia. [1935; 
1953]) 

ERNEST W. LAMPE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery; Assistant Professor of 
Clinical Anatomy. Assistant Attending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Visiting 
Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1920, University of Minnesota; M.D. 1923, 
Rush Medical School. [1941; 1953]) 



FACULTY 13 

HENRY D. LAUSON, Associate Professor of Physiology; Associate Professor of 
Physiology in Pediatrics. Assistant Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. 
(B.S. 1936, Ph.D. 1939, M.D. 1940, University of Wisconsin. [1950; 1951]) 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON LEIGHTON, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychi- 
atry. Associate Attending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, Princeton; 
M.A. 1934, Cambridge; M.D. 1936, Johns Hopkins. [1947; 1954]) 

MILTON I. LEVINE, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1923, College of the City of New 
York; M.D. 1927, Cornell. [1933; 1954]) 

FREDERICK L. LIEBOLT, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
Attending Surgeon in Charge of Orthopedics, New York Hospital; Attending 
Orthopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (A.B. 1925, LL.D. 1948, Uni- 
versity of Arkansas; M.D. 1930, Washington University; Sc.D. 1937, Columbia. 
[1939; 1946.]) 

MARY H. LOVELESS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Allergy). As- 
sistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1921, M.D. 1925, Stan- 
ford. [1939; 1948]) 

E. HUGH LUCKEY, Dean; Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1940, Union; M.D. 1944, Vander- 
bilt; Sc.D. 1954, Union. [1948; 1953]) 

JOHN MacLeod, Associate Professor of Anatomy; Assistant Professor of Physi- 
ology. (A.B. 1934, M.Sc. 1937, New York University; Ph.D. 1941, Cornell. [1941; 
1949]) 

GERVAIS W. McAULIFFE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngol- 
ogy). Attending Surgeon (Otolaryngology), New York Hospital. (M.D. 1920, 
Long Island College Hospital. [1926; 1942]) 

HOWARD S. McCANDLISH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1917, 
University of Virginia. [1921; 1949]) 

WALSH McDERMOTT, Associate Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1930, Princeton; M.D. 1934, Columbia. [1935; 1946]) 

CHARLES M. McLANE, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital; Assistant Attend- 
ing Radiologist (Obstetrics and Gynecology), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1924, 
M.D. 1928, Johns Hopkins. [1932; 1949]) 

ALLISTER M. McLELLAN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 
Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Attending Urologist, New 
York Hospital, Westchester Division. (M.D. 1924, McGill. [1932; 1948]) 

VICTOR F. MARSHALL, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). At- 
tending Surgeon in Charge of Urology, New York Hospital; Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (M.D. 1937, University of Virginia. [1938; 1946]) 

HAYES E. MARTIN, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1911, M.D. 1917, Iowa. [1941; 1950]) 

DONALD B. MELVILLE, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. (B.S. 1936, M.S. 
1937, Ph.D. 1939, University of Illinois. [1944; 1948]) 

ADE T. MILHORAT, Associate Professor of Medicine in Psychiatry; Associate Pro- 
fessor of Psychiatry. Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1924, Co- 
lumbia; M.D. 1928, Cornell. [1933; 1951]) 

WALTER MODELL, Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (B.S. 1928, 
College of the City of New York; M.D. 1932, Cornell. [1932; 1954]) 

JAMES A, MOORE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Otolaryngology) . At- 
tending Surgeon in Charge of Otolaryngology, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1930, 
Davidson College; M.D. 1934, Harvard. ^941 ; 1948]) 



14 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

S. W. MOORE, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, New 
York Hospital; Assistant Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1926, David- 
son; M.D. 1930, Harvard. [1932; 1946]) 

GEORGE E. MURPHY, Associate Professor of Pathology. Assistant Attending 
Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1939, University of Kansas; M.D. 1943, 
University of Pennsylvania. [1953; 1954]) 

CARL MUSCHENHEIM, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital, (A.B. 1928, M.D. 1931, Columbia. [1933; 1946]) 

JOSEPH N. NATHANSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecol- 
ogy. Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (M.D. CM. 
1919, McGill. [1926; 1951]) 

WILLIAM F. NICKEL, Jr. Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate At- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hos- 
pital. (A.B. 1930, M.D. 1934, Johns Hopkins. [1935; 1950]) 

THEODORE W. OPPEL, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.A. 1927, Wisconsin; M.D. 1929, Penn- 
sylvania. [1923; 1951]) 

GEORGE T. PACK, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Attending Surgeon, 
Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1920, Ohio State; M.D. 1922, Yale. [1935; 1950]) 

HAROLD E. B. PARDEE, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1906, M.D. 1909, Columbia. [1917; 
1926]). 

HERBERT PARSONS, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). As- 
sociate Attending Surgeon (Neurosurgery), New York Hospital; Associate Visit- 
ing Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Yale; M.D. 1935, Harvard. [1938; 
1954]) 

RUSSELL H. PATTERSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate At- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 
1914, Georgia; M.D. 1918, Harvard. [1921; 1946]) 

RALPH F. PHILLIPS, Associate Professor of Radiology. Associate Attending Radia- 
tion Therapist, Memorial Hospital. (B.S.M.B. 1928, M.S. 1930, University of 
London; D.M.R.E. 1933, Royal College of England. [1950; 1951]) 

JULIAN R. RACHELE, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. (B.A. 1934, M.S. 1935, 
Ph.D. 1939, New York University. [1940; 1948]) 

GEORGE G. READER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1940, M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1946; 1953]) 

HENRY B. RICHARDSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital, Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1910, 
M.D. 1914, Harvard. [1924; 1932]) 

WALTER F. RIKER, Associate Professor of Pharmacology. (B.S. 1939, Columbia; 
M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1941; 1950]) 

SIDNEY ROTHBARD, Associate Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Colgate; M.D. 1935, Rochester. [1951]) 

NELSON B. SACKETT, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1917, Prince- 
ton; M.D. 1923, Columbia. [1932; 1954]) 

ROBERT S. SHERMAN, Associate Professor of Radiology. Attending Roentgenol- 
ogist, Memorial Hospital. (Ph.B. 1931, Brown; M.D. 1935, Harvard. [1947; 
1951]) 

EPHRAIM SHORR, Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology). Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, M.D. 1922, Yale. [1926; 1942]) 

DONALD J. SIMONS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Neuro-Psychiatrist, Belle- 
vue Hospital. (A.B. 1927, Brown; M.D. 1931, Harvard. [1939; 1948]) 



FACULTY 15 

FRANK R. SMITH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital; Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1917, Yale; M.D. 1921, Harvard. [1932; 
1950]) 

RICHMOND STEPHENS, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). 
Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attending Orthopedic 
Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (B.S. 1911, M.D. 1913, Columbia. [1951]) 

HAROLD J. STEWART, Associate Professor of Medicine. Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1915, M.D. 1919, A.M. 1923, Johns Hopkins. [1932]) 

JOHN Y. SUGG, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology. (B.S. 1926, 
Ph.D. 1931, Vanderbilt. [1932; 1943]) 

HENRY J. TAGNON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital; Associate Attending Physician, Memorial Hospital. 
(B.S. 1931, Liege; M.D. 1936, Brussels. [1947; 1948]) 

T. CAMPBELL THOMPSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ortho- 
pedics). Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attending Or- 
thopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (A.B. 1924, Rollins; M.D. 1928, 
Johns Hopkins; M.Sc.D. 1936, Columbia. [1951]) 

ALPHONSE E. TIMPANELLI, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant 
Attending Physician, New York Hospital; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. 
(A.B. 1932, Columbia; M.D. 1936, Cornell. [1938; 1953]) 

EDWARD TOLSTOI, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, Yale; M.D. 1923, Cornell. [1927; 1947]) 

RALPH R. TOMPSETT, Associate Professor of Medicine. Associate Attending 
Physician , New York Hospital. (A.B. 1934, M.D. 1939, Cornell. [1947; 1952]) 

JANET TRAVELL, Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (A.B. 1922, 
Wellesley; M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1930; 1947]) 

NORMAN L. TREVES, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1915, A.M. 1916, Wabash College; M.D. 
1920, Johns Hopkins. [1948; 1953]) 

LEWIS C. WAGNER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). At- 
tending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attending Orthopedic Sur- 
geon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (A.B. 1916, Georgetown; M.D. 1920, Johns 
Hopkins. [1951]) 

JAMES H. WALL, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Medical Director, 
New York Hospital, Westchester Division. (M.D. 1927, Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege. [1933; 1946]) 

ROBERT F. WATSON, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1934, University of Virginia. [1946; 1950]) 

BRUCE P. WEBSTER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (M.D.C.M. 1925, McGill. [1932; 1947]) 

LIVINGSTON WELCH, Associate Professor of Psychology. (A.B. 1931, M.A. 1932, 
Ph.D. 1935, Columbia. [1947; 1952]) 

JOHN P. WEST, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attending Sur- 
geon, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1927, Alabama Polytechnic Institute; M.D. 
1932, Cornell. [1938; 1954]) 

CHARLES H. WHEELER, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital; Assistant Attending Physician, Memorial 
Hospital. (B.S. 1931, Princeton; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1936; 1953]) 

WILLET F. WHITMORE, Jr., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1938, Rutgers; M.D. 1942, Cornell. [1943; 
1953]) 



16 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

BYARD WILLIAMS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital; Attending Physician, New York Hospital, West- 
chester Division; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1926, Williams; 
M.D. 1930, Columbia. [1933; 1953]) 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

HAROLD B. ADAMS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1917, Columbia; M.D. 1920, Cornell. 
[1934; 1944]) 

ANDREW J. AKELAITIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). 
Assistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital; Clinical Assistant Visiting 
Neuro-Psychiatrist, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1925, M.D. 1929, Johns Hopkins. 
[1947]) 

SILVIO BAEZ, Assistant Professor of Medicine. (B.S. 1936, M.D. 1943, National 
Asuncion Medical School, Paraguay. [1948; 1952]) 

IRVIN BALENSWEIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). At- 
tending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1915, College of the 
City of New York; M.D. 1918, Cornell. [1920; 1934]) 

THOMAS L. BALL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1936, M.D. 1939, Cornell. [1948; 1953]) 

STANLEY J. BEHRMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Dental Surgery). 
Associate Attending Dental Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1942, New York 
University; D.D.S. 1945, University of Pittsburgh. [1948; 1953]) 

SAMUEL R. BERENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Pre- 
ventive Medicine; Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Amherst; M.D. 1935, University 
of Vermont. [1947; 1951]) 

BEATRICE B. BERLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. (A.B. 1923, Vassar; M.A. 1924, Columbia; M.D. 1938, New York Uni- 
versity. [1946; 1950]) 

LOUIS BERLIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). (A.B. 1934, 
University of Illinois; M.D. 1941, Chicago Medical School. [1952; 1953]) 

OTTO E. BILLO, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. (A.B. 1930, Williams; 
M.D. 1935, Harvard. [1947; 1954]) 

KEEVE BRODMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (B.S. 1927, College 
of the City of New York; M.D. 1931, Cornell. [1938; 1950]) 

IRWIN D. J. BROSS, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 
(Vital Statistics). (B.A. 1942, University of North CaroHna; M.S. 1948, North 
Carolina State College; Ph.D. 1949, University of North Carolina. [1952]) 

JACOB BUCKSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Visiting Roentgen- 
ologist, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1911, College of the City of New York; M.D. 
1915, Cornell. [1927; 1940]) 

KATHERINE BUTLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital; Assistant Visiting Physician, Bellevue 
Hospital. (A.B. 1920, Mt. Holyoke; M.A. 1926, Columbia; M.D. 1935, Cornell. 
[1938; 1951]) 

JUSTIN T. CALLAHAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1939, M.D. 1943, Columbia University. [1947; 1953]) 

FRANK G. CARPENTER, Assistant Professor of Physiology. (B.S. 1948, Ohio 
State University; Ph.D. 1951, Columbia. [1954]) 

HENRY A. CARR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Princeton; M.D. 1935, Cornell. [1947; 
1950]) 



FACULTY 17 

ANNE C. CARTER, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital. (A.B. 1941, Wellesley; M.D. 1944, Cornell. [1945; 1952]) 

AARON D. CHAVES, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine; Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1931, William and Mary; M.D. 1935, New York 
University. [1946; 1951]) 

EUGENE E. CLIFFTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital; Clinical Assistant in Surgery, Memorial Hos- 
pital. (B.S. 1933, Lafayette College; M.D. 1937, Yale Medical School. [1938; 
1953]) 

CLEMENT B. P. COBB, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1922, Williams; M.D. 1926, Har- 
vard. [1934; 1944]) 

JOHN R. COBB, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). Associate 
Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital. Attending Orthopedic 
Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (A.B. 1925, Brown University; M.D. 
1930, Yale; Med.Sc.D. 1936, Columbia. [1951]) 

EUGENE J. COHEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (B.A. 1933, M.S. 1934, Wisconsin; M.D. 1938, 
Cornell. [1940; 1952]) 

JOHN T. COLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. Associ- 
ate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1936, 
Duke; M.D. 1940, University of Maryland. [1941 ; 1951]) 

.\RTHUR D. CONSOLE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Neurosurgery), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1937, 
Cornell; M.D. 1941, Cornell. [1944; 1951]) 

WILLIAM COOPER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). As- 
sociate Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attending Ortho- 
pedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (B.S. 1929, New York University 
M.D. 1933, Long Island College [1951]) 

FRANK E. CORMIA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Dermatology) 
Assistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1926, M.D. 1930, Uni 
versity of Vermont. [1946; 1948]) 

ROBERT L. CRAIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology 
Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.S 
1923, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1932; 1949]) 

HELEN E. DANIELLS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Assistant At 
tending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1937, Barnard; M.D. 1941 
Cornell. [1945; 1953]) 

MARGARET DANN, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. Associate Attending Pedia^ 
trician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1923, Oberlin; M.S. 1925, IlHnois; Ph.D 
1932, Cornell; M.D. 1937, Yale. [1938; 1945]) 

MICHAEL R. DEDDISH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate At 
tending Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1933, M.D. 1937, Ohio State Uni- 
versity, [1942; 1951]) 

PAUL F. DE GARA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics (Allergy). Assistant 
Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1926, University of Heidel- 
berg; M.D. 1927, University of Padua. [1941; 1950]) 

PETER G. DENKER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Neurology). As- 
sociate Visiting Neuro-Psychiatrist, Bellcvue Hospital. (B.S. 1923, College of the 
City of New York; M.D. 1927, Cornell. [1932; 1941]) 

HENRY D. DIAMOND, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate At- 
tending Physician, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1941, M.D. 1944, University of 
Louisville. [1947; 1952]) 



18 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

JAMES A. DINGWALL, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant At- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital; Assistant Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hos- 
pital. (A.B. 1936, Dartmouth; M.D. 1940, Cornell. [1941; 1946]) 

SAMUEL W. DOOLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1934, Illinois Wesleyan Uni- 
versity; M.D. 1938, Johns Hopkins. [1940; 1954]) 

ROBERT O. Dubois, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1915, M.D. 1919, Columbia. [1923; 
1940]) 

HOWARD S. DUNBAR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Neurosurgery). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Neurosurgery), New York Hospital; Assistant 
Visiting Neurosurgeon, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1941, M.D. 1944, Cornell. 
[1949; 1953]) 

EDWARD A. DUNLAP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Opthalmology) . 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Ophthalmology), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1932, 
Westminster; M.D. 1935, Western Reserve. [1945; 1948]) 

HOWARD A. EDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1938, University of Wisconsin; M.D. 1942, 
M.P.H. 1945, Harvard. [1950; 1954]) 

HERBERT R. EDWARDS, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. (M.D. 1918, College of Medical Evangelists. [1942]) 

HELENE ELIASBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1919, University of Berlin. 
[1943; 1948]) 

JOHN T. ELLIS, Assistant Professor of Pathology; Assistant Professor of Patho- 
logy in Surgery. Assistant Attending Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1942, University of Texas; M.D. 1945, Northwestern. [1948; 1950]) 

MARY A. ENGLE, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. Assistant Attending Pedia- 
trician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1942, Baylor University; M.D. 1945, Johns 
Hopkins. [1948; 1954]) 

RALPH L. ENGLE, Jr. Assistant Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Physi- 
cian, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1942, University of Florida; M.D. 1945, Johns 
Hopkins. [1949; 1952]) 

NATHAN EPSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1922, M.I.T.; Ph. D. 1928, Colum- 
bia; M.D. 1934, Munich. [1946; 1952]) 

ALBERT J. ERDMANN, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate 
Visiting Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1933, Yale; M.D. 1937, Harvard. 
[1940; 1953]) 

HOLLON W. FARR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1939, Yale; M.D. 1942, Harvard. [1953; 
1953]) 

JOSEPH H. FARROW, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1926, M.D. 1930, University of Virginia. 
[1950; 1951]) 

AARON FEDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1938, University of Maryland. [1941; 
1950]) 

GEORGE A. FIEDLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). As- 
sociate Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1923, Wis- 
consin; M.D. 1925, Pennsylvania. [1950]) 

WILLIAM F. FINN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1936, Holy Cross; M.D. 1940, Cornell. [1942; 1948]) 



FACULTY 19 

ELIZABETH F. FOCHT, Assistant Professor of Radiology (Physics). Associate 
Attending Physicist, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1935, Barnard. [1947; 1951]) 

WILLIAM T. FOLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1933, Columbia; M.D. 1937, Cornell. 
[1946; 1951]) 

FRANKLIN M. FOOTE, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. (B.S. 1930, M.D. 1933, D.P.H. 1935, Yale. [1941]) 

LEWIS M. FRAAD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1935, University of Vienna. [1945; 
1949]) 

JOHN E. FRANKLIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital; Assistant Attending Pediatrician, Memorial 
Hospital. (B.S. 1928, Notre Dame; M.D. 1932, Harvard. [1947; 1948]) 

ALAN W. ERASER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry in Pediatrics; As- 
sistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Assistant Attending Psychiatrist, Assist- 
ant Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1939, Bard College; 
M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1945; 1954]) 

EDGAR L. FRAZELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1929, M.D. 1931, University of Texas. 
[1950]) 

CONSTANCE FRIESS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, Barnard; M.D. 1932, 
Cornell. [1933; 1944]) 

SOLOMON GARB, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacology. (A.B. 1940, 
M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1949; 1953]) 

HAROLD GENVERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital. (D.D.S. 1932, Pennsylvania; M.D., 1936, 
Yale. [1937; 1950]) 

WILLIAM A. GEOHEGAN, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. (E.E. 1929, M.D. 
1941, Cornell. [1941; 1944]) 

RANDOLPH GEPFERT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology, Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hos- 
pital. (M.D. 1929, University of Georgia. [1941; 1951]) 

HELENA GILDER, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry; Assistant Professor of 
Surgery (Biochemistry) . (A.B. 1935, Vassar; M.D. 1940, Cornell. [1947; 1953]) 

WILLIAM P. GIVEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1941, Harvard; M.D. 1944, Cornell. [1946; 1952]) 

OSCAR CLASSMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 
1923, University of Utah; M.D. 1925, New York University. [1946; 1951]) 

MARTIN J. GLYNN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Fordham; M.D. 1935, Long 
Island College. [1939; 1943]) 

HENRY P. GOLDBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1932, M.D. 1936, Johns Hop- 
kins. [1946; 1950]) 

DAN M. GORDON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Ophthalmology), New York Hospital. (B.S. 1929, 
M.D. 1932, Michigan. [1945; 1948]) 

ARTHUR V. GREELEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecol- 
ogy. Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. 
(B.S. 1925, Yale; M.D. 1929, Johns Hopkins. [1932; 1949]) 



20 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

SIDNEY M. GREENBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate 
Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1925, M.D. 1928, Cornell. [1934; 
1950]) 

THEODORE C. GREENE, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. (A.B. 1920, M.D. 
1924, Harvard. [1951]) 

ROGER L. GREIF, Assistant Professor of Physiology. (B.S. 1937, Haverford; 
M.D. 1941, Johns Hopkins. [1953]) 

AUGUST H. GROESCHEL, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. (A.B. 1927, Holy Cross College; M.D. 1931, M.S. 1937, Columbia 
University. [1952; 1954]) 

SUSAN J. HADLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (A.B. 1941, Wis- 
consin; M.D. 1944, Cornell. [1946; 1952]) 

WILBUR D. HAGAMEN, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. (B.S. 1945, Baldwin- 
Wallace College; M.D. 1951, Cornell. [1949; 1953]) 

FRANCIS J. HAMILTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate 
Attending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, St. Joseph's College; 
M.D. 1933, Jefferson. [1940; 1949]) 

LAWRENCE W. HANLON, Assistant Dean; Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
(A.B. 1935, M.D. 1938, Cornell. [1946; 1948]) 

JAMES Q. HARALAMBIE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant 
Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, Oberlin; M.D. 1935, 
Yale. [1939; 1949]) 

HELEN HARRINGTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B., M.A. 1916, University of Den- 
ver; M.D. Johns Hopkins. [1933; 1944]) 

RICHARD L. HARRIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. (M.D. 1920, 
University of Georgia. [1951]) 

MILTON HELPERN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Visit- 
ing Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1922, College of the City of New York 
M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1931; 1940]) 

NORMAN L. HIGINBOTHAM, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate 
Attending Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (M.D.C.M. 1926, McGill. [1940 
1950]) 

LAWRENCE E. HINKLE, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (A.B 
1938, University of North Carolina; M.D. 1942, Harvard. [1947; 1951]) 

ELLIOT HOCHSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant At 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1928, Columbia; M.D. 1932 
New York University. [1952; 1953]) 

EVELYN HOLT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, Wellesley; M.A. 1921, M.D. 1924 
Cornell. [1926; 1952]) 

GUSTAVUS A. HUMPHREYS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urol 
ogy). Assistant Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Associate 
Visiting Surgeon (Urology), Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1927, Princeton; M.D 
1932, Columbia. [1937; 1946]) 

FREDERICK C. HUNT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate At 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1924, Western Ontario, 
[1932; 1940]) 

GERALD R. JAMEISON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1918, Albany Medical College. [1933 
1936]) 

GEORGE JASPIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. Associate Attending 
Radiologist in Charge of School of Radiology, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1932, 
Columbia; M.D. 1936, Michigan. [1945; 1948]) 



I 



FACULTY 21 

D. REES JENSEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1925, Columbia. [1928; 1949]) 

DONALD G. JOHNSON, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Asso- 
ciate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.A. 1936, 
Maine; M.D. 1940, Yale. [1942; 1948]) 

EDMUND N. JOYNER, HI, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant 
Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1927, Virginia Military Insti- 
tute; M.D. 1932, Cornell. [1934; 1948]) 

WILLLA.M H. KAMMERER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant 
Attending Physician, New York Hospital; Assistant Visiting Physician, Bellevue 
Hospital. (B.S. 1931, M.D. 1935, University of Indiana. [1941; 1953]) 

GEORGE L. KAUER, Jr., Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate 
Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 1933, New York University; M.D. 
1937, Cornell. [1938; 1949]) 

JOSEPH T. KAUER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. 

B. H. KEAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine (Tropical Medicine) ; As- 
sistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive Medicine (Parasitol- 
ogy). Assistant Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1933, Univer- 
sity of California (Berkeley); M.D. 1937, Columbia. [1952; 1954]) 

LeMOYNE C. KELLY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. (A.B. 1924, 
University of Rochester; M.D. 1929, Cornell. [1935; 1954]) 

ANN P. KENT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology; As- 
sistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive Medicine. Assistant 
Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1930, 
George Washington University; M.D. 1933, University of Maryland; M.P.H. 
1939, Johns Hopkins. [1950; 1954]) 

SEYMOUR G. KLEBANOFF, Assistant Professor of Psychology. (A.B. 1937, 
M.S. 1939, Yale; Ph.D. 1947, Northwestern. [1950]) 

MARGARET KLUMPP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1928, Tufts; M.D. 1932, Cornell. 
[1950; 1951]) 

HEDWIG KOENIG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant Attend- 
ing Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1918, Barnard: M.A. 1920, 
Columbia; M.D. 1929, Johns Hopkins. [1935; 1944]) 

RICHARD N. KOHL, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. Assistant Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1938, M.D. 1942, University of Cin- 
cinnati. [1945: 1950]) 

BARBARA M. KORSCH, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. .Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1941, Smith; M.D. 1944, Johns Hop- 
kins. [1947; 1952]) 

HERBERT KOTEEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1935, University of Wisconsin; 
M.D. 1939, Johns Hopkins. [1943; 1953]) 

ELMER E. KRAMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
.Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.S, 
1935, M.D. 1938, Tulane. [1946: 1952]) 

NORMAN KRETCHMER, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Pediatrics. (B.S. 
1944, Cornell; M.S. 1945, Ph.D. 1947, Minnesota; M.D. 1952, New York State 
University. [1953]) 

JOHN S. LaDUE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. .Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. Associate Attending Physician, Memorial Hos- 
pital. (B.S. 1932, M.S. 1940, Ph.D. 1941, University of Minnesota; M.D. 1936, 
Harvard. [1947; 1948]) 



22 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

MICHAEL LAKE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, M.D. 1922, Cornell. [1926; 1953]) 

NORVELLE C. LaMAR, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate At- 
tending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1921, M.D. 1925, Indiana. 
[1932; 1942]) 

ROBERT LANDESMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecol- 
ogy. Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. 
(A.B. 1936, Columbia; M.D. 1939, Cornell. [1949; 1954]) 

RICHARD E. LEE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine; Assistant Professor 
of Clinical Public Health and Preventive Medicine. (B.S. 1939, University of 
Massachusetts; M.A. 1940, Ph.D. 1942, Harvard; M.D. 1947, Columbia. 
[1950; 1954]) 

CHARLES A. LeMAISTER, Assistant Professor of Medicine. (A.B. 1944, Uni- 
versity of Alabama; M.D. 1947, Cornell. [1948, 1953]) 

LEON I. LEVINE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital; Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (B.S. 
1918, College of the City of New York; M.D. 1922, Cornell. [1924; 1939]) 

ALLYN B. LEY, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Physician, 
New York Hospital; Assistant Attending Physician, Memorial Hospital; As- 
sistant Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1939, Dartmouth; M.D. 1942, 
Columbia. [1947; 1953]) 

SOL S, LIGHTMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1918, College of the City of New 
York; M.D. 1921, Cornell. [1943; 1947]) 

MACK LIPKIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1926, College of the City of New York; 
M.D. 1930, Cornell. [1953]) 

EDWARD J. LORENZE, III, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine {Physical 
Medicine). (M.D. 1946, New York University. [1953]) 

DANIEL S. LUKAS, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Phy- 
sician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1944, M.D. 1947, Columbia. [1948; 1953]) 

BERNARD MAISEL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attend- 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1936, M.D. 1940, Johns Hopkins. 
[1945; 1953]) 

BENJAMIN E. MARBURY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery {Anesthesiol- 
ogy); Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology {Anesthesiol- 
ogy). Assistant Attending Anesthesiologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1939, | 
B.S. 1942, Missouri University; M.S. 1941, Louisiana State University; M.D. j 
1944, Washington University, St. Louis. [1948; 1953]) 

KIRBY A. MARTIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- I 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1922, Washington University, St. 
Louis. [1927; 1953]) 

ABRAHAM MAZUR, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine. (B.S. 
1932, College of the City of New York; M.A. 1934, Ph.D. 1938, Columbia. 
[1941; 1949]) I 

JOHN L. McCLENAHAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. Assistant | 
Attending Radiologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1937, Yale; M.D. 1941, | 
University of Pennsylvania. [1949; 1953]) ; 

RICHARD R. McCORMACK, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant 
Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1937, Columbia; M.D. 1941, 
Cornell. [1946; 1953]) 

FRANK J. McGOWAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attend- i 
ing Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, M.D. 1921, Columbia. [1932; I 
1950]) i 



FACULTY 23 

FREDERICK C. McLELLAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital; Attending Urol- 
ogist, New York Hospital, Westchester Division. (B.S. 1929, M.D. 1933, Dal- 
housie; M.S. 1936, Michigan. [1941; 1948]) 

GORDON P. McNEER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (M.D. 1931, University of Pennsylvania. 
[1950; 1951]) 

ROBERT H. MELCHIONNA, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant 
Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1929, St. John's Univer- 
sity; M.D. 1935, St. Louis University. [1939; 1953]) 

CURTIS L. MENDELSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. 
(A.B. 1934, Michigan; M.D. 1938, Cornell. [1947]) 

ANNE E. MILMAN, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry in Psychiatry. (A.B. 
1942, Adelphi College; A.M. 1945, Vassar; Ph.D. 1949, Yale. [1950; 1954]) 

LAURENCE MISCx\LL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Visiting Surgeon, 
Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1926, M.D. 1930, Cornell. [1942; 1947]) 

CHARLES T. OLCOTT, Assistant Professor of Pathology. Associate Attending 
Pathologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1911, Princeton; M.D. 1916, Cornell. 
[1926; 1943]) 

PHILIP OLLSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. (M.D. 1927, Long Island College of Medicine. [1944; 1950]) 

CHARLES H. O'REGAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Associate At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1919, St. Francis Xavier; M.D. 
1928, McGill. [1932; 1944]) 

WARD D. O'SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant At- 
tending Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1938, Fordham; M.D. 1942, Cor- 
nell. [1943; 1951]) 

ROBERT L. PATTERSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthope- 
dics). Associate Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attend- 
ing Orthopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. (A.B. 1928, University of 
Georgia; M.D. 1932, Harvard. [1951]) 

MARY ANN PAYNE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attend- 
ing Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1935, Hood; M.A. 1941, Ph.D. 1943, 
Wisconsin; M.D. 1945, Cornell. [1946; 1952]) 

T. ARTHUR PEARSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. Assistant 
Attending Radiologist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1930, Gustavus Adolphus; 
M.A. 1934, M.D. 1935, University of Minnesota.. [1948; 1949]) 

NORMAN PLUMMER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant At- 
tending Physician, New York Hospital; Associate Visiting Physician, Bellevue 
Hospital. (A.B. 1922, University of California: M.D. 1926, Cornell. [1928; 
1941]) 

J. LAWRENCE POOL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Associate Attend- 
ing Surgeon, Memorial Hospital. (B.S. 1930, Princeton; M.D. 1934, Columbia. 
[1948]) 

CURTIS T. PROUT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Assistant Medical 
Director and Clinical Director, New York Hospital, Westchester Division. (A.B. 
1921, M.D. 1924, Cornell; M.S. 1930, University of Michigan. [1948; 1951]) 

JOSEPH E. RALL, Assistant Professor of Medicine. Assistant Attending Physician, 
Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1940, North Central College; M.S. 1944, M.D. 1945, 
Northwestern University; Ph.D. 1952, University of Minnesota. [1951; 1953]) 

JOSEPH F. REILLY, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. (A.B. 1937, University 
of Illinois: M.A. 1939, Harvard; Ph.D. 1947, University of Chicago. [1948; 
1953]) 



24 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

EDGAR A. RILEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant Attending 
Physician, New York Hospital. (M.D. 1944, Columbia. [1952; 1954]) 

PETER C. RIZZO, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics) . Asso- 
ciate Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital; Attending Ortho- 
pedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery. [M.D. 1926, Bellevue]) 

FRED V. ROCKWELL, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Associate At- 
tending Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1931, M.D. 1936, Rochester. 
[1939; 1946]) 

DAVID E. ROGERS, Assistant Professor of Medicine. (M.D. 1948, Cornell. 
[1950; 1954]) 

GEORGE SCHAEFER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 
1933, New York University; M.D. 1937, Cornell. [1951: 1954]) 

JOHN G. SCHMIDT, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). Asso- 
ciate Attending Surgeon (Orthopedics), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1925, Wil- 
liams; M.D. 1930, Harvard. [1939; 1946]) 

IRVING SCHULMAN, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. Assistant Attending 
Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1942, M.D. 1945, New York Univer- 
sity. [1950; 1954]) 

JOHN F. SEYBOLT, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. (B.S. 1938, Yale: M.D. 
1943, Cornell. [1947; 1951]) 

MARY J. SHERFEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Assistant Attend- 
ing Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1940, M.D. 1943, Indiana Univer- 
sity. [1946; 1953]) 

ERWIN FLETCHER SMITH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and 
Gynecology. Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hos- 
pital. (A.B. 1924, M.D. 1928, University of Texas. [1934; 1954]) 

J. JAMES SMITH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Associate Visiting 
Physician, Bellevue Hospital. (A.B. 1934, St. Peters; M.D. 1938, Cornell [1939; 
1946]) 

CHARLES T. SNYDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology. Associate Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, New York Hos- 
pital. (M.D. 1921, New York University. [1927: 1954]) 

STUART S. SNYDER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthalmology). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Ophthalmology), New York Hospital. (B.Sc. 
1941, York College; M.D. 1944, University of Nebraska. [1947; 1951]) 

RICHARD B. STARK, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Plastic Surgery). 
Assistant Attending Surgeon (Plastic Surgery), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1936, 
Stanford; M.D. 1941, Cornell. [1950; 1952]) 

ISRAEL STEINBERG, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Radiology. Assistant Attending Physician, New York Hos- 
pital; Assistant Attending Radiologist (Angiocardiography), New York Hos- 
pital. (B.S. 1924, M.D. 1928, Harvard. [1940; 1949]) 

LEE R. STRAUB, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Orthopedics). (A.B. 
1940, Fordham; M.D. 1943, Cornell. [1951; 1954]) 

WILLIAM D. STUBENBORD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant 
Attending Physician, New York Hospital: Associate Visiting Physician, Bellevue 
Hospital. (B.S. 1927, Wesleyan University; M.D. 1931, Cornell. [1933; 1953]) 

ARTHUR M. SUTHERLAND, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. Assistant 
Attending Physician, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1932, Yale; M.D. 1936, Colum- 
bia. [1937; 1951]) 

JOHN E. SUTTON, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery. Assistant Attending 
Surgeon, New York Hospital: Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital. 
(A.B. 1915, A.M. 1917, M.D. 1920, Cornell. [1923; 1950]) 



GENERAL STATEMENT 25 

ROY C. SWAN, Assistant Professor of Physiology. (A.B. 1941, M.D. 1947, Cor- 
nell. [1948; 1953]) 

JOHN H. TRAVIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. (M.B. 1911, Uni- 
versity of Toronto. [1941; 1945]) 

RICHARD C. TROUTMAN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Ophthal- 
mology). (A.B. 1943, M.D. 1945, Ohio State University. [1951; 1954]) 

FRANCIS P. TWINEM, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery (Urology). Asso- 
ciate Attending Surgeon (Urology), New York Hospital. (A.B. 1917, Wooster 
College; M.A. 1919, Princeton; M.D. 1925, Harvard. [1950]) 

WILLIAM L. WATSON, Assistant Professor of Clinical- Surgery. Attending Sur- 
geon, Memorial Hospital. (A.B. 1922, M.D. 1925, Cornell. [1940; 1950]) 

WILLIS M. WEEDEN, Assistant Professor of Clinical Public Health and Preven- 
tive Medicine. Assistant Attending Surgeon, New York Hospital. (A.B. 1916, 
M.D. 1919, Cornell. [1922; 1950]) 

ARTHUR WEIDER, Assistant Professor of Psychology (Social Psychiatry). (A.B. 
1940, Ph.D. 1946, New York University; M.A. 1941, Columbia. [1942; 1953]) 

EXIE E. WELSCH, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. Assistant Attending 
Psychiatrist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1930; M.D. 1932, University of Indiana. 
[1949]) 

LOUIS E. WEYMULLER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant At- 
tending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (B.Sc. 1923, M.D. 1925, University of 
Nebraska. [1936; 1949]) 

MARJORIE A. WHEATLEY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Assistant 
Attending Pediatrician, New York Hospital. (.A..B. 1919, Vassar; M.D. 1929, 
Columbia. [1931; 1945]) 

STEPHEN WHITE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Radiology. Associate xA.ttending 
Radiologist, New York Hospital. (B.S. 1920, College of the City of New York: 
M.D. 1924, Cornell. [1931; 1944]) 

HOMER C. WICK, Jr., Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine. (M.D. 1945, Johns Hopkins; M.P.H. 1949, Harvard. [1952; 1953]) 

HAROLD N. WILLARD, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Preventive 
Medicine, (A.B. 1939, Yale; M.D. 1943, Johns Hopkins. [1951]) 



General Statement 



HISTORY^ 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY Medical College was established by the 
Board of Trustees of Cornell University on April 14, 1898, when 
they elected Dr. William M. Polk Director of the College and Dean of 
the Medical Faculty and appointed six professors. The Medical College 
was made possible by the munificence of Colonel Oliver H. Payne, who 
provided the funds for the erection of the original building, located at 
28th Street and First Avenue, and who pledged his support to the new 
institution. For several years he provided funds for the annual support 
of the college and later placed the institution on a secure foundation by 
making generous provision for its permanent endowmt^nt by a gift of 
over four million dollars. 



26 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

In October, 1898, instruction began in temporaiy quarters. As the 
Medical College admitted a number of students to advanced standing, 
Cornell University granted the degree of Doctor of Medicine for the 
first time in 1899. 

The Cornell University Medical College from its foundation has un- 
dertaken to carry out two allied activities: the development of physicians 
of the best type and the extension of medical knowledge by means of re- 
search. The Medical Faculty has held from the beginning of its existence 
the attitude that these two functions are necessary as constituting a true 
university school. It is committed not only to conduct teaching of high 
order but also to study disease and the sciences underlying medicine with 
the purpose of adding to medical knowledge. 

THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL-CORNELL 
MEDICAL COLLEGE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University Medical College and the New York Hospital 
have been cooperating for a long time in an arrangement for medical 
teaching. In September, 1932, however, the two institutions took up 
occupancy in the same plant. 

The New York Hospital was founded by Royal Charter on June 13, 
1771, in the reign of King George III, and has stood throughout the life 
of the nation as one of the foremost hospitals in the United States, as an 
institution rendering service to the sick and injured, and as a center of 
medical education. For a number of years the Hospital and the Medical 
College had been partially affiliated. In June, 1927, an agreement was 
entered into between Cornell University and the New York Hospital by 
which the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical College Association was 
formed for the purpose of bringing together their facilities and cooper- 
ating in the care of patients, in medical education, and in medical re- 
search. In order to harmonize the interests of the Hospital and of the 
Medical College, the Joint Administrative Board was formed, consisting 
of three representatives of each institution and a seventh member elected 
by the Hospital and by the University. 

Additional endowment was secured by each institution. A group of 
buildings was erected along the East River between 68th and 71st 
Streets, adjoining the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. The 
new plant affords separate buildings for each of the various laboratory 
departments and includes approximately 1,182 hospital beds. Provision 
is made for medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, and 
psychiatry in five distinct clinical units. 

The Faculty of the Medical College and the professional staflf of the 
Hospital are organized so as to form one body established on a university 
basis. 

The new plant affords very favorable conditions for the conduct of 



GENERAL STATEMENT 27 

medical education, for the pursuit of medical research, and for the care 
of patients in all phases of medical practice. 

FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

From the point of view of medical instruction, the facilities provided 
by the plant of the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical College Associa- 
tion are in many respects unexcelled. The plant consists of eleven build- 
ings, joined either directly or by underground passages. These provide 
ample accommodations for the care of hospital patients, for the teaching 
of the clinical branches, and for the various activities connected with the 
work of the preclinical departments of the medical college. 

CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE. Instruction in the medical sciences 
is conducted in a group of buildings extending along York Avenue from 
68th to 70th Streets, centering in a court at the end of 69th Street where 
the entrance to the Medical College is located. This group comprises 
four units facing on York Avenue, each of which is five stories high. The 
extreme northern and southern buildings connect with the central group 
by means of two-story structures. In this series of buildings the one to 
the north (unit A) is devoted entirely to the department of anatomy; the 
one next to this on the south (unit B) to bacteriology and immunology; 
the third (unit D) to physiology; the fourth (unit E) to biochemistry and 
pharmacology. A seven-story building (unit C) joins the buildings B and 
D in the center, and in this are the offices of the Medical College, the 
library, and the department of pathology. This central building of the 
College is joined on all floors with the central hospital building. Certain 
of the laboratories of the department of public health and preventive 
medicine are located in the two-story building which adjoins the bacteri- 
ology unit to the north, but the major part of this department is com- 
prised in the Kips Bay-Yorkville Health Center building of the City of 
New York, located half a block west from the Medical College on 69th 
Street. 

In the main buildings of the Medical College, student laboratories and 
lecture rooms are provided on the second and third floors, and extensive 
facilities for research by staff and students are available on other floors. 
Locker rooms are provided for the use of students. A cafeteria under the 
direction of the chief dietitian of the New York Hospital is maintained 
for students and Faculty. 

NEW YORK HOSPITAL. Clinical instruction is given in the five sepa- 
rate clinics forming the New York Hospital. The medical and surgical 
clinics occupy the central hospital building, while the women's clinic, 
the pediatric clinic, and the psychiatric clinic extend from north to 
south, overlooking the East River. Each clinic contains, besides provision 
for bed patients, its own out-patient department, lecture rooms, and 
laboratories for routine study and for clinical research. Special provision 



2ii CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

has also been made for the laboratory work of students. The medical 
clinic occupies the second to fourth floors of the central hospital build- 
ing, with six pavilions for bed patients, three floors for its outpatient de- 
partment, and extensive laboratories for chemical, physiological, and 
biological research. The surgical clinic occupies the pavilions from the 
fifth to the ninth floor, with outpatient and other facilities for the various 
surgical specialists. The operating rooms are on the tenth and eleventh 
floors. Above are six floors containing one hundred rooms for private 
patients, while the living quarters for the resident staff are on the six 
floors at the top of the building. The entire hospital has a capacity of 
approximately 1,182 beds. 

The head of each clinic, responsible for the care of patients and the 
conduct of professional services of the hospital, is also professor in charge 
of the corresponding department of the Medical College. Each clinical 
department is staffed in part by teachers and clinicians, including the 
professor in charge, who devote their entire time to the service of the 
College and Hospital, while other members of these departments devote 
part of their time to private practice. 

OTHER HOSPITALS FOR CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

Although the clinical teaching is conducted largely in the New York 
Hospital, advantage is also taken of special facilities afforded by other 
hospitals. In some of these hospitals the staff appointments are controlled 
by the Medical College, while in others the teaching privileges have been 
granted to the members of the staffs who are also members of the Medi- 
cal College Faculty. 

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL. Bellevue is the central hospital of the New 
York City Department of Hospitals. It contains 3,325 beds and is de- 
voted to the treatment of acute diseases. It is organized in four divisions, 
one of which has been placed at the disposal of the Faculty of Cornell 
University Medical College for medical instruction. The services con- 
ducted by the College include a medical service and a surgical service, 
each of 90 beds, a urological service and a neurological service of ap- 
proximately 60 beds. The staffs of these services are nominated by the 
College from among the members of its Faculty and teaching staff, and 
the Medical College is responsible for the professional conduct of these 
services. 

HOSPITAL FOR SPECIAL SURGERY. In the near future the Hos- 
pital for Special Surgery will occupy its new building adjacent to the 
New York Hospital and will be an affiliated institution within the New 
York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. Professionally, the Hospital for 
Special Surgery will become, in effect, the orthopedic service of the New 
York Hospital. 



GENERAL STATEMENT 29 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL. Through the generosity of the late Dr. 
James Douglas, who provided the hospital with an endowment for the 
study and treatment of cancer and allied diseases, the Memorial Hos- 
pital became affiliated in 1914 with Cornell University Medical College. 
The agreement between the Memorial Hospital and the College requires 
that the professional staff be named by the Council of the Medical Col- 
lege subject to the approval of the board of managers of the hospital. 
The facilities of the hospital, which are of exceptional value in the field 
of cancer, are available for study in this field by the members of the 
hospital staff, and unusual opportunities are afforded for instruction in 
the pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of neoplastic diseases. 

MANHATTAN STATE HOSPITAL [WARD'S ISLAND). This hos- 
pital for the care and treatment of mental diseases accommodates over 
5,000 patients. Through the courtesy of the superintendent, the depart- 
ment of psychiatry is enabled to utilize this clinical material for bedside 
study of patients and for the instruction of students. 

WILLARD PARKER HOSPITAL. Instruction in infectious diseases is 
conducted at the Willard Parker Hospital, where staff positions are held 
by members of the Faculty and teaching staff who have the privilege of 
conducting medical instruction. 

LINCOLN HOSPITAL. This unit of the New York City Department 
of Hospitals has a bed capacity of 469 and facilities for handling cases in 
all divisions of clinical work. Through cooperative arrangements made 
possible by members of our teaching staff holding assignments on the 
hospital staff, a certain part of the teaching of medicine in the second 
year course is carried out on the wards of Lincoln Hospital. The abun- 
dance of clinical material and the type of disease met with in this insti- 
tution afford a valuable adjunct to the work in this part of the medical 
course. 



THE RUSSELL SAGE INSTITUTE OF PATHOLOGY 

The Institute has been associated with Cornell University Medical 
College since 1913. At first it was affiliated with the Second Medical 
Cornell) Division of Bellevue Hospital, but since 1932 it has been in 
the New York Hospital. The Institute has supported work in metabo- 
lism which has been conducted by the members of the departments of 
medicine and physiology. The respiration calorimeter which was oper- 
ated for a number of years by Dr. DuBois at Bellevue Hospital has been 
transferred by the directors of the Institute to the New York Hospital, 
and sufficient fund^ have been provided for carrying on the important 
metabolic studies by members of the staff. The medical director of the 
Institute is Dr. David P. Barr, Professor of Medicine. 



30 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

THE LOOMIS LABORATORY 

Founded in 1886 and located at 414 East 26th Street, this institution 
served the purpose of undergraduate instruction in the Medical College 
and provided facilities for original research in the various departments 
of laboratory investigation. The present Medical College building con- 
tains space dedicated to the original Loomis Laboratory and its estab- 
lished objectives. 

THE LIBRARY 

The reading room of the library is situated on the second floor of the 
central group of laboratory buildings, directly over the entrance of the 
Medical College. The current journals are kept in racks around three 
sides of the room. The book stacks are directly behind and open to the 
reading room, extending down to the subbasement with six floors of 
stacks and accommodations for about 100,000 volumes. There are also 
a library seminar room and several rooms for the library staff. 

The library contains at present over 41,000 volumes, largely made up 
of complete sets of important journals in the fields of clinical medicine 
and the medical sciences, in English, German, and French. There are 
also well-selected collections of monographs, textbooks, and reprints. 

Several of the departments of the Medical College have libraries con- 
taining journals, monographs, and textbooks pertaining especially to 
the subject matter of the departments. These serve to supplement in a 
useful way the scope of the main library. 

The library is under the direction of a committee of the Faculty and 
in charge of a trained librarian who gives instruction to students on the 
proper methods of using the library and of searching medical literature. 

A special fund, maintained in memory of Alfred Moritz Michaelis, 
M.D. 1925, Cornell, who died the year after his graduation, is used for 
the purchase of books of cultural and historic values in medicine. 

In addition to the college library, students may obtain certain priv- 
ileges at the library of the New York Academy of Medicine, Fifth Ave- 
nue and 103rd Street, the second largest medical library in the United 
States. 



Requirements for Admission 
and Graduation 



THE FACULTY of Cornell University Medical College, in defining 
the qualifications for admission to the medical profession, attaches 
particular importance to the liberal culture and general education im- 
plied by the acquisition of a college degree. Because of the acceleration 
of college training under the Army and Navy programs during the war, 
the degree requirement was suspended. A return to the college degree as 
a prerequisite for acceptance has now been adopted by Faculty and 
Trustee action, and only the following candidates for the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine will be admitted to Cornell Medical College. 

1. Graduates of approved colleges or scientific schools; or 

2. Seniors in good standing in Cornell University or in any other 
approved college or scientific school whose faculty will permit them to 
substitute the first year of the professional course for the fourth year in 
arts and sciences, and who will confer upon them the Bachelor's degree 
upon the satisfactory completion of the first year of the course in the 
Cornell University Medical College. Students from institutions other than 
Cornell University seeking admisison under this clause must have a state- 
ment from the Dean of their college signifying approval of this plan for 
fulfilling the requirements for the degree. Any student failing to receive 
his degree under this arrangement will not be admitted to the second 
year of the medical course. 

3. Persons who, while not possessing a Bachelor's degree, give evi- 
dence by examination that they have acquired an equivalent education 
and a training sufficient to enable them to profit by the instruction of- 
fered in the Medical College. This rule is intended to apply to students of 
foreign universities. 

The basic premedical requirements which all students must fulfill to 
qualify for admission to the study of medicine in New York State are set 
forth in the "Regulations of the Commissioner of Education," the perti- 
nent part of which is as follows: "A candidate shall present evidence of 
ha\ing satisfactorily completed two years of study toward a liberal arts 
degree registered by the Department; or its equivalent as determined by 
the Commissioner. The required two years of college study shall include 
at least 6 semester hours each in English, physics, biology or zoolog\', and 
general chemistry, and 3 semester hours in organic chemistry." 

31 



32 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Although the requirements outlined above form the basis of eligibility 
for admission to the medical course, they should be considered as repre- 
senting the irreducible minimum. The list contains a total of twenty- 
seven credit points which probably represents sufficient time to enable 
the student to obtain a basic preparation in these diflferent fields. In many 
colleges, however, additional credits in one or more of these departments 
are required of the candidate in order to satisfy major requirements for 
the degree. In making the choice of elective courses, consideration should 
be given to the principle that thorough training in the sciences is essen- 
tial. On the other hand, choosing too many elective courses in these de- 
partments may not provide the most acceptable preparation for medicine, 
since it tends to limit the time available for study in other departments 
offering work of a broad educational value. Students planning to study 
medicine should bear in mind that bacteriology, immunology, human 
physiology, and abnormal psychology are properly subjects of the medical 
and not of the premedical curriculum. In planning premedical work stu- 
dents are advised to elect subjects which will lay a broad foundation for 
medical study rather than to anticipate courses required as a part of the 
medical curriculum. 

Each year the Admissions Committee selects an entering class of ap- 
proximately 83 students from a group of more than 1,500 applicants. 
The members of the committee are keenly aware of their serious re- 
sponsibility in selecting students who have the native ability, traits of 
character, soundness of personality, and adequate financial responsibility 
that will enable them to finish satisfactorily their course in the Medical 
College. A serious obligation to society is also acknowledged by a medical 
school. It must graduate only those persons who can be expected, with 
reasonable certainty, to do creditable work in some field of medicine after 
graduation. The Admissions Committee selects from all applicants those 
who seem best to fulfill such requirements. 

In selecting a relatively small class from a large group of well qualified 
applicants, the Committee is mindful of the sound and liberal traditions 
of Cornell University. They attempt to select well qualified students with 
varied backgrounds — from various geographic areas, from different socio- 
economic groups, and from varying types of educational institutions. As 
to grade averages, the Committee needs to satisfy itself that the appli- 
cant's scholastic record, both as to courses taken and grades received, 
gives reasonable assurance that the individual can do the medical cur- 
ricular work without undue difficulty. Grading systems vary so much from 
school to school that no specific grade can be categorically stated as 
minimally acceptable. To be accepted for admission a student must have 
a satisfactory scholastic record. Beyond that, grades are considered less 
important than the personal attributes — emotional stability, sound char- 
acter, healthy personality, intellectual maturity, strong motivation, and 
ability to cooperate. The Medical College Admission Test results arc 



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34 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

helpful in appraising an applicant's academic ability. No one pattern of 
extracurricular activities is considered more meritorious than another. 
The Admissions Committee looks at each applicant as a total individual, 
insofar as that is possible with the information obtainable. Those appli- 
cants are considered acceptable who have the qualities, abilities, and 
capabilities considered necessary in a person who hopes to become a 
physician. Eligibility for admission is determined without regard for race, 
creed, color, religion, or national origin. Admission policies are in con- 
formity with the policy of the state in regard to the American ideal of 
equality of opportunity as embodied in the Education Practices Act. 

As a general rule the courses given in professional schools of phar- 
macy, veterinary mxedicine, optometry, agriculture, and the like are not 
considered as fulfilling adequately the admission requirements. 

APPLICATIONS FOR ADMISSION 

All requests for application forms and inquiries regarding dates for 
submitting applications should be addressed to the Committee on Ad- 
missions, 1300 York Avenue, New York City. In making application for 
admission, the regular form issued for this purpose must be filled out 
and submitted to the Office of Admissions. Candidates are accepted for 
only one class in advance. With the large number of students making 
application in recent years, it has been necessary to assign a definite pe- 
riod for distributing application forms. For a class entering in September 
of a certain year, the application forms may be obtained on request be- 
ginning September 1 of the previous year. Applications should be com- 
pleted during the fall, and no application will be accepted after January 
15. A charge of $5 is made for submitting an application. This fee should 
be made payable to Cornell University Medical College in the form of 
a check or money order and is not returnable. 

Applications are passed upon by the Committee on Admissions after 
all credentials have been filed. As soon the Committee takes favorable 
action upon an applicant, a letter of acceptance is immediately forwarded 
to him, and the accepted applicant is required to make a deposit of $50 
within a specified time. This deposit is not returnable but is credited 
toward the first tuition payment. If the accepted student fails to make 
the deposit in the stipulated time, he forfeits his place on the class roll. 

It is impossible for the Committee on Admissions to hold personal con- 
ferences with all candidates for admission as the number is too great, but 
selected individuals from the group of applicants receive an invitation 
to appear before members of the Committee. 

A student who has previously attended another medical school and 
has been dropped for poor scholarship or unfavorable conduct is not an 
acceptable candidate for admission to any class in Cornell Medical Col- 
lege. It is inadvisable, therefore, for one with this background to go 
through the formality of submitting an application. 



ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 35 

ADMLSSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

When vacancies '^. cur, students may be admitted to advanced standing. 

Application for a place in one of the upper classes should be filed 
according to the procedure described for admission to the first year class. 
Accepted applicants are required to make the deposit of $50. Applicants 
must not only furnish acceptable evidence of having satisfactorily com- 
pleted in an approved medical school all of the work required of students 
of the class they wish to enter, but also of having completed the condi- 
tions of admission to the first year class at Cornell University Medical 
College. They must present a certificate of honorable dismissal from the 
medical school or schools they have attended, and they may be required 
to take examinations in any of the medical courses taken at another 
school. 

Although a certain number of students are regularly admitted from 
other institutions to enter the third year class at Cornell University Med- 
ical College, rarely have there been acceptances made of students to 
enter the fourth year on the basis of work at another medical school. 
Candidates seeking admission to the fourth year are required to come 
before the clinical departments for a thorough examination before final 
action is taken on their applications. 

Persons who have received the degree of Doctor of Medicine at an- 
other institution will not be accepted as candidates for this degree at 
Cornell University Medical College. Likewise, persons who have finished 
all or part of the course in dentistry and seek a transfer to medicine are 
discouraged from making application here since Cornell does not have 
a department of dentistry and makes no provision for adaptinjE^ the teach- 
ing in this subject to the medical curriculum. 

ADVANCEMENT AND EXAMINATION 

The entire medical curriculum is arranged in four courses, or academic 
years, and the student advances in steps of an academic year at a time. 
It is necessary that he complete all the subjects listed in a given academic 
year before taking up the next succeeding group of subjects, and to be 
readmitted to the Medical College in one of the advanced years (second, 
third, or fourth) he must be approved for promotion by the Faculty. 

Any student who by quality of work or conduct indicates an imfitness 
to enter the profession of medicine may, at the discretion of the Faculty, 
be required at any time to withdraw from the Medical College. 

At the close of the academic year examinations are given in all subjects 
except those extending through a part of the year only, in which exam- 
inations may be held at the close of the course in the hours allotted 
thereto. In making up a student's rating in a given course, all work cov- 
ered in that subject during the year is taken into account, and due weight 
is assigned to the efTort he puts in his work, his seriousness of purpose. 



:^6 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

and his scholastic resourcefulness, as well as the results of the final ex- 
amination. 

A final rating is made for each student at the end of the academic 
year, based on the results of his performance in all courses in the cur- 
riculum of that year. These final ratings of students are made on the 
recommendations of the Committee on Promotion and Graduation; then 
they are reviewed and formally acted on by the Faculty. The Faculty 
ratings classify all students of the medical course under one of four groups 
as follows: 

1. Students with no encumbrances in any subject are recorded as 
''passed." This rating confers eligibility for readmission into the Medical 
College in the next higher class, unless by reason of conduct the Faculty 
considers the student unsuited for the medical profession. 

2. Students with an unsatisfactory rating in 40 per cent or more of 
the required hours in a given year are recorded as "not passed." A rating 
of "not passed" carries ineligibility for readmission into the Medical 
College. 

3. Students with an unsatisfactory rating in less than 40 per cent of 
the required hours of a given year are recorded as "conditioned." A 
"conditioned" student has failures in certain required courses, and he 
may be reexamined in these subjects, but only after pursuing additional 
work under the direction of the head of the department in which a fail- 
ure has occurred. Students who fail on reexaminations are ineligible for 
readmission into the Medical College, unless under special circumstances 
they are permitted by the Faculty to repeat courses in which their work 
is deficient. 

4. vStudents with uniformly low grades in most subjects of the course 
for two years or more are subject to special review by the Faculty, and 
any student with a record of this kind may be deemed unqualified to 
enter the medical profession. A rating in this group carries ineligibility 
for readmission into the Medical College. 

It is a well established policy of the Medical College to make no an- 
nouncement to students of grades received in any subject of the medical 
course. At the close of each academic year, however, students are in- 
formed of the quarter of the class in which their weighted average score 
places them in the order of class standing. 

A transcript of the Medical College record of a student or graduate 
will be mailed on his request to accredited hospitals and to educational 
or other well recognized institutions as credentials in support of his ap- 
plication for a position or promotion. All transcripts are marked "con- 
fidential" and carry the instructions that they are not to be turned over 
to the candidate. This ruling is for the purpose of avoidin^r possible loss 
and fraudulent use of an official document of the Medical College. The 
Medical College makes no charge for sending out transcripts of record. 



ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 37 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine must have at- 
tained the age of twenty-one years and be of good moral character. 

They must have completed successfully four full courses of at least 
eis^ht months each as re2:ular matriculated medical students, the last of 
which must have been in Cornell University Medical College. They must 
have satisfactorily completed all the required work of the medical cur- 
riculum and must have passed all prescribed examinations. At the end 
of the fourth year every student who has fulfilled these requirements will 
be recommended to the President and Trustees of Cornell University for 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

EXAMINATIONS FOR MEDICAL LICENSURE 

Graduates of Cornell University Medical Coliecre are admitted un- 
conditionally to the examinations for license to practice medicine in all 
states of the United States. 

Students and graduates of Cornell University Medical College are ad- 
mitted to the examinations of the National Board of Medical Exam- 
iners, whose certificate is recognized by the respective authorities of 
England, Scotland, and Ireland. Although national in scope and organ- 
ized under the laws of the District of Columbia, the National Board of 
Medical Examiners is not to be confused with a federal government 
agency. For information write to the National Board of Medical Ex- 
aminers. 133 South 36 Street. Philadelphia 4. Pa. 



General Information 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

ALL FEES for instruction and other charges are paid at the Business 
. Office of the Medical College, Room F-106, 1300 York Avenue, 
New York 21, N.Y. 

Veterans receiving federal or state educational benefits are required 
to report to the Veterans Affairs Office, Room A-131, immediately after 
registering. 

The Board of Trustees of Cornell University reserves the right to 
change the schedule of fees of the Medical College when deemed expe- 
dient. 

APPLICATION FEE 

A charge made for reviewing an application $ 5.00 

ACCEPTANCE DEPOSIT $50.00 

Each student admitted is given notice of favorable action on 
his application and a limited time (usually two weeks) in 
which to decide if he will enroll in the entering class. His 
name is not placed on the class list until the acceptance fee 
is paid. The fee is credited toward the tuition charge and is 
not returnable if the student fails to enter. 

MATRICULATION FEE (payable only once) .. $ 10.00 

TUITION FEE, for academic year $900.00 

This charge is payable at the beginning of the academic year, 
or in three equal parts, the first of which must be made at 
registration. For fourth year students in the academic year of 
1954-55, the first installment will be due on or before Septem- 
ber 16. No refund or rebate will be made in any instance. 

STUDENT HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE, for calen- 
dar year $19.20 
This insurance is carried through the Associated Hospital 
Service (Blue Cross plan) and may be extended to wives and 
families of married students at additional cost. This com- 
pulsory insurance plan assures a limited period of care to all 
students during the time they are members in good standing 
in the Medical Colles^e. 

38 



FEES, EXPENSES, HEALTH SERVICE 39 

BREAKAGE DEPOSIT $10.00 

This deposit is required of first and second year students at 
the beginning of each academic year and will be returned, 
less the amount charged for breakage, at the end of the second 
year. 

GRADUATION FEE $25.00 

This charge is payable two months before graduation. 

BOOKS AND INSTRUMENTS, EXCLUSIVE OF MICROSCOPES 

The average cost is approximately $135 a year, distributed as follows: 
first year, $150; second year, $215; third year, $125; fourth year, $50. 

MICROSCOPES 

Each student is required to provide himself with a microscope of an 
approved type. The College Book Store handles all makes, and students 
placing their orders here are given every consideration in the purchase 
price on the instrument they select. 

RESIDENCE AND LIVING EXPENSES 

F. W. Olin Hall, student residence, will be completed for occupancy 
in September, 1954. This building was made possible by a generous gift 
from the Olin Foundation. The residence is located on York Avenue at 
69th Street, directly across the street from the Medical College entrance. 
It will contain a gymnasium, snack bar, lounge rooms, and 281 residence 
rooms. Each residence room is furnished as a single bedroom-study, but, 
since each two rooms have a connecting bath, they may be used as a 
suite for two students if desired. The rooms are completely furnished, 
and linen service is provided. It is anticipated that rental will be $35 
per month. One floor is reserved for women students, and nonhouse- 
keeping facilities for married students will be available. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Members of the first year class and students transferred to advanced 
standing from other colleges are required to have a physical examina- 
tion by a member of the Student Health Staff. In addition, each student 
in the Medical College must report once a year for an X-ray examina- 
tion of the lungs. All members of the fourth year class are called for a 
reexamination, and a careful check of the findings is made with those 
presented at the time the student entered. Students pay no fee for the 
yearly X-ray examination, nor for the services of the Student Health 
Staff, but they are charged for any special X-ray studies. Office hours are 
held from twelve to two o'clock daily by the Student Health Staff. 
Health records are kept and students advised concerning their physical 
condition and general health. All cases of illness must be reported to 



40 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

the College office. Students may have in attendance physicians of their 
own choice, but a reasonable amount of cooperation bewteen such 
physicians and the College's Health Service is expected. 

PRIZES 

1. FOR GENERAL EFFICIENCY. In commemoration of John Met- 
calfe Polk, an instructor in this college who was graduated from Cornell 
University Medical College June 7, 1899, and died on March 29, 1904, 
prizes will be presented at each commencement to the three students 
having the highest standing for the four years' work. Only those who 
have taken the full course of study at Cornell University Medical Col- 
lege are eligible. The first prize is $250, the second $100, and the third 
$50. 

2. FOR EFFICIENCY IN OPHTHALMOLOGY. Two prizes, the 
first of $50, and the second of $25, are offered by Professor Bernard 
Samuels to the two students of the graduating class who make the best 
records in ophthalmology. 

3. FOR EFFICIENCY IN OTOLARYNGOLOGY. Two prizes, the 
first of $50, and the second of $25, are offered by members of the staff of 
otolaryngology to the two students of the graduating class who make 
the best record in this specialty. 

4. FOR EFFICIENCY IN OBSTETRICS. Two prizes, the first of 
$50, the second of $25, have been endowed by an anonymous donor in 
recognition of the work of Dr. Gustav Seeligman, in obstetrics, to be 
given to the two students of the graduating class who have made the best 
records in obstetrics. 

5. FOR EFFICIENCY IN GENERAL MEDICINE. The income 
from $1,000 is offered as a prize for general efficiency in the department 
of medicine, in commemoration of Alfred Moritz Michaelis, who was 
graduated from Cornell University Medical College on June 11, 1925, 
and who died during his internship at Mt. Sinai Hospital, April 24, 
1926. Presented at each commencement to a member of the graduating 
class who has pursued the full course at Cornell University Medical 
College. 

6. THE MARY ALDRICH FUND. In memory of William Mecklen- 
burg Polk, M.D., LL.D., first dean of the Medical College, two prizes 
are offered for proficiency in research to regularly matriculated students 
of the Cornell University Medical College, the first of $150. and the 
second of $50. Members of all classes are eligible for these prizes. 

The awards are made at the end of each academic year for the best 
report presented in writing of research work done by students, or for 
valuable reviews and logical presentations on medical subjects not to 



PRIZES, SCHOLARSHIPS, LOANS 41 

be found fully considered in a single text or reference book. If the 
papers submitted are not considered worthy of special commendation 
the prizes will be withheld. 

Papers are submitted in quadruplicate in a sealed envelope marked 
"Dean William Mecklenburg Polk Memorial Prize Committee" and 
must be in the Administration Office not later than three weeks prior to 
the end of each academic year. 

The committee of awards for this prize consists of two members of 
the Faculty from laboratory departments and two from clinical depart- 
ments. 

For 1954 the William Mecklenburg Polk Prize awards for research 
were: first prize: Nancy C. Arnold; second prize: Ralph C. Williams, 
Jr. and David H. Law, IV. 

7. THE WILLIAM C. THRO MEMORIAL FUND. Established in 
memory of William C. Thro of the class of 1901 whose all-absorbing 
interest in and devotion to clinical pathology found expression in the 
teaching and practice of this subject in his alma mater continuously 
from 1910 to 1938. This prize award is to be given to the student show- 
ing the best record in the course in clinical pathology. The candidate for 
the prize is to be recommended by the professor of clinical pathology 
and the award made by the Committee on Prizes and Scholarships. 

8. THE HERMAN L. JACOBIUS PRIZE IN PATHOLOGY. Es- 
tablished in 1945 by a gift from Dr. Lawrence Jacobius and his friends 
in memory of his son who was killed in action in the Netherlands on 
September 28, 1944. Dr. Herman L. Jacobius was a member of the class 
of 1939. The income of the fund is available annually to the student of 
the third or fourth year class who, in the opinion of the staff of the de- 
partment of pathology, merits recognition for high scholastic attain- 
ments and outstanding performance in the subject of pathology. If in 
any year no student merits the distinction the award will be withheld. 

9. THE BORDEN UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH AWARD. 

The terms of this grant by The Borden Company Foundation, Inc., pro- 
vide for awards of $500 during any one calendar year for a period of 
five years. The award will be made under the following terms and con- 
ditions: 

1. All persons in the graduating: class of the Medical College of Cornell Univer- 
sity who, during any year while enrolled in the C^^llege, have carried out under- 
graduate research in the medical field shall be eligible for the Borden Undergrad- 
uate Research Award in Medicine. The award shall be presented at the time of 
his graduation to that eligible person whose research has been determined by the 
Medical College to be the most meritorious performed by all similarly eligible 
persons. Originality and thoroughness of research shall be of primary consideration. 

2. In the event that the Dean shall find it inappropriate to make the award in 
any one year, the award may be deferred to another year. Only one award, how- 
ever, will be made during any one calendar year. 



42 



CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 



Papers submitted for this prize should be in quadrupHcate and must 
be in the Administration Office not later than three weeks before the 
end of the term. 

The Borden Prize for Research for the year 1954 was awarded to 
Harry W. Daniell. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

1. THE JOHN METCALFE POLK SCHOLARSHIP. A gift under 
the will of William Mecklenburg Polk, the first Dean of the Medical 
College, is awarded annually by the Faculty. The scholarship amounts 
to about $200 a year. 

2. THE THORN E SHAW SCHOLARSHIP FUND. This fund pro- 
vides three scholarships designated as : 

First: A scholarship of approximately $400 available to students after 

at least two years of study in the Medical College. 
Second: Two scholarships of approximately $200 each available to 

students after at least one year of study in the Medical College. 
These scholarships are awarded by the Faculty upon nomination by 
the Committee on Scholarships and Prizes. They are awarded annually 
in June and are for one year only. Students receiving the scholarships 
are notified of the award at the end of the session. 

3. MARY F. HALL SCHOLARSHIP. The income, amounting to 
about $180 annually, from a fund established by bequest of Miss Mary 
F. Hall, is available to any woman student in Cornell University Medi- 
cal College who needs its aid and who is a bona fide resident of the 
State of New York and was such prior to admission to the College. 

4. THE 1936 JOHN AND KATHERINE MAYER SCHOLARSHIP 
FUND. A five thousand dollar fund established in 1936, the income 
from which is annually available to meritorious students who need its 
aid, and who have completed one or more years of the regular medical 
course. The award is for one year only, but tenable for a second or third 
year providing the qualifications of the candidate merit a reaward. If 
during any year the income from the fund is not used as stated above, 
then it mav be used for such research work, or otherwise, as in the 
judgment of the Faculty (or Trustees) may be deemed best. 

5. THE 1939 JOHN AND KATHERINE MAYER SCHOLARSHIP 
FUND. A five thousand dollar fund established in 1939, the income 
from which is annually available to meritorious students who need its 
aid, and who have completed one or more years of the regular medical 
course. The award is for one year only, but tenable for a second or 
third year providing the qualifications of the candidate merit a re- 
award. If durine anv year the income from the fund is not used as stated 



PRIZES, SCHOLARSHIPS, LOANS 43 

above, then it may be used for such research work, or otherwise, as in 
the judgment of the Faculty (or Trustees) may be deemed best. 

6. THE JEREMIAH S. FERGUSON SCHOLARSHIP. Established 
in memory of Jeremiah S. Ferguson, who throughout his long connec- 
tion with the Medical College, of somewhat more than forty years, de- 
voted much effort to helping students with their individual problems 
and promoting their professional careers. The fund amounts to $5,000, 
the income from which, approximately $200 a year, is awarded annually 
by the Committee on Scholarships and Prizes to a student or students 
in the third and fourth year classes in the Medical College who are in 
need of financial aid and who by conduct and scholarship have proved 
worthy investments. 

7. THE CHARLES RUPERT STOCKARD SCHOLARSHIP. A ten 

thousand dollar fund was established in 1939 by a friend of the late 
Charles Rupert Stockard, Professor of Anatomy in the Cornell Univer- 
sity Medical College, 1911-39. The interest of this fund is to be awarded 
either to one student (approximately $400) or to two students (ap- 
proximately $200 each) who have shown promise in the work in the de- 
partment of anatomy and who are desirous of doing advanced work in 
this department. The scholarships are to be awarded by the Executive 
Faculty upon nomination by the head of the department of anatomy. 

8. THE DR. JOHN A. HEIM SCHOLARSHIPS. Established under 
the will of John A. Heim of the class of 1905 to provide such number of 
scholarships in the Medical College as there shall be funds available for 
that purpose. The awards are to be made to regularly matriculated medi- 
cal students who are in need of financial assistance, as provided for in 
the term.s of the bequest. 

First year students are eligible, provided they meet the standards pre- 
scribed. 

9. THE DR. CHARLES I. HYDE '10 AND EVA HYDE SCHOL- 
ARSHIP FUND. Established in memory of their daughter, Anita Shir- 
ley Hyde. The terms of this endowment pro\'ide that the income be 
available annually to meritorious students who have completed one year 
of the regular medical course and are in need of assistance. The income 
from this endowment amounts to about $100 yearly. 

10. THE DR. JACQUES SAPHIER SCHOLARSHIP FUND. Es- 
tablished in memory of Dr. Jacques Conrad Saphier (Lieutenant, j.g., 
USNR) of the class of 1940, who was killed in action on August 21, 
1942, at Guadalcanal while in the performance of his duty. The income 
from this fund shall be awarded annually to a meritorious student of the 
Cornell University Medical College who has completed at least one 
year of work, who needs its aid, and who. in the opinion of the Facultv 
merits the recognition for which this scholarship was established. 



44 CORNELL MEDICAL ClOLLEGE 

11. THE ELISE STRANG UESPERANCE SCHOLARSHIP. This 
award is maintained by the personal contributions of Dr. Elise Strang 
L'Esperance, whose interests in the educational advancements of the 
Medical College have continued for many years. The value of this schol- 
arship is $1,000, and the award is to be given annually to the most out- 
standing woman medical student in the fourth year class in Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College. The selection of the recipient of this scholarship 
is to be made by the Dean in consultation with persons suggested under 
the original donation. 

12. THE SAGAN FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP. An annual 
scholarship of $500 to be awarded to a student in Cornell University 
Medical College, to be selected by the College on the basis of scholar- 
ship and need, without reference to race, color, sex, or creed. In the 
event the Foundation should discontinue the award, at least one year's 
notice shall be given the Medical College. A special blank issued by the 
Sa2:an Foundation should be obtained from the Dean's Office by stu- 
dents making application for this scholarship. 

13. RUTH HOLLOHAN SCHOLARSHIP FUND. This fund was 
established by the terms of the will of Jessie L. Hollohan in memory of 
Ruth Hollohan. The income is to be used for scholarships for students 
in the Medical Colleoe. with first consideration to be given to entering 
students of good scholarship who are in need of financial assistance. 

14. THE WALLACE D. GARRABRANDT SCHOLARSHIP. Es- 
tablished by Mabel G. Gormley. This scholarship, amounting: to ap- 
proximately $200, is to be awarded annually by the Committee on 
Scholarships to a regularly matriculated medical student of good 
scholarship who is in need of financial assistance. 

15. LEONA E. TODD SCHOLARSHIP. Under the terms of the will 
of Alzina T. Elliott, a scholarship has been established for women stu- 
dents in the Medical CoUeee. The income from the gift is approximately 
$800 per year. 

16. JOHN WILLIAM TAT EM SCHOLARSHIP. Through the gen- 
erosity of John William Tatem, a scholarship has been established for an 
entering student. This is to be awarded to an applicant who has show^n 
outstanding ability and who needs aid to enable him to attend medical 
school. The award is for $1,250 yearly as long as the student maintains 
a good record in his medical studies. 

17. ANONYMOUS SCHOLARSHIP. A generous donor has estab- 
lished two scholarships, each paying $2,000 a year for four years of medi- 
cal study. One such award may be made every two years. These scholar- 
ships are to be given to students whose qualifications give outstanding 
promise for success in medicine, and who are unable to attend medical 
school without financial assistance. 



HONOR SOCIETIES AND ALUMNI 45 

18. ANONYMOUS GIFTS SCHOLARSHIP FUND. From time to 
time gifts are made by anonymous donors, to offer financial assistance to 
needy students of good scholastic standing. The money made available 
by this fund each year is awarded as tuition aid by the Committee on 
Scholarships. 

BURSARY FOR WOMEN STUDENTS 

THE MARIE AND JOHN ZIMMERMAN FUND. A sum from this 
fund will be available this year to certain women students as a memorial 
to Marie Zimmerman, Sr. The candidates will be chosen in accordance 
with the purposes of the donor as set forth in the following terms: 

"It is the desire of the Fund that Dr. Connie M. Guion and the As- 
sistant Dean assign the proceeds of the donations to one or more women 
medical students who are financially in need of assistance and whose 
academic standing leads them to believe that the recipients of the awards 
will make a success in their profession." 

The objectives and method of assigning these awards will follow the 
principles accompanying the donations received during the present 
year. 

LOAN FUNDS 

1. THE 1923 LOAN FUND. The income from this fund amounts to 
$350 a year and is available as a loan to students needing financial assist- 
ance, preferably to a third year student. 

2. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION LOAN FUNDS. The Alumni Associa- 
tion of the Medical College is able to aid a few students in meeting their 
expenses by the Jessie P. Andresen Memorial Fund and the Class Student 
Loan Funds. The loans made from these funds will be administered by 
the Board of Directors of the Alumni Association. The Medical College 
is consulted in making these awards. Students in the upper classes will 
be given preference. 

3. STUDENT LOAN FUND. A revolving fund contributed through 
different sources including The Kellogg Foundation, The Charles Hay- 
den Foundation, and the Student Book Store is available to students in 
all classes who are in need of assistance. Eveiy effort is made within the 
limitations of the financial structure of the institution to help students 
who by reason of unforeseen circumstances get into money difficulties. A 
special committee considers each case on its individual merits. A student 
having indebtedness to the Medical College in other ways than formal 
loans is ineligible for graduation. 

ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA 

Alpha Omega Alpha is a nonsecret Medical College Honor Society, 
membership in which is based upon scholarship, moral qualifications be- 



46 CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE 

ing satisfactory. It was organized at the College of Medicine of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, Chicago, August 25, 1902. A.O.A. is the only order of 
its kind on this continent. 

Elections are made from students who have fully completed two years 
of a four year curriculum, by unanimous vote of the active members 
acting on recommendations made by Faculty advisers. Not more than 
one-sixth of any class may be elected. As aspects of and indispensable to 
true scholarship are included open-mindedness, individuality, original- 
ity, demonstration of studious attitude, and promise of intellectual 
growth. 

The Cornell Chapter of A.O.A. was organized May 2, 1910. A large 
number of the Faculty are members. The Chapter sponsors an annual 
open lecture delivered in the Medical College Auditorium on a cultural 
or historical phase of medicine. 

The members elected from the graduating class of 1954 are the fol- 
lowing: Wilmot C. Ball, Jr., Robert L. Beals, Harry W. Daniell, George 
Dermksian, Kenneth A. Hubel, Melvin J. King, David H. Law, IV, 
Thomas H. Meikle, Jr., Edward S. Mongan, Philip R. Nast, Robert C. 
Patten, Saul L. Sanders, Robert E. Shope, Ralph C. Williams, Jr. 

SIGMA XI 

Sigma Xi, a national honorary society devoted to the encouragement 
of scientific research, was founded at Cornell University at Ithaca in 
1886. An active branch of the Cornell Chapter is maintained at the 
Medical College. Many members of the Faculty and research staff are 
members of Sigma Xi and share in the activities of the Cornell Chapter. 
Medical students are eligible for election to membership in Sigma Xi on 
the basis of proved ability to carry on original medical research and on 
nomination by active members of the Cornell Chapter. 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Officers 

William A. Barnes, '37 President 

John A. Evans, '35 Vice President 

Keith O. Guthrie, '40 Secretary 

Henry A. Carr, '35 Treasurer 

Miss Ellen R. Phillips Executive Secretary 

Directors 

Three Year Term: Irving S. Wright, '26; Joseph F. Artusio, Jr., '43. 
Two Year Term: Nelson W. Cornell, '21; Mary Ann Payne, '45. 
One Year Term: Paul Reznikoff, '20; Connie M. Guion, '17. 



HONOR SOCIETIES AND ALUMNI 47 

Alumni Quarterly 
David N. Barrows, '12 Editor 

Willis M. Weeden, '19 Associate Editor 

Edward F. Stanton, '35 Associate Editor 

Each graduate of Cornell University Medical College is automatically 
considered a member of the Alumni Association, and the dues are $5 a 
year. The activities of the Association include a quarterly publication, 
an annual banquet, student and faculty parties, student loan funds, and 
an employment bureau. The Association maintains an office at 1300 
York Avenue. 

An annual appeal for funds for the use of the Medical College is made 
to members of the Association. 



Educational Policies 
and Plan of Instruction 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE is divided into twelve major depart- 
ments, seven of which are primarily concerned with the sciences un- 
derlying clinical medicine. They are anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, 
microbiology and immunology, pathology, pharmacology, and public 
health and preventive medicine. Five departments have as their major 
functions the study, treatment, and prevention of human diseases, and 
maternity care. These are medicine, surgery, pediatrics, psychiatry, and 
obstetrics and gynecology. 

The heads of these major departments, together with the President of 
the University and the Dean, constitute the Executive Faculty, which is 
responsible for the educational policies of the College. 

Courses required to be completed by each student before the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine is conferred by Cornell University are offered by 
each department. These courses are arranged, in their sequence and 
duration, to develop logically the knowledge and training of students 
and to build up gradually the requirements needed for graduation as 
Doctor of Medicine. The various departments also offer courses and 
opportunities for special study open to regular medical students, to 
candidates for advanced degrees in the Graduate School of Cornell 
University and to qualified advanced students of medicine not candi- 
d